Archive for the 'Oregon' Category

Oct 12 2013

Among the accumulants

Published by under Oregon,Oregon column

oregon
RANDY STAPILUS / Oregon

Not long ago the talk here was that hardly any names had surfaced – other than the incumbent’s – for the 2014 U.S. Senate contest in Oregon. That incumbent, Democrat Jeff Merkley, is widely assumed to be planning a re-election campaign, though he hasn’t formally announced.

Considering that Senate seat was held before Merkley’s election in 2008 by Republicans (actually, two Republicans) going back to 1966, you might think on the surface that plenty of prominent names would rise up to run. Hasn’t been the case.

There were no such contenders at all on the Republican side until mid-august, when Albany financial planner (and a former Republican chair in Linn county) Jo Rae Perkins said on Facebook that she plannned to run. Maybe that was a signal that experience getting elected to, well, anything, wasn’t needed to run for the U.S. Senate. A neurosurgeon from Portland, Monica Wehby, sais she would enter too, last week. On October 7 a businessman from Bend named Sam Carpenter said he too may run.

There is, among the various prospects, one with actual elective experience who appears likely to announce soon, he being Republican state Representative Jason Conger of Bend. He is planning a series of announcements on October 15, at Bend and Oregon City, the sort of setup that usually indicates an actual announcement for major office. (It did for Merkley six years ago.)

Conger, who actually is an experienced candidate and has done such things as raise money, would seem to be the likely frontrunner among the Republicans at this point. His history doesn’t suggest any special obstacles (or unusual advantages either) for the race. As he is no doubt aware, of course, he’s running in an uphill situation, in a state which has been moving in a gentle but clear pattern favoring blue rather than red candidates.

But he may want to take care. If the gaggle of Republican candidates stays in, and some others of them get more attention – maybe not the helpful kind – than Conger gets, his nomination may not be assured. And if that attention is really not good, it could do his nomination some damage even assuming he gets it.

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Oct 02 2013

Table-clearing

Published by under Oregon,Oregon column

oregon
RANDY STAPILUS / Oregon

UPDATE: Reflecting on the difference between Congress and the Oregon Legislature – well, it’s night and day. As for the Oregon Legislature, Governor John Kitzhaber said, “This is what working government and leadership look like, with people from across the state finding balanced solutions to real problems.” Washington could learn from Salem. …

Only a couple of days ago, this Oregon near-miracle was widely described as falling apart: A grand bargain including ideas (tax law changes) Democrats wanted, others (PERS adjustments substantially beyond last session’s) sought by Republicans, and other pieces not terribly popular anywhere. Pieces in all, though, much sought after by many.

It was the great white whale of the regular legislation session this year. For months, legislative leaders met with Governor John Kitzhaber, who had proposed something resembling (though not exactly the same as) this in his state of the state address, and it was a revolving exercise in frustration. Repeatedly, the details of a deal that would collect enough votes in both chamber seemed to be just about there; just as repeatedly, it kept falling short.

Kitzhaber did not give up, however, and took his case for a grand bargain on state finances around the state, and into ongoing legislative negotiations. Calling the session was no done deal, and even after it was called reports kept leaking out that it might fall short enough votes, Last weekend, after initial hearings on the pieces (on “legislative concepts”) things seemed about to fall apart again.

That they did not this time is remarkable, and it may have some significant political effects down the road.

One involves Kitzhaber, who was the favorite for a fourth term – if he wants it – from the beginning. But success on this special session was thought likely to be a nudge toward another term, and could make him all but impregnable. This PERS/tax deal is – recognizing that the work on taxes and retirement isn’t done yet – something sought after for more than a decade, and many people had wondered if it was even possible. Turns out it is. Kitzhaber’s third term has been an astonishingly productive gubernatorial term, and the reality of that should not be a hard sell.

Linked to that are two other elements: The removal from the table, as hot political issues, two matters which looked to be big deals on the legislative stump.

Those are the PERS structuring and tax increases that afford more money to the public schools. Republicans were set to go to war on the first, and Democrats on the second. This special session does not remove those topics from discussion, but it takes the heat, and the air, out of them. PERS now has been substantially revised, not as much as many Republicans would like but probably to a point most Oregonians overall would find reasonable. Similarly, attempts to raise taxes on the Democratic side should at least be paused; the largest needs (if not, to be sure, all of them) now are addressed.

Oregon is a politically different place than it was a couple of days ago. And 2014 is likely to be different, too, as a result.

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Sep 18 2013

Perspective in the woods

Published by under Oregon,Oregon column

oregon
RANDY STAPILUS / Oregon

Roseburg, Oregon, called by one Ridenbaugh Press writer (who lives there) “our little village in the woods,” would seem to be an unlikely locus for a regional financial powerhouse.

And yet here we are. Umpqua Bank, which (surely with some amusement) calls its “The World’s Greatest Bank,” is becoming one of the Northwest’s largest. It already is the largest bank based in Oregon, and with the acquisition of Sterling Bank of Spokane is poised to become the largest or second-largest locally-owned bank in the Northwest.

It may do well to remember how it got there.

If it sloganeers its greatness, it seems to have remembered in recent years that it stayed standing, and prospered, while others faltered, in large part because it stuck to the knitting. By many accounts, including a number of regional best-of lists, it is widely considered one of the best places to bank and even one of the best places to work. (A note: We have no connection to Umpqua.)

Umpqua has grown steadily over the years, and now seems to be taking major leaps. It recently opened a store in downtown San Francisco – was that a purely business-based decision or was there some ego in it? – and now prepares to absorb Sterling, which has many branches, many in small towns, around the Northwest. The combination will include some but not massive overlap; the end result will great extend Umpqua’s reach.

Already a substantial regional player, it is about to get much bigger and move onto a new level. Now a new challenge will emerge: Will it be able to hand on to the positive qualities that got it to this point? It’s a point at which many businesses stumble.

Perhaps Umpqua can learn from their lessons. It can be calm and contemplative in Roseburg.

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Sep 09 2013

Complexity in the resignation

Published by under Oregon,Oregon column

oregon
RANDY STAPILUS / Oregon

There’s something about Multnomah County’s process of replacing members of its commission that, it would seem, could use some work.

The county’s top office holder is its commission chair, a position specifically elected by the public and not chosen from among the commission members or rotated around. (In that, there’s some similarity with Portland’s mayoral job.) But what happens when that person leaves?
For most elective positions, the idea would be that other elective office holders would make the decision about filling it until the voters do. In many instances, in many states, governors do a lot of that sort of thing, and Oregon does it in some cases (most often, judges). But not in this case.

In the case of Jeff Cogen, the chair leaving under heavily embattled conditions (people in Portland know about the infamous affair with a county employee), the replacement will be – his chief of staff, a person unknown to most people in the county and not named by anyone external.

Then the job will be filled in two steps. An elected replacement will be picked after the primary election next May (yes, that’s the better part of a year away). But that will be for a temporary term. Coinciding with that, campaigns and elections will go on to fill the job for a regular four-year term; the election to settle that will be held in November 2014. So there could be four county chairs (starting with Cogen) over the next year and four months.

You’d think there’d be a more logical system than this. But then, Portland Multnomah County do like their peculiar systems in governmental organization.

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Sep 01 2013

An opening door

idaho RANDY
STAPILUS
 
Idaho

Since Washington and Colorado voters last year chose to create a legal marketplace for marijuana, and other nearby states like Idaho watched closely – or, like Oregon, positioned themselves to follow suit – the big question has been: What will the federal government do?

Marijuana is still banned under federal law, and nothing in the law stops federal officials and agents from swooping into Washington and Colorado (and any followup states) allowing for legal consumption, and imprisoning, at least in theory, a whole lot of people for doing something their states have okayed.

There’s also this, however: Law enforcement officials, and prosecutors, always have made choices about which laws to enforce, and how. There are far too many laws on the books, too many infractions, misdemeanors, and even felonies to even consider trying to enforce them all with equal force. (I once asked a veteran Idaho legislative staffer how many felony offenses are on the books in Idaho, and he had no idea.) Talk privately to a cop or a prosecutor, and they’ll probably acknowledge a kind of triage: usually, they enforce strenuously laws aimed at protecting people from some kind of specific harm. Murder and other violent crime, for example, are very high priority, which seems to make sense.

When Attorney General Eric Holder on Thursday issued his department’s policy on marijuana in the age of state legalization, he seemed to bear that concept in mind. As an operating principle, he said, the department would let Washington and Colorado (and other states) do their thing on “marijuana-related conduct” – but he also provided a collection of eight red flags that might draw in federal responses.

Those “enforcement priorities”, listed in a “memorandum for all United States attorneys”, include keeping pot from being distributed to minors; keeping money from marijuana sales out of the hands of criminal elements; keeping pot from seeping out of smoking states to non-smoking states; keeping legal market activity from being used as a cover for illegal activity; preventing violence or use of firearms in cultivation and distribution; preventing drugged driving; avoiding grows on public lands; and barring marijuana use on federal lands.

In deciding whether the feds should jump in, the memo said, “The primary question in all cases – and in all jurisdictions – should be whether the conduct at issue implicates one or more of the enforcement priorities listed above.”

The point might be made, though it wasn’t explicitly by the department, that all these things already have been happening under prohibition, and that a legal market regime might be best judged not by absolute compliance but by improvement.

Still, while the new federal rule is a long way from an open free-for-all – a totally free marketplace? – it has set down for the first time a set of rules under which states could legalize without risk of federal pre-emption. That may be important.

It’s likely, for example, to increase the odds (already favorable) that Oregon will vote for legalization next year, since the terms of federal cooperation now are a lot clearer.

And for Idaho, the question will arise: How can Washington (and maybe Oregon, and conceivably Nevada too) draw the line at their border so that legal pot doesn’t cross to the Gem State? Does the border at Idaho, totally porous without any slowdowns to the west now, start to sprout checkpoints and enhanced law enforcement?

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Aug 24 2013

Radio silence

Published by under Oregon,Oregon column

oregon
RANDY STAPILUS / Oregon

You can get the point behind the decision by the Eugene Police to quit running their radio transmissions over open air, available to all – including, of course, available to the transgressors they’re trying to catch.

Presumably, though, you would think there are ways around the real issues without going totally silent.

There are legitimate concerns. Cops would understandably not want to broadcast (literally) their moves when they’re trying to accomplish something by stealth. Private information, including such data as Social Security numbers, sometimes go out over those signals, as well as the names of people who may be guilty of nothing but become involved in something the police are doing.

And the Eugene Police apparently are providing a mechanism for news organizations to continue to track their signals.

Still. Putting aside the hobbyists, the people who simply enjoy being plugged in to whatever the police do, there are other reasons for allowing open air here. Foremost among them is allowing the public to keep tabs on their employees, employees who are given license to use force and violence on occasion. (That’s one reason among others why the growth in police video has some real merit.) What are these enforcers doing out there? Tune in and you can find out.

It may make a difference too for the officers themselves. People tend to act a little differently when they know they’re, as it were, on stage.

This circle should be squarable. There ought to be ways to allow much of the transmission to go public – surely most of it can be heard any anyone with no harm done – and then encrypt whenever there’s good reason to do that.

Technology should allow this to be not entirely an either-or situation.

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Aug 16 2013

Art Robinson. Really?

Published by under Oregon,Rainey

rainey BARRETT
RAINEY

 
Second
Thoughts

Leadership of Oregon’s Republican Party has finally taken the fatal leap off the edge of its own square world, guaranteeing itself a place in obscurity for the foreseeable future. The inmates are in charge of the asylum.

Folks overseeing what’s left of our old Oregon GOP have put a knife to their own throats. That instrument is a guy totally unqualified to make the Party a viable choice for most voters. A stunning decision!

Art Robinson not only has failed multiple times as a candidate for office in our little piece of heaven – he’s also become synonymous with whacko philosophies and nut case ideas. He may have a PhD in some scientific field. But he’s repeatedly demonstrated – when it comes to politics and political philosophy – he’s totally uneducated.

From his little compound in the Oregon woods, Robinson has made a living selling home school materials containing many ideas sure to pollute the normal educational growth of the unsuspecting. He’s also challenged – without facts – two Oregon institutions of higher learning in more than one fit of perceived persecution of himself or his family. He twice failed miserably in his own runs to beat Rep. Pete DeFazio. He backed a ludicrous attempt to use one of his sons as a hand puppet to defeat DeFazio in a “Democrat” primary. “Lipstick on a pig” as has famously been stated by another Republican nut case.

Robinson’s made a fool of himself locally, statewide and nationally in various public appearances. Trying to trace his illogical thinking is akin to trying to follow strands of spaghetti on a full plate. He’s infamously written down some of his nuttier philosophy. Then, when challenged, falsely accused more than one inquisitor of quoting him out of context.

At risk to your personal comfort zone, here are a few of his most oft-expressed square world philosophies which can be found in his writings or on his website:

## Public education should be abolished.
## Public schools are no more than jails.
## Public education is a form of child abuse.
## Nuclear waste should be diluted and sprinkled over the ocean.
## Nuclear waste should be diluted and used in home building.
## Humans are not the root cause of global warming.
## HIV does not cause AIDS and AIDS was a “false crisis.”

There are more – many more – but you get the idea. Continue Reading »

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Aug 13 2013

A hotter frying pan?

Published by under Oregon

oregon
RANDY STAPILUS / Oregon

The tenor of articles in the Oregonian after the Oregon Republican Party’s change in leadership, which was made last weekend, was that the action was “putting an end to a months-long controversy over party leadership.”

That an extent at least, it did that. Suzanne Gallagher’s tenure as chair was much criticized (money management seemed to be a core issue), and she backed away from the job in the face of a recall effort that looked likely to succeed, So there’s that.

But you can’t help thinking that, over the months to come into the tenure of newly-elected Chair Art Robinson, a lot of Republicans will be pining for the good old days.

It’s worth noting here what a party chair, in any state or even on the national level, does and doesn’t do. Often they get too much blame or credit (depending on how the elections go) for whatever the voters do, when in fact they have relatively little to do with it. Party chairs oversee their party’s organization, watch how its money is spent and how people are hired and fired. It’s partly grunt work organizational, keeping the county operations running and the state organization active and at least somewhat visible. The chair is the party’s face to the world. The chair is also expected to help out with fundraising, the unglamorous but essential work of persuading people to fork over.

The skill set you want for a party chair becomes clear when you look at that job description: Someone who’s a good manager, skilled at public relations and smooth, diplomatic, cooperative and persuasive on a personal level. Perhaps above all, you want someone who won’t damage the organization by dividing it or by saying or doing things that damage its image with the voters.

Art Robinson, even his strongest supporters would have to admit if they’re being honest, ain’t that kind of guy.

You could say of him that there’s a certain fearlessness in saying what he thinks, and anyone willing to put themselves out there to run for Congress – as he did, twice – has shown a level of civic commitment.

But this is a guy who has mostly pulled away from society, and probably as a logical reaction to his own nature (and that of other people). He is known as fierce (in a public context), undiplomatic, uncompromising. And he likes to say his piece. If he turns out to be a quiet behind the scenes party mechanic, he would surprise a lot of people. Continue Reading »

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Aug 10 2013

Oregonian: Change your mind

Published by under Oregon,Reading

ridenbaugh Northwest
Reading

Elected officials don’t often give public advice to private businesses on how they should do business. Portland City Council member Steve Novick however, did just that in a recent blog post.

On August 7, the Oregonian had a very nice editorial commending me for changing my mind about something I was planning to do. It occurred to me that the Oregonian itself, and its parent company, Advance Publications, could gain a lot of good will if they changed their minds about some things they are planning to do. So I figured I might as well give them my two cents:

Don’t eliminate seven-day delivery.

Eliminating a seven-day-a-week paper is bad for democracy; as Mayor Hales said, online we look only for the things we know we’re interested in, but when we see a front page, we can wind up reading about something we should care about but never thought about before. Advance (owned by the Newhouse family) is the only national chain that is doing this; are they really sure they’re smarter than everyone else? And the Oregonian is, according to the publisher, making money; they don’t have to do this to survive.

Don’t fire Scott Learn.

Scott covers environmental issues, and does it very well. He tells complicated stories in an accessible way. And he hasn’t always only done environmental stories; I remember a fine piece he did on the inequities in our screwed-up property tax system in, I think, 2005. He’s one of the best reporters the Oregonian has ever had. And a really nice guy, too.

Don’t fire Ryan White.

Ryan is now the music critic, but he’s mostly just a fantastic all-around writer. He created one of the funniest things I’ve ever seen, back in 2008, when he had a sports blog – the Best Thing in the World Competition, an NCAA-tournament style competition to determine, simply, the Best Thing In the World, through fan voting. The competition featured terrific, gripping matchups like Mike Ditka vs. Fire, Keith Jackson vs. The Wheel, and, if I recall correctly. Las Vegas vs. Sliced Bread. How could the guy who came up with that idea be out of a job?
But he’s also a very good music critic. A couple weeks back, I attended a Randy Newman concert, and Newman thanked “Mr. White from the paper” for his article previewing the concert. I’ve never, ever heard an artist do that before. Randy Newman is in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. I don’t think the Oregonian is likely to find another music critic who gets shout-outs from Hall of Famers.

Don’t fire David Sarasohn.

Just as a business decision I think it’s insane; I am quite confident that thousands of Oregonians mostly get the paper to read David Sarasohn. David is a fine, gentle, funny writer. He has (among other things) waged a fierce single-handed battle against childhood hunger in Oregon. And here are just a couple personal memories: He had a piece on Lewis and Clark some years ago, in which he noted how many things in Oregon are named after Lewis and Clark, and said that if weren’t for them we’d have lots of Oregon places and institutions with names like “Fred.” I emailed him and said I thought “Fred” would be a fine place name, and suggested (I hope this doesn’t offend anyone in Gresham) that I don’t see why people in Gresham would object to living in Fred instead. David immediately fired back with a soliloquy on the historical importance of Postmaster General Walter Gresham. Another time, the O had a headline on Amtrak cuts titled “Blood on the Tracks,” So I emailed David saying I’d always hoped the O would have more headlines based on Bob Dylan album titles, and was glad they were finally coming around. He immediately responded, “Don’t you remember our headline on the Barbara Roberts – Norma Paulus budget battle, “Blonde on Blonde”?” I doubt any paper in America has an editorial writer with a more refined sense of culture, history and wit than that.

The Oregonian wrote, “Switching course … can take even more courage than sticking to a controversial position.” So show your courage, Oregonian! Switch your course. A lot of people would be very proud of you.

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Aug 01 2013

Water, farmers and the state

Published by under Oregon,Reading

From an August 1 newsletter by state Representative Doug Whitsett, R-Klamath Falls.

It has become increasingly evident, over the past several years, that the Oregon Water Resources Department is no longer a friend of agriculture.

Perhaps their position was best demonstrated by the lack of support for the Department’s budget. On the day their budget was to be voted on the Senate floor, the only letter of support was from the Oregon Conservation Network. There was no letter of support from any farm, ranch, nursery, groundwater or industrial water users….. NONE!

A companion Department fee bill, HB 2259, was returned to the Senate Rules Committee from the Senate floor because there were not enough votes to pass the bill. The Committee significantly reduced the requested fee increases. Our bipartisan coalition forced that nearly unprecedented action, because we believed the fee increases were absurdly excessive and the purpose of many of the fee increases were counterproductive to Oregon’s economy.

The Oregon Conservation Network is a coalition of more than 40 mostly extreme environmentalist organizations. Some of the Networks stated priorities for the recently concluded legislative session included:

 To promote a tax on each water right in order to support more stringent water regulation.
 To manage Oregon waters to encourage more transfers from agricultural use to in stream flows for the benefit of fish.
 To create a ban on suction dredge gold mining in Oregon.
 And, to expand Oregon Scenic Rivers to include not only rivers but creeks and small tributaries.

Most of the Network’s legislative agenda was either introduced or supported by the Oregon Water Resources Department. The Department actively promoted a mosaic of legislation that, in its entirety, would have significantly changed existing Oregon water law.

Virtually all proposed bills would have either further regulated out of stream water use or enhanced the Department’s ability to authorize transfers of existing irrigation water rights to in stream flows. Several attempts were introduced to provide the Department authority to buy and sell water rights through contracts with little regard for priority dates or potential injury to other water right holders.

The Department’s efforts to increase their revenue included new and increased fees for services, a substantial new fee to change the name on a water right certificate or permit, and a new annual $100 tax on all water rights. They explained that they needed the extra money to help implement their proposed changes.

It appears that the Conservation Network’s primary purpose for supporting the expansion of scenic rivers is to restrict the use of private land and water resources.

Current law provides that all uses of private land within a quarter of a mile of a scenic river are strictly regulated. No new surface water diversions are allowed from any Oregon Scenic River. No new wells for irrigation are allowed, without bucket for bucket mitigation in the event that the groundwater aquifer is considered to be connected to the scenic waterway.

In fact, any existing well may be ruled-off if the well is constructed within a mile of the scenic river or a tributary of the scenic river. The Department has the legal authority to shut down any such well, regardless of the priority date of the well.

With the current drought conditions in Southern Oregon, and the Klamath River adjudication being implemented, you may not have noticed that the Oregon Water Resources Department is already doing these things in the Klamath River Basin. The Department has refused to permit or delayed the permitting of a number of new wells that were constructed in the upper basin during the past four years.
At the same time, the Department was working on a modeled analysis of the regional aquifer in the upper basin. That four year modeling study has recently been completed. To no ones’ great surprise, the Department has concluded, from the model, the aquifer is connected with the scenic Klamath River. Continue Reading »

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Jul 16 2013

Portland building ages

Published by under Oregon

ridenbaugh Northwest
Reading

Here’s a map to ponder over a while: Showing the age of buildings in Portland. There’s actually some correspondence to politics (not all of Portland is equally Democratic).

The map, developed by Justin Palmer, can be found here. As on most political maps, the deeper blue is Democratic, and that seems generally reflective here.

A short article in the Atlantic’s web site also notes, “When making the map, Palmer was pleasantly surprised by a few patterns, such as the way older and more developed neighborhoods tended to follow historical streetcar lines. Then there’s Interstate 205 acting like a wall separating two oceans of different-era structures, which the map’s creator is still scratching his head about.”

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Jun 20 2013

A great newspaper’s lousy spin

Published by under Oregon

stapilus RANDY
STAPILUS

 
The View
from Here

The news of what the Oregonian will be doing, and not doing, by and on October 1, was bad enough. But do they have to insult our intelligence, and do a really bad job of dodging the facts in a hail or corporate bafflegab, at the same time?

Here’s how the Oregonian story on the new developments begins: ” A new, digitally focused media company, Oregonian Media Group, will launch this fall to expand news and information products in Oregon and Southwest Washington. The new company, which will launch October 1, will operate OregonLive.com and publish The Oregonian and its related print products. A separate company, Advance Central Services Oregon, will provide support services for Oregonian Media Group and other companies. Oregonian Media Group will introduce new and improved digital products, including enhancements to Oregon’s largest news website, OregonLive.com. The company will provide up-to-the-minute news and information, when and where readers want it – on their desktops, laptops, smartphones and tablets. At the same time, it will continue to publish Oregon’s oldest, largest and leading newspaper.”

Sounds fine, doesn’t it? Doesn’t sound very significant to the average reader, does it?

Of course, what’s really happening, and what’s not even really hinted at in those opening sentences, is this: The paper is cutting back home delivery from seven to three times a week (there’s a fig leaf about a “Saturday edition,” but evidently it will be delivered with the Sunday paper). There will be layoffs – no specific word on how many, but word circulating is that they will be large. The paper will move out of its long-time building gently uphill from Portland’s downtown, to some smaller digs, no longer needing the space. And so on.

You can find an actual comprehensible news report about what’s happening and what its significance is, at Willamette Week.

What it comes to is this: The Oregonian will no longer be a true daily newspaper (at least not in any sense that distinguishes it from every weekly newspaper that also runs a 24/7 website, as most of them do). It will have a far smaller reporting and editing staff and so – the limitless capacity of the web notwithstanding – there will be less local and regional news coverage. News consumers in Oregon will be taking a major hit.

So, long term, I suspect, will the Oregonian, and its parent Advance Publications, based out of New York; Advance (not in Portland) was where the cutback decisions got made. (They are similar to the approach which gouged the papers in Cleveland and New Orleans, which Advance also owns).

Not long ago I talked with a veteran and successful newspaper publisher outside Oregon curious what I’d heard about what was going on at the Oregonian. I said there was talk about the three-day-a-week model and major cutbacks, but also hearing about blowback in Ohio and Louisiana, with the possibility of some rethinking about at the approach at Advance. He and I agreed the big cut approach would be disastrous, and hoped it would be reconsidered.

But evidently not.

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Jun 19 2013

How not to win them over

Published by under Oregon,Oregon column

oregon

It was an expression of attitude, sure. A clear expression, and one in keeping with many active parts of the base. It was intended to raise money, and it evidently has.

But it showed too the tone-deafness that offers one reason Oregon Republicans aren’t doing better. It’s an automatic Facebook post and direct mail people for anyone not part of the gun advocacy crowd, which in Oregon includes a whole lot of swing voters.

 

gun raffle

 

The Multnomah County Republican Party is holding an auction: “AR-15 Raffle! Get Your Tickets NOW! The MCRP is raffling off a DPMS AR-15 – $10 per ticket or 12 for $100. Maximum tickets sold is 500. This is the PERFECT gift to slip into a father’s day card!”

A KATU-TV news story about it quoted Jeff Reynolds, the county chair, as saying, “It’s been very popular. To be frank, we could not make as much money with a TV as we could with an AR-15.” Significant parts of the base, he suggested, are worried their guns may be taken away.

He’s probaby right about all that.

Some miles to the south in Salem, Republican legislators have been stepping rather more carefully, in general, sticking to their ideas (and, generally, their base) while making the case for their points to others, especially people in the middle. They get some backing from the middle on PERS (the very costly Oregon public employee system), some traction in places on taxes and fees. Their recognizing that control of both chambers, now in Democratic hands, is very nearly on the bubble, and a modest breeze could give them control in 2014. (The Democrats seem, uneasily, to understand that too.)

But while the legislators move with some caution, other local party people seem not to.

Word of the raffle of an AR-15 – the same kind of weapon unleashed to deadly effect by a suicidal gunman at Clackamas Mall last winter – will appall people in Portland and the rest of Multnommah County. Okay, that’s overwhelmingly Democratic to begin with. But it’s not likely to play well either in the swing counties, notably very swingy Clackamas, where Republicans can easily get tagged as the gun nut party.

This wasn’t a brilliant media maneuver by Oregon Democrats. This was a gift to them.

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Jun 01 2013

First take: Sentence changes

Published by under First Take,Oregon

news

SENTENCE CHANGES There’s talk that serious changes in sentencing might not make it through this year’s Oregon legislative session. But when you have the hard-nosed coalition of DAs, who have been most opposing to relaxing the sentencing rules, getting behind some serious compromises, you have to think that something may be coming. Something, along the lines of figuring that the prosecutors wouldn’t be doing this if they didn’t some wall handwriting. Not that it’s all a settled deal. But a useful piece in the Eugene Register Guard does suggest some lines along which a final substantial bill may emerge.

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May 23 2013

Redefining the entity

Published by under Oregon,Stapilus

stapilus RANDY
STAPILUS

 
The View
from Here

Here’s one that sounds like a feel-good deal on the surface, and maybe will never be more than that … but opens the door, just a crAck, to something much larger. As John Lennon exhorted, imagine …

For-profit corporations set up under a legal framework in which they are required to operate not exclusively for the the purpose of enhancing shareholder value, but also with the requirement that recognition of the public interest and fair play with their business partners – customers, vendors, employees and others – also be a required, and demonstrable, part of the mix.

Do that – change the century-old (it isn’t much more than that) requirement that for-profits operate solely for their stockholders’ immediate financial benefit, and you could have a truly significant global game-changer.

The Oregon House Bill 2296a, which cleared the Senate 22-8 (and now goes to Governor John Kitzhaber for likely signature), doesn’t go that far. It’s a lot less ambitious, merely setting up a new kind of business structure:

Currently, legal designations for corporate and business organizations focus the duties of corporate officers on matters of financial stability and success. Businesses that wish to provide a larger community benefit under the current structure must validate these benefits in the context of the financial viability of the organization. Under HB 2296A, a company can add a social or environmental benefit as a key mission of the business in addition to profit.

“By establishing benefit companies, we can attract new businesses to Oregon that focus on serving the greater good while providing a real economic value to owners, employees, and communities,” said Senate Majority Leader Diane Rosenbaum. “Today’s vote is a step towards making Oregon a true leader in a new economy that encourages more businesses to pursue more than just profit.”

HB 2296A allows companies of varying size to adopt the benefit company designation, and requires these companies to compile an annual report about the social or environmental benefits provided by the organization.

It’s a small step. But who knows where it might lead?

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Pike Place's plans for a new waterfront entrance.

 

THE OREGON POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

The Field Guide is the reference for the year on Oregon politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Compiled by a long-time Northwest political writer and a Salem Statesman-Journal political reporter.
OREGON POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Hannah Hoffman; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
THE IDAHO POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase is the reference for the year on Idaho Politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Written by two of Idaho's most veteran politcal observers.
IDAHO POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
NEW EDITIONS is the story of the Northwest's 226 general-circulation newspapers and how they're dealing with the day of the Internet. New Editions tells you where your newspaper is headed.
New Editions: The Northwest's Newspapers as They Were, Are and Will Be. Steve Bagwell and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 324 pages. Softcover. (e-book ahead). $16.95.
See the NEW EDITIONS page.

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without compromise
WITHOUT COMPROMISE is the story of the Idaho State Police, from barely-functioning motor vehicles and hardly-there roads to computer and biotechnology. Kelly Kast has spent years researching the history and interviewing scores of current and former state police, and has emerged with a detailed and engrossing story of Idaho.
WITHOUT COMPROMISE page.

 

Diamondfield
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The Old West saw few murder trials more spectacular or misunderstood than of "Diamondfield" Jack Davis. After years of brushes with the noose, Davis was pardoned - though many continued to believe him guilty. Max Black has spent years researching the Diamondfield saga and found startling new evidence never before uncovered - including the weapon and one of the bullets involved in the crime, and important documents - and now sets out the definitive story. Here too is Black's story - how he found key elements, presumed lost forever, of a fabulous Old West story.
See the DIAMONDFIELD page for more.
 

Medimont Reflections Chris Carlson's Medimont Reflections is a followup on his biography of former Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus. This one expands the view, bringing in Carlson's take on Idaho politics, the Northwest energy planning council, environmental issues and much more. The Idaho Statesman: "a pull-back-the-curtain account of his 40 years as a player in public life in Idaho." Available here: $15.95 plus shipping.
See the Medimont Reflections page  
 
Idaho 100 NOW IN KINDLE
 
Idaho 100, about the 100 most influential people ever in Idaho, by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson is now available. This is the book about to become the talk of the state - who really made Idaho the way it is? NOW AN E-BOOK AVAILABLE THROUGH KINDLE for just $2.99. Or, only $15.95 plus shipping.
 

Idaho 100 by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson. Order the Kindle at Amazon.com. For the print edition, order here or at Amazon.


 

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    watergates

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    More about this book by Randy Stapilus

    Water rights and water wars: They’re not just a western movie any more. The Water Gates reviews water supplies, uses and rights to use water in all 50 states.242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

    intermediary

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    More about this book by Lin Tull Cannell

    At a time when Americans were only exploring what are now western states, William Craig tried to broker peace between native Nez Perces and newcomers from the East. 15 years in the making, this is one of the most dramatic stories of early Northwest history. 242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

    Upstream

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    The Snake River Basin Adjudication is one of the largest water adjudications the United States has ever seen, and it may be the most successful. Here's how it happened, from the pages of the SRBA Digest, for 16 years the independent source.

    Paradox Politics

    ORDER HERE or Amazon.com

    After 21 years, a 2nd edition. If you're interested in Idaho politics and never read the original, now's the time. If you've read the original, here's view from now.


    Governing Idaho:
    Politics, People and Power

    by James Weatherby
    and Randy Stapilus
    Caxton Press
    order here

    Outlaw Tales
    of Idaho

    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
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    It Happened in Idaho
    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here

    Camping Idaho
    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here