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Posts tagged as “governor”

Closure unavailing


“But they’re closed on Saturday!”

And not there on Friday either.

The Idaho Supreme Court decision last week throwing out Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter’s veto of the bill to ban instant horse racing at Les Bois Park, an action which has split pieces of the state executive and legislative branches down the middle, reads like a complex and abstract piece in most news reports. Attorney David Leroy called it a “sweeping and significant precedent.” Otter said he was certain the the veto he signed was valid.

What the court decision mostly was, was a recital of the law.

Let’s break it down.

Late in the afternoon of March 30, a Monday, Senate Bill 1011 (the racing bill) was physically carried to Otter’s office. He then could sign it into law, if he chose, or do nothing, in which case the bill would become law automatically. (Governors sometimes but not usually do this.) Or, he could veto it, but if he wanted to do that, he had to act promptly. The Idaho Constitution says: “Any bill which shall not be returned by the governor to the legislature within five days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, shall become a law in like manner as if he had signed it,” unless the legislature has already adjourned for the year. Which it hadn’t.

Otter’s choice was a veto, and he may have signed his veto message on April 3, a Friday. That’s within the five-day period. But the Constitution says the vetoed bill had to be returned to the legislature, specifically to the Senate, within those five days - that is, by Saturday afternoon. There was a complication: That was Easter weekend, and the legislature had adjourned on Thursday to take three days off.

Whether because of sloppiness or over-confidence or some other motivation, Otter or his staff must have thought it would be all right if the vetoed bill went back to the Senate the next Monday morning - which was more than five days (with Sunday not counted) after the bill was presented to him. What’s a few hours among friends?

And besides, what choice did he have? The legislature wasn’t there on Friday, right? The office doors were closed. How could he return the bill?

But the Idaho code actually covers a case like this. It says (in Section 67-504), “If, on the day the governor desires to return a bill without his approval and with his objections thereto to the house in which it originated, that house has adjourned for the day (but not for the session), he may deliver the bill with his message to the presiding officer, clerk, or any member of such house, and such delivery is as effectual as though returned in open session, if the governor, on the first day the house is again in session, by message notifies it of such delivery, and of the time when, and the person to whom, such delivery was made.”

In other words, the veto could have stuck if the governor’s office had on Friday or Saturday tracked down any state senator and handed him or her the vetoed bill - and then formally notified the Senate on Monday.

It helps if you know how things work. And what the law says.

The Idaho Supreme Court did make an interesting and possibly new point about “standing” when it held the Coeur d’Alene Tribe had standing to bring the case. But when it came to deciding this convoluted question of whether the veto was valid or not, it simply recited the law.

First ladies


e have all heard the cliches which describe the influence mothers and wives exercise over the men in their lives who hold public office or positions of prominense. Phrases such as “the hand that rocks the cradle,” “the power behind the throne,” and the ambiguous “pillow talk,” come to mind.

Most successful male political practitioners have around them either a strong mother, or a strong wife, or both.

In Idaho, some of her more successful governors either had or still have spouses that were critical elements in helping win elections and govern. Some First Ladies were or are key advisors to their husbands. Others saw or see their role as that of being a protective mother hen whose purpose is to fight for “get away time” for their spouse, for relaxation and recharging the batteries. Many First Ladies have exercised their influence by controlling the schedule.

None of these primary roles are mutually exclusive. Several First Ladies in Idaho functioned in several capacities for their spouse.

One of the best First Ladies in Idaho history, Lola Evans, was laid to rest in the Malad cemetary last week, next to her beloved husband, John V., who served as governor for ten straight years, from 1977 to 1987.

Lola Evans ranks in the top tier along with Carol Andrus and Grace Jordan. All three of these First Ladies made significant contributions to the success and well-being of their husbands, as did most of Idaho’s First Ladies. These three, though, were adept politicians in their own right. All three governors recognized their spouse had unerringly good instincts.

None were or are demure wall flowers hesitant to tell the governor of a “miscalculation.” All, though, kept their counsel in the home for all three share another quality---fierce loyalty to the spouse and zealous protection of the spouse and the family.

Early in my journalism career when I was the political reporter for the Idaho State Journal I made a passing reference to one of then State Senator Cecil Andrus’ daughters giving him an “in” with students at ISU because the daughter was dating the student body president.

Mrs. Andrus was not pleased and made certain I should have known references to candidate or officeholders spouse or children was “off limits” unless they were directly injected into a campaign. She wa absolutely correct. There was a reason why she learned her husband had hired me to be his press secretary only by reading the Idaho Statesman.

What made Lola Evans stand out was her fine sense of humor and her sense of adventure. One can learn much about another if they have to travel with them. Some call it “the four-day raft trip” test. Was the person a good traveling companion? Did one encounter an unexpected challenge that required poise and presence?

Mrs. Evans passed that test with flying colors. In 1975 I accompanied then Lt. Governor John Evans and Mrs. Evans on a week-long trade mission to Japan. Two nights before we left to return home I switched all of us from our five-star western hotel to a three-star genuine ryoken, a Japanese Inn.

From a soft queen-size bed to sleeping on the tatami mats; from western food to Japanese fare and no utinsels, just chop-sticks; from waitresses who spoke English to servers who spoke only Japanese---it was a stunning change.

Most First Ladies could not or would not have agreed to such a total change. Lola Evans took it in stride, thoroughly enjoyed herself and thanked me afterwards for taking the group out of a transplanted, homogenized faux wertern experience and instead providing them with a true cross-cultural experience.

When one recognizes that the spouse of an officeholder often has to carry almost all the child rearing responsibilities, keep the home presentable, be ready to prepare fine meals when the hubby suddenly brings home an unannounced guest, often do all the shopping and pay all the bills, and still is expected to stand by the guy at countless receptions and accompany him on the “rubber chicken” circuit, all while maintaining the right appearance, only then can one begin to appreciate what valuable asssets First Ladies like Lola Evans can be and were for their husbands.

Multi-tasking does not begin to describe the skill.

John Evans only lost one political race in his life (the last one). A full partner in his success was Lola Daniel Evans - the sine qua non of his career. May God’s angels convey her swiftly to the bosum of the Lord and a joyful reunion with her governor amidst the communion of Saints.

Early in, early . . . mulling


Allen Alley

In contrast to some other statewide offices last time around, Oregon Republicans actually do have a probable candidate for governor next year, one with some campaign experience and a professional background that gives the sense of a credible contender. And Democrats don't even have a clear, definitive contender yet.

And how excited are Oregon Republicans about Allen Alley?

A post and comments at Oregon Catalyst gives a fair sense of the mixed feelings involved. Some commenters point out that Alley is an intelligent, capable guy, an experience and articulate executive. Others note the areas in which he doesn't exactly line up with the Republican activist base, and how he isn't an especially charismatic contender.

Blogger Tim Lyman, who argues that a Republican running these days in Oregon has to be a sterling campaign to have a shot: "If anyone had told me there could be a less exciting candidate for Governor than Ron Saxton, I never would have believed it. But, over a year and a half out from the election, the Oregon Republican establishment is already lining up behind Allen Alley."

A commenter in reply: "Okay, Tim. If not Alley... than whom? I disagree with you that it is too early to line up behind a candidate. I think Alley is an excellent candidate. I just don't see anyone else emerging that can raise the enormous amount of money that will be needed to be competitive??? I'm curious to see who you are suggesting to line up behind?"

Quite a committee

The federal stimulus money has been politicized in various ways around the country; among Republican governors, there's been talk of not accepting it (though all or nearly all probably will). Idaho Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter, never a fan of the feds or federal money, has engaged in a little of that. But his first practical response so far has been impressive: An advisory committee on stimulus spending that isn't just an advisory committee, because of who is on it - three former governors plus four former state budget directors, the overall panel split evenly between the parties.

The governors are Democrats Cecil Andrus and John Evans and Republican Phil Batt.

That (together with the budget office expertise) make up a classy combination. And it's not your usual advisory committee, because whatever this one comes up with will be very hard to casually dismiss.

OR: Prospects for 10

Jason Atkinson

Jason Atkinson

A recommended read on the Oregonian Jeff Mapes blog, about state Senator Jason Atkinson, R-Central Point; Atkinson is a prime prospect for the field of Oregon gubernatorial candidates in 2010.

Should be noted that when he ran for governor in 2006, he finished third - and not an especially close third - in the Republican primary. But that was then. Neither the two contenders who topped him (Kevin Mannix and Ron Saxton) almost certainly are out of the picture for 2010. The dynamic then favored a Republican nominee who would run as the centrist guy (that was supposed to be Saxton), while Atkinson is solidly conservative. But the internal party dynamic may be different next time, especially after the Saxton loss. Atkinson would start this effort with the revival of his old organization, building from there - a better start than most other Republicans not named Smith or Walden would have.

Besides which, there was this: Atkinson displayed excellent campaign skills in 2006, better maybe than his opponents. He delivered a knack for communicating with a centrist tone while not abandoning his essential take on things. He could be a very strong candidate for 2010.

Kempthorne for president?

Dirk Kempthorne

Dirk Kempthorne

Don't count on this one happening. But in some ways there's not a shock in seeing it - the notion being floated about Dirk Kempthorne, former interior secretary and former Idaho governor and senator, running for president in 2012. (To be clear, there's no specific indication that any of this has come from Kempthorne himself.)

A few thoughts . . .

One is that having such trial balloons floated isn't an especially bad idea, even if you never follow up on them. The idea that you might become a real national figure, in the top=rank way that presidential contenders and few others are, gives you heft and prominence in whatever you're doing right now, whether that is serving in Congress, as governor of Alaska or even if you're in the process of nailing down ongoing employment.

Another is that there's some reflection here of the thinness of the national Republican bench. Looking to 2012 there are such names as Romney and Palin and Huckabee, but their actual campaign history in 2008 exposed serious weaknesses for all of them, and many Republicans may be looking elsewhere. But where? Going back decades, there's always been at least one and maybe more plausible major figures for Republicans headed into the presidential cycle; who would that be now? Lesser-known figures might realistically enter seriously into the mix.

Third: Kempthorne? interior secretary is a national post, but he's hardly a household name, and connections to the Bush Administration may be politically toxic for a while. He's been a down-the-line standard conservative, as the term has been understood in recent years; but how is that likely to help in 2012? He does have good campaigning skills, though, and as the Atlantic's Marc Ambinder points out, he is close to the natural resource industries, which could help fund the early stages of a campaign.

Would he try to do it? Not likely. The Idaho Statesman's Kevin Richert noted that "He has never said that to me and in recent talks with his associates no one made any suggestions that he was looking at it." This is probably a trial balloon being lofted for other purposes. But then, that's partly what trial balloons are for.