Back in Print! Four-term Senator Frank Church was one of the leading figures in the sweep of Idaho, and one of the most important U.S. senators of the last century. From developing wilderness areas to opposition to the Vietnam War to investigating the CIA, Church led on a host of difficult issues. This, the one serious biography of Church, originally published in 1994, has been brought back into print by Ridenbaugh Press.
Fighting the Odds: The Life of Senator Frank Church. LeRoy Ashby and Rod Gramer; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 800 pages. Softcover. $24.95.
See the FIGHTING THE ODDS page.


 

Jul 17 2014

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Balukoff offers to match campaign donations (Boise Statesman)
Smoke in Idaho’s skies from wildfires (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News)
Bergdahl status report: inquiry underway (Boise Statesman)
Simpson pushes potatoes for food program (IF Post Register)
Simpson, others help keep Dubois station open (IF Post Register)
Flooding in some parts of Rexburg (IF Post Register)
Heavy work for Washington fire fighters (Lewiston Tribune)
Cut lines interrupts net, phones in Lewiston (Lewiston Tribune)
Wheat crops looking good in this weather (Lewiston Tribune)
Heavy fires around the west (Moscow News)
WA state ballots available soon (Moscow News)
Pocatello road equipment at other cities (Pocatello Journal)

Wildfires roar on in Oregon, Northwest (KF Herald & News)
Considering partnership of SOU, Oregon Tech (KF Herald & News)
Fundraising deadline Dec 1 for civic stadium (Eugene Register Guard)
Ashland downtown kiosk will remain (Ashland Tidings)
SOU provost will retire (Ashland Tidings)
Medford still owns land under apartments (Medford Tribune)
Pendleton considers recovery center property (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Big fire near Heppner (Pendleton E Oregonian)
More Oregonians living in impoverished areas (Portland Oregonian)
ODOT manager files guilty plea on theft (Salem Statesman Journal)

Horseshoe Lake will be tested for norovirus (Bremerton Sun)
South Kitsap schools finances improving (Bremerton Sun)
Study shows foot ferry usage still large (Bremerton Sun)
Issues over Liias’ two jobs for Senate and city (Everett Herald)
Arlington code going after drugs, panhandling (Everett Herald)
US House okays banking for pot businesses (Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian, Olympian)
Inslee polling shows weak support (Olympian)
Obama will visit Seattle next week (Seattle Times)
Seattle home prices shooting high again (Seattle Times)
House seat in District 4 draws contest (Spokane Spokesman)
Big layoffs expected at Microsoft (Tacoma News Tribune)
Mass emergency declared over WA fires (Tacoma News Tribune)
Washington jobless rate falls again (Vancouver Columbian)
Oil shipping backer Tesoro funds GOP candidates (Vancouver Columbian)
Clark College may expand into Gorge (Vancouver Columbian)

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Jul 16 2014

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Warren Jones plans return from SLC hospital July 25 (Boise Statesman)
Big growing fire at Garden Valley (Boise Statesman)
Future of Dubois sheep station unclear (IF Post Register)
Nez Perce County runs out of transport funds (Lewiston Tribune)
Background check initiative does will in poll (Lewiston Tribune)
Pullman plans expansion work on fire station (Moscow News)
CWI board okays guns policy for campuses (Nampa Press Tribune)
Motion Industries moves from Boise to Caldwell (Nampa Press Tribune)
Massive Preacher fire still growing (TF Times News)
Labrador raises most cash among ID congressionals (TF Times News)

Cascades fire still roaring (Eugene Register Guard)
Swastika graffiti near UO Jewish fraternity (Eugene Register Guard)
Moccasin Hill fire hit fast and hard (KF Herald & News)
More timber production in OR than since 2006 (KF Herald & News)
First step at Ashland toward ending pot ban (Ashland Tidings)
Heat persisting in southern Oregon (Medford Tribune, Ashland Tidings)
Police linking string of arsons at Medford (Medford Tribune)
Transportation funding running dry (Pendleton E Oregonian)
More regs sought for oil rail transport (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Hurrcane Creek fire in Wallowas (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Oregon saw job loss in June (Portland Oregonian)
Top-two primary ballot issue qualifies (Salem Statesman Journal)

Everest College, seeking buyer, still has classes (Bremerton Sun)
Pot businesses start delivery service (Bremerton Sun)
Reviewing Kitsap prosecutors race (Bremerton Sun)
Boeing releases plan for 777X interior (Everett Herald)
Longview police want to add to force (Longview News)
Tickets from school traffic cams rose in 2013 (Longview News)
Kelso approves rules for addict shelters (Longview News)
Repair needs cited for Thurston bridges (Olympian)
Olympic peninsula opens first pot shop (Port Angeles News)
Major construction on I-90 will big big-impact (Seattle Times)
Chopp opposed by socialist candidate (Seattle Times)
Spokane commission candidate in review (Spokane Spokesman)
Tacoma charter amendments set for ballot (Tacoma News Tribune)
Fires roaring in central WA (Yakima Herald Republic)
Reviewing Yakima sheriff’s race (Yakima Herald Republic)
Yakima council may slice utility tax (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Jul 15 2014

A congressional success story

malloy CHUCK
MALLOY

 
In Idaho

Congress is doing a great job, and this is not a joke. Sure, there’s a lot of gridlock in Washington and on many issues, Congress can’t seem to agree on the color of the sky, let alone reach agreement on anything of substance.

But when it comes to diabetes awareness, and appropriating funds to cover research and prevention programs, it’s a different story. Funding for diabetes research, which was about $320 million in 1997, is now in the billions of dollars.

Support of this nature is significant to me, because I’ve had diabetes for more than 15 years and have experienced many of the complications. If we do nothing, it’s projected that one in three people will have diabetes by 2050. For a society, that is unacceptable.

None of this is lost on the members of Congress – specifically, three of the four members of Idaho’s congressional delegation. Sens. Jim Risch and Mike Crapo and Rep. Mike Simpson clearly “get it” on this issue. They are not working alone; 345 House members and 42 senators are members of diabetes caucuses. They have a deep understanding of the issue and the role Congress can play in fighting this disease.

“I’m no fan of federal spending, or creating a bigger government, but there is an appropriate role when it comes to certain expenditures,” Risch said. The National Institute of Health is one of those areas in which government does have a proper funding role.

“I’m a big fan of the NIH,” Risch said. “They perform miracles – arresting cancer on kids who are living normal and productive lives. Twenty-five years ago, or even 20 years ago, they were destined to die at an early age.” Continue Reading »

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Jul 15 2014

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Andrus recovering from lung tumor operation (Boise Statesman, Lewiston Tribune)
Bergdahl not yet seen parents (Boise Statesman, TF Times News)
New emergency dispatch center planned for Ada (Boise Statesman)
Nez Perce-Clearwater forest plan released (Lewiston Tribune)
Possible roundabouts in Asotin road plans (Lewiston Tribune)
Asotin County considers possible new sheriffs (Lewiston Tribune)
Moscow budget proposed for next year (Moscow News)
New mayor Nathan Leigh chosen at Parma (Nampa Press Tribune)
Caldwell I-84 work lacks funds until 2019 (Nampa Press Tribune)
Heavy wildfires in southern Idaho (Boise Statesman, Pocatello Journal)
Reconstruction plans for downtown Twin Falls (TF Times News)

Fires spreading around region (Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Tribune, KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Drawings of a new Eugene city hall shown (Eugene Register Guard)
Gradual change to Oregon place names (KF Herald & News)
Possible record high temp at Medford (Medford Tribune, Ashland Tidings)
Ashland looks at film permit fees (Ashland Tidings)
Background on oil train shipping (Portland Oregonian)
OR, WA lead in traffic death declines (Portland Oregonian)
Many state voter profiles are in error (Salem Statesman Journal)

Tulalips using federal domestic violence program (Everett Herald)
High temperatures continuing (Spokane Spokesman, Kennewick Herald)
Moses Lake will house Mitsibishi test site (Kennewick Herald)
Many workplaces still critical of pot (Longview News)
Former St. John hospital leader dies (Longview News)
Reviewing Clallam air quality (Port Angeles News)
Reviewing Airbus v Boeing (Seattle Times)
County treasurer race turns on finance experience (Spokane Spokesman)
Vancouver maneuvers on oil trains (Vancouver Columbian)
Columbia Land Trust restoring 9,000 acres (Vancouver Columbian)
Campaigns for Yakima Co clerk (Yakima Herald Republic)
State seeks local funds for ’13 firefighting (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Jul 14 2014

Governor JVE, RIP

carlson CHRIS
CARLSON

 
Carlson
Chronicles

Think of it this way: without a John V. Evans there never would have been an Interior Secretary named Cecil D. Andrus.

Why? Because Cece never would have left Idaho and given up the governor’s chair to a Republican Lieutenant Governor, especially one named Vernon Ravenscroft.

Idaho’s 27th governor passed away last week at the age of 89. Most of the media accounts dutifully noted the former Mayor and State Senator from Malad, who had defeated Ravenscroft in the 1974 general election, did a solid job in the governorship. He was twice re-elected in his own right and his ten years in the governorship is the third longest service of any Idaho governor.

Some noted that this fine record, however, has been forgotten because Evans had the misfortune of being the meat between the two fine slices of bread represented by Cece’s first stint as governor (1971-1977) and his return engagement (1987-1995).

In death though, Evans received some of his overdue “due.” Most newspapers around the state did note some of his major accomplishments, for example, during tougher economic times than Andrus experienced he maintained strong support for public education by slashing state spending elsewhere and having the courage to support some reasonable tax increase.

He also along with then Attorney General and now Supreme Court Justice Jim Jones, negotiated the precedent setting agreement with Idaho Power which established minimum stream flows on the Snake River for power generation and required the basin-wide adjudication of Snake River water rights.

Evans further marshalled all the state resources one could muster to assist the Silver Valley when it suffered the devastating loss of 2200 jobs when the Bunker Hill Mine and Smelter in Kellogg shut down. Evans was one of those rare public office holders who truly cared about people and the daily challenges most must meet.

He considerably expanded the “Capital for A Day” program which Cece had initiated in 1973.

Under the Andrus model it was just Cece and I walking Main Street of a county seat. Usually we stopped by the Main Street Drug, the busiest looking café, the local super market, a gas station or two—we’d even walk into a bar or two.

Then we’d speak to a local Kiwanis Club or Rotary at noon. In the afternoon we’d drop by the local newspaper and the local radio station to report on what we’d heard from their friends and neighbors. If it was a weekly we’d meet with the publisher. If it was a daily we’d meet with their ed board and Boise Statehouse reporter.

Evans began the practice of taking selected state agency directors and added the component of a town hall meeting to the format. It is the Evans model that current Governor C. L. “Butch” Otter adopted. Continue Reading »

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Jul 14 2014

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

More foothills trails planned for Boise (Boise Statesman)
Plans for more fuel-efficient Lewiston police (Lewiston Tribune)
Will Congress object to closure of shee station? (TF Times News)

Ashland was end its moratorium on pot shops (Ashland Tidings)
Oregon observing Washington’s pot experience (Salem Statesman Journal)
Salem gradually redevelops Boise site (Salem Statesman Journal)
Reviewing BLM, Bundy situation and Oregon (Portland Oregonian)

Pastors sue Marysville on sex offender program (Everett Herald)
Lightning may add to central WA fires (Kennewick Herald)
Olympic peninsula growth slows (Port Angeles News)
Objections to failing grades for schools (Port Angeles News)
Japan aircraft maker builds Moses Lake test center (Seattle Times)
Spokane may cut speeds on U.S 2 (Spokane Spokesman)
District 6 Senate race may be expensive (Spokane Spokesman)
New research projects ahead at WSU (Spokane Spokesman)
Big Naches fire burns (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Jul 13 2014

In the Briefings

holmes at store
 
Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes joined other major I-502 sponsors at noon Tuesday at the opening of Cannabis City, the first of Seattle’s allotted 21 retail marijuana stores to open. Holmes became the fourth person to make a purchase at Cannabis City – two packages of two grams each of “OG Pearl.”
“Just over three years ago I stood with Alison Holcomb in Seattle’s Central Public Library to announce the launch of what became Initiative 502, to legalize, regulate and tax marijuana for adult recreational use,” Holmes said. “Now I’m honored to stand with Alison again at the opening of the very first I-502 store in Seattle, Cannabis City.” Holcomb was the architect of the I-502 campaign while Holmes was a prime sponsor. (Photo/Office of the Seattle City Attorney)

 

Summer has finally arrived, in some force, with hotter temperatures than up to now – and hotter in most places than normal for this point in July. With the outbreak of mid-sized wildfires around the region, there’s some concern growing about fire risk and about water supplies.

The big Washington story was, of course, the opening of several state-legalized pot shops; Oregon and Idaho saw less dominant stories in the week after Independence Day.

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Jul 13 2014

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Speaker Bedke may be challenged this year (Boise Statesman, IF Post Register, Lewiston Tribune)
Lewiston cops write most speeding tickets in area (Lewiston Tribune)
Low prices for potatoes this season (Pocatello Journal)
Panhandle mental health options few (Sandpoint Bee)
Burley airport falling short of standards (TF Times News)
Police find new ways to work with mentally ill (TF Times News)
Fish & Game Commission opposing White Clouds monument (TF Times News)

Drought moving wild horses to private land (KF Herald & News)
Medford councilor Karen Blair dies (Medford Tribune)
Recent Jackson Co marriage license 12% same-sex (Medford Tribune)
Many abandoned homes taken over by squatters (Portland Oregonian)
New Salem school superintendent settles in (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bremerton emergency levy on ballot yet again (Bremerton Sun)
Sockeye coming back to Skokomish River (Bremerton Sun)
Two towns seek to treat waste water (Everett Herald)
Entiat fire burns more than 20,000 acres (Seattle Times)
Studying Airbus and its moves on Boeing (Seattle Times)
A look at the 5th US House race (Spokane Spokesman)
A look at the 10th US House primary (Tacoma News Tribune)
Clark County affirms – no pot production (Vancouver Columbian)
Grays Harbor considers oil train shipping (Vancouver Columbian)
A look at the 4th US House contest (Yakima Herald Republic)
DEA looks at medical pot users with guns (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Jul 12 2014

Two lessons from Pete Holmes

idaho RANDY
STAPILUS
 
Washington

Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes, who hasn’t been a notably high-profile figure during his time in office – bearing in mind that his office automatically has some visibility – delivered two shockers, both in the form of highly useful lessons, last week. He got plenty of attention for both, attention sought out in one case and ruefully unsought in the other.

The first was his surprise appearance at Cannabis City, Seattle’s first (legal) shop catering to recreational marijuana sales, on its opening morning. He was there early, and became the store’s fourth customer, buying two small bags of product. His presence wasn’t stunning in an absolute sense, since Holmes had been a strong and clear advocate for marijuana legalization; but then, not all legalization advocates are necessarily going to be customers of Cannabis city and its bretheren. Holmes said that one of his purchases was intended to be a keepsake, and the other – he suggestion – was intended for consumption.

This brief incident was captured on film (television cameras were there), and a picture of Holmes making a buy illegal under law in 48 other states was promptly posted on his official city web page. It’s hard to imagine an image that more specifically or powerfully highlights how far the move toward legalization – and its social acceptability – has come.

Well, to a point.

Failing to think through (as an attorney should) the legal implications of what he was doing, a busy Holmes carried his bags back to his office at city hall. Soon after he was confronted with an unwelcome reality: Bringing marijuana into city hall (a “drug-free workplace”), and having it available during working hours, were contrary to city code. The code Holmes’ job is supposed to enforce.
He fessed up soon after, said his mea culpas and offered to donate $3,000 (which would equate to a hefty fine) to the Downtown Emergency Service Center as penance.

Thereby providing a demonstration that although Washington has legalized the bud, its use and possession still are not exactly a wide-open matter. And will not be, at least for some time to come.

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Jul 12 2014

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Heavy construction ahead on I-84 (Boise Statesman)
Services for former Governor Evans (Boise Statesman)
IF youth developments gets $400k grant (IF Post Register)
Asotin sheriff quits August 1 (Lewiston Tribune)
UI installing more traffic calming projects (Lewiston Tribune)
Nampa taffic patterns will shift (Nampa Press Tribune)
New wineries in Caldwell business incubator (Nampa Press Tribune)
Boating limited at a lower Lake Lowell (Nampa Press Tribune)
Who plays for cleanup on sewer-backed houses? (Pocatello Journal)
TF seeks improved bicycle access (TF Times News)

About 45k visit Oregon Country Fair (Eugene Register Guard)
Hotter weather coming in next few days (Eugene Register Guard)
School’s sports field nearly done (KF Herald & News)
Low water worries lead to bottled water scam (Ashland Tidings)
Medford officials plan Vietnam memorial (Medford Tribune)
Proposed natural gas plants to stabilize juice (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Dentist regulators make discipline info less available (Portland Oregonian)
Walnut trees at state hospital dying (Salem Statesman Journal)

Temperatures in the 90s are ahead (Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian, Bremerton Sun)
Starbucks approved for Bainbridge Island (Bremerton Sun)
Renovation funds could come for Mukilteo terminal (Everett Herald)
Inslee touts Washington at air show (Everett Herald)
District 4 congressional race turning ugly (Kennewick Herald)
Hastings urges protections on medical pot (Kennewick Herald)
More wildlfires in Washington (Vancouver Columbian, Kennewick Herald)
Pot shops have run out of pot (Longview News)
Employers still can impose pot limits (Seattle Times)
State’s first license pot grower selling out (Spokesman Review)
Overview of pot marketplace (Tacoma News Tribune)
Portland quit free parking for disabled (Vancouver Columbian)

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Jul 11 2014

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

New apartments planned for former trailer park (Boise Statesman)
Sugar-Salem schools may see cuts (IF Post Register)
New manager of transit in Pullman (Moscow News)
Charter school buys Caldwell land for auditorium (Nampa Press Tribune)
Democrats hold livable wage rally at Caldwell (Nampa Press Tribune)
Two legislative Democratic candidates drop out (Pocatello Journal)
Massive spontaneous explosion of alfalfa at Hansen (TF Times News)

Eugene cops kept list of disliked people? (Eugene Register Guard)
KF downtown getting bike corrals (KF Herald & News)
Oregon Caves monument may expand by 4,000 acres (Medford Tribune, Ashland Tidings)
Reviewing the adult business collection at Umatilla (Pendleton E Oregonian)
New travel time reader boards set by ODOT (Portland Oregonian)

Kitsap library plans new Silverdale branch (Bremerton Sun)
BrewFest at Bremerton gets new location (Bremerton Sun)
Still searching for the last Oso victim (Everett Herald)
Everett says Kimberly Clark cleanup not yet done (Everett Herald)
Big wildfire growing fast near Entiat (Kennewick Herald)
Pot remains in short supply at stores (Seattle Times, Longview News)
High court: bicyclist box not subject to search (Longview News)
Inslee pushes increase in fish consumption (Port Angeles News)
STDs spreading more rapidly (Spokane Spokesman)
Sockeye salmon have record run at Bonneville (Spokane Spokesman)
Fire balloons at Lake Spokane (Spokane Spokesman, Tacoma News Tribune)
Vancouver opens second pot store (Vancouver Columbian)
Heat rising quickly in region (Yakima Herald Republic)
Yakima council member proposed utility tax cut (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Jul 11 2014

Shut the hell up, Sarah

rainey BARRETT
RAINEY

 
Second
Thoughts

I’ve wanted to do a column under that headline for five years now. Even got to the keyboard a few times but held back. Really don’t know why. Lord knows she’s given any thinking person a pot full of reasons to tell her to “take a hike.” But now it appears she’s pissed off more than half the country and a majority just wants her to shut up and go away.

A new NBC/Wall Street/Annenberg poll has found 54-percent of voters – regardless of party – have heard enough of the Wasilla wastrel. Even four-in-ten Republicans don’t want to hear her uninformed babbling anymore. Among Democrats the margin is two-thirds.

But it’s not just the self-serving Alaskan opportunist the public is fed up with. More than half the respondents are tired of hearing Rev. Jesse Jackson’s opinions on this, that and the other. Nearly half would like former Vice President Cheney to put a sock in it and go silently back to Wyoming with about 43% saying “enough already” to Newt Gingrich.

Aside from being just plain without talent or knowledge enough to make any sort of meaningful contribution to the national dialogue, Palin’s problem – and to some extent the others – is the result of several things. First, none of those named has any legitimate public platform. All did at one time. But no more. They have no substance and nothing relevant to say. They’ve worn out their welcome.

Second, the media made them “personalities.” As such, they have nothing meaningful to contribute. No public office. No institutional connection. No platform of any kind. They’re just supposed to be opinionated, funny, crusty, say controversial things, be available and show up.

Think all the people you know. You know lots of folks. But are they all friends? Do you invite all these folks to your house? Do you even want all of them at your house? Probably not. Oh, you may work with some, socialize with some, go to church with some. But are they all people you want to hang out with all the time? Probably not. People come and go in our lives but few relationships stay. Those that do are based on something more than “personality.”

The media has “made” these people – Palin, Gingrich, Jackson et al. Not because they’re good, upstanding, honest folk with something important to say. No. They’ve made them “personalities” to fill long stretches of what would otherwise be “dead air” or empty pages because they can be counted on to be controversial or entertaining if not illuminating or meaningful. They’re creatures of the media and, when they no longer can bring ratings or subscriptions numbers, they’ll be discarded by that same media. Old news.

Palin, in particular, is nothing more than a media “personality.” She’s offered nothing positive or important to the national dialogue since you first heard her name six years ago. She’s a creation: partly by the media but mostly by her own hand. When the national spotlight accidentally shined on her in 2008 – at the behest of a confused John McCain – she was ready. Immediately ignoring McCain speech writers and political advisers much smarter than her, freelancing interviews without campaign approval, copywriting her name and image and signing a long-term contract with a major speaker’s bureau before the campaign was over, Palin grabbed the brass ring. The media loved her. Well, more like developed a case of heavy breathing. Continue Reading »

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Jul 10 2014

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Nampa okays new traffic pattern and library (Boise Statesman)
Big new Broadway Ford building in IF (IF Post Register)
Iona in forced annexation battle (IF Post Register)
Simpson on stringer EPA arsenic standards (IF Post Register)
More time for ice skating rink lease (Lewiston Tribune)
Teacher shortage growing in Washington (Moscow News)
Pullman tries to use more green eneregy (Moscow News)
District court at Latah puts in budget request (Moscow News)
Searching for new College of Idaho president (Nampa Press Tribune)
Money heads into anti-wolf program (Nampa Press Tribune)
Road work leads to sewage overflows (Pocatello Journal)
School bond narrowly fails at North Gem (Pocatello Journal)
Hunters opposing White Clouds monument (TF Times News)
Transportation Department hit will asbestos fine (TF Times News)

Road work will worsen Eugene traffic (Eugene Register Guard)
Blue Mountain Recovery Center may be demolished (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Higher salary for new Cover Oregon leader (Portland Oregonian)

Port Orchards rejects pot sale restrictions (Bremerton Sun)
Inslee proposes new water quality plan (Spokane Spokesman, Everett Herald, Yakima Herald Republic)
John Koster reviewing his county ombudsman role (Everett Herald)
Reynolds smelter buildings at Longview demolished (Longview News)
Mass of air samples tested at Hanford (Kennewick Herald)
Port Angeles business groups consider unity (Port Angeles News)
Short supply in pot stores (Seattle Times)
First Spokane pot buyer now without a job (Spokane Spokesman)
Shipping firm back at Tacoma after 31 years (Tacoma News Tribune)
Vancouver marijuana shop opens doors (Vancouver Columbian)
More complaints about fireworks this year (Vancouver Columbian)

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Jul 09 2014

John Evans

idaho RANDY
STAPILUS
 
Idaho

For a while after he became governor in 1977, John V. Evans became known among some Idaho political writers as the Rodney Dangerfield of governors: He couldn’t get no respect – and that was the headline of a column at the time.

Anecdotes flew around. He was the lieutenant governor who put gas in his car tank, forgot his wallet at home, and promised the attendant he would run right back and get it and pay. Not good enough: The lieutenant governor had to leave his watch as collateral. (Evans had a good enough sense of humor that none of this seemed to bother him.)

As governor, there was an optics issue too. He took the office not by election but by elevation, after the charismatic Cecil Andrus had been named interior secretary. Evans had a lot to live up to, and he lacked Andrus’ magnetism.

But by the time of Evans’ passing this week, perspectives changed – a lot. He gets a good deal of respect now and for good reason.

John Evans held office during one of Idaho’s tougher economic periods, and when much of the bigger picture of Idaho politics, on partisan, social and philosophical levels, was turning against him. He still won election to the job twice, the second time over a man (Phil Batt) who more than a decade later did become governor; he came very close to winning a race for the U.S. Senate. (All that followed a closely contested run for lieutenant governor in 1974.)

Evans could fairly be considered one of Idaho’s strongest governors. He was a highly skilled politician (first elected to the state Senate in the Republican year of 1952 from Republican Oneida County), a far better campaigner than many people credited him for, and he could be a partisan leader when occasion arose. Republicans long remembered how many previous governors would simply sign a veto of legislation, but Evans brought out a big red veto stamp to make his point.

My memories of his time in office come from another angle: Alongside the self-confidence (which any successful politician must have) was an evidently genuine humility and kindness. Few major public offices I have ever seen were as open as his; the door of his office was nearly always open, allowing for inquiring reporters or anyone else to see exactly what the governor was up to at any given moment.

One day I asked to spend a day with the governor, from breakfast until he got home from work. That sort of story isn’t totally unique, but what was unusual was this: I wasn’t kicked out of anything, any meetings or deliberations at all, all day. That was not the kind of openness you saw in just about anyone else’s administration. Continue Reading »

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Jul 09 2014

Remembering Evans

peterson MARTIN
PETERSON
 

John Evans left the governorship in 1987 – 27 years ago. Roughly two-thirds of Idaho’s current population were either under the age of eighteen or not even born yet when he left office. Given Evans’ low public profile after leaving office, it isn’t surprising that many Idahoans don’t recall his many years of public service. Many of them probably associate him more closely as the face in advertisements for D.L. Evans Bank.

John Evans grew up in Malad. His grandfather David L. Evans served in the territorial legislature and, following statehood was Speaker of the House. Like his grandfather, John Evans was a Democrat and a banker. He was elected to the state senate in 1952, at the age of 27. In 1957, when the Democrats took control of the Senate, he became senate majority leader. He left the senate in 1959 and was elected mayor of Malad.

His years as a small town mayor, rancher and banker provided him with invaluable experience and skills that would serve him well when he returned to state government, again serving as a senator, then lieutenant governor and finally ten years as governor.

When Cecil Andrus resigned as governor to become Secretary of Interior in 1977, Evans became governor. His ten years as governor were during some of the most challenging times that Idaho has ever faced. In 1978 Idaho voters approved the 1% Initiative, which placed substantial restrictions on the ability of local governments to raise operating revenues. Then came the economic collapse. The state’s economy had little diversification and was heavily dependent upon natural resource based industries. In a perfect storm, the bottom dropped out of the timber, mining and agricultural industries. As a result, state tax revenues plummeted.

Using his experience as a mayor, Evans understood the need for basic governmental services at the state and local levels. As a mayor, he also understood the need for setting priorities and operating in a fiscally conservative manner. The result was a mixture of reducing non-essential services, cutting operating costs and increasing the flow of state revenues. He also created the Idaho Department of Commerce to help begin Idaho’s economic rebuilding. With a legislature heavily dominated by Republicans and led by staunch conservatives such as Tom Stivers in the house and Jim Risch in the senate, Evans had his work cut out for him. But he rose to the occasion, working with a coalition of Democrats and moderate Republicans, he kept the ship afloat and laid the groundwork for an economic recovery that led to some of the best years that Idaho’s economy has ever seen. In many ways, his relationship with a Republican legislature was more productive than that of some Republican governors. Continue Reading »

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Two bulls fire near Bend, and defensible space.

 

JOURNEY WEST

by Stephen Hartgen
The personal story of the well-known editor, publisher and state legislator's travel west from Maine to Idaho. A well-written account for anyone interested in Idaho, journalism or politics.
JOURNEY WEST: A memoir of journalism and politics, by Stephen Hartgen; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, here or at Amazon.com (softcover)

 

 

NEW EDITIONS is the story of the Northwest's 226 general-circulation newspapers and where your newspaper is headed.
New Editions: The Northwest's Newspapers as They Were, Are and Will Be. Steve Bagwell and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 324 pages. Softcover. (e-book ahead). $16.95.
See the NEW EDITIONS page.

How many copies?

 
THE OREGON POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

The Field Guide is the reference for the year on Oregon politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Compiled by a long-time Northwest political writer and a Salem Statesman-Journal political reporter.
OREGON POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Hannah Hoffman; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
THE IDAHO POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase is the reference for the year on Idaho Politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Written by two of Idaho's most veteran politcal observers.
IDAHO POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
without compromise
WITHOUT COMPROMISE is the story of the Idaho State Police, from barely-functioning motor vehicles and hardly-there roads to computer and biotechnology. Kelly Kast has spent years researching the history and interviewing scores of current and former state police, and has emerged with a detailed and engrossing story of Idaho.
WITHOUT COMPROMISE page.

 

Diamondfield
How many copies?
The Old West saw few murder trials more spectacular or misunderstood than of "Diamondfield" Jack Davis. After years of brushes with the noose, Davis was pardoned - though many continued to believe him guilty. Max Black has spent years researching the Diamondfield saga and found startling new evidence never before uncovered - including the weapon and one of the bullets involved in the crime, and important documents - and now sets out the definitive story. Here too is Black's story - how he found key elements, presumed lost forever, of a fabulous Old West story.
See the DIAMONDFIELD page for more.
 

Medimont Reflections Chris Carlson's Medimont Reflections is a followup on his biography of former Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus. This one expands the view, bringing in Carlson's take on Idaho politics, the Northwest energy planning council, environmental issues and much more. The Idaho Statesman: "a pull-back-the-curtain account of his 40 years as a player in public life in Idaho." Available here: $15.95 plus shipping.
See the Medimont Reflections page  
 
Idaho 100 NOW IN KINDLE
 
Idaho 100, about the 100 most influential people ever in Idaho, by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson is now available. This is the book about to become the talk of the state - who really made Idaho the way it is? NOW AN E-BOOK AVAILABLE THROUGH KINDLE for just $2.99. Or, only $15.95 plus shipping.
 

Idaho 100 by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson. Order the Kindle at Amazon.com. For the print edition, order here or at Amazon.


 

    Top-Story-graphic-300x200_topstory8
    Monday mornings on KLIX-AM

    watergates

    ORDER IT HERE or on Amazon.com

    More about this book by Randy Stapilus

    Water rights and water wars: They’re not just a western movie any more. The Water Gates reviews water supplies, uses and rights to use water in all 50 states.242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

    intermediary

    ORDER IT HERE or on Amazon.com

    More about this book by Lin Tull Cannell

    At a time when Americans were only exploring what are now western states, William Craig tried to broker peace between native Nez Perces and newcomers from the East. 15 years in the making, this is one of the most dramatic stories of early Northwest history. 242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

    Upstream

    ORDER HERE or Amazon.com

    The Snake River Basin Adjudication is one of the largest water adjudications the United States has ever seen, and it may be the most successful. Here's how it happened, from the pages of the SRBA Digest, for 16 years the independent source.

    Paradox Politics

    ORDER HERE or Amazon.com

    After 21 years, a 2nd edition. If you're interested in Idaho politics and never read the original, now's the time. If you've read the original, here's view from now.


    Governing Idaho:
    Politics, People and Power

    by James Weatherby
    and Randy Stapilus
    Caxton Press
    order here

    Outlaw Tales
    of Idaho

    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here

    It Happened in Idaho
    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here

    Camping Idaho
    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here