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Posts tagged as “Idaho Senate”

Cut off before the first step

Nicole LeFavour

Nicole LeFavour

There isn't a formal bill text to link to here, because in Idaho until bills are formally "introduced" they are considered the personal property of the sponsor, not public record. (Try wrapping your mind around that one.) So we don't have text, but the description in the blog of reporter Betsy Russell should be nearly as good: "to extend the Idaho Human Rights Act’s anti-discrimination provisions to cover sexual orientation and gender identity."

The reason there's no bill is because the Senate State Affairs committee considering introduction decided not to print it - not only deciding not to approve of the idea, but deciding as well to give the idea no currency, no distribution for public discussion. Many pieces of legislation are introduced with the understanding that the bill might be flawed, might not get majority support, but the concept is worth a chat. Members, and the governor, and some others, often are able to get an introduction done just as a matter of courtesy. In this case, a proposal on a policy solidly ensconced in law in many other states (Washington and Oregon among them), no introduction was granted.

The key sponsor was Senator Chuck Coiner, R-Twin Falls. On the committee, Senator Joe Stegner, R-Lewiston, made the motion to introduce; Senator Kate Kelly, R-Boise, seconded. The others on the committee, Senators Denton Darrington, R-Declo, Monty Pearce, R-New Plymouth, Bob Geddes, R-Soda Springs, and Russ Fulcher, R-Meridian, (and possibly a fifth member as well) voted against. They did not speak on the issue.

Senator Nicole LeFavour, D-Boise, the one openly gay legislator Idaho has ever had, spoke on the measure at the hearing and remarked afterward, “I know better of them, and I know in their hearts they know better. That’s the hardest part.” On her blog later:

On a simple print hearing vote this morning where seven committee members heard from Senator Coiner first and then from me on why more than 42,000 people deserve to be able to work at their jobs, go to school and live in a house or apartment without fear, the senate state affairs committee voted five to two not to introduce the proposal as a bill.

Not to even give it the courtesy of print. Not to acknowledge that discrimination against gay people might be a problem worth discussing inside the state's law making body.

Clearly we have far far to go and need many more voices in there with ours because people all over this state live quietly in fear every day. In school rooms, in board rooms, at desks, in processing plants and apartment complexes. What are the values of a state which, by omission, condones discrimination year after year, whose law makers know better, but refuse to stand up and act.

The committee members asked not a single question. Senator Steger, always valliant, made the motion to approve the introduction of the bill. Senator Kelly seconded. The committee was silent but for their brief voice vote. Five to two. No.