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Posts published in “Idaho”

Idaho SoS: large

There is a certain temptation to read a long-range mindset into this evening's Idaho State of the State, Governor Dirk Kempthorne's last. It starts with one fairly well established bit of information, that Kempthorne wanted to be governor of Idaho a long time before he reached that office. And it goes on like this.

Dirk KempthorneThat Kempthorne wanted the job not just for the title and ceremony of it but because he had ambitions, big ambitions, ways he'd like to see the state progress, and ways, he doubtless thought, a governor could push through. He had the idea of becoming one of those governors who were much more than mere caretakers or tinkerers. He wanted to make a difference.

All of that is speculative, may or may not be true. But it would make sense of the arc of the Kempthorne governorship, which would lend some poignant drama to the three months that lie ahead. (more…)

Adamson: Picking the lock?

Was 22 years ago that Dan Adamson last crossed Idaho's public path, taking a flyer on beating a hard-to-beat politician, and came close to being elected to Congress.

Now he's hoping history sorta repeats, with a little added burp. (more…)

Otter’s recantation

Dare we call it a flip-flop? That might be a cheap shot - and beside the point. The question at the heart of it is this: What is the reason Representative C.L. "Butch" Otter abruptly has this to say today about his till-now firm support for the bill calling for mass sellout of federal lands to pay Hurricane Katrina costs:

“I was wrong. It wasn’t the first time, and it won’t be the last.” And his sponsorship is withdrawn ... "for now."

Part of what Otter is best known for in Idaho is his philosophical stance - clarity, rigidity, thinness, relative purity, define it as you will. He long has been a small-l libertarian, a "limited government" guy, which makes sense of his stand on the Patriot Act and also his stand on the lands legislation; ask him - go ahead - if he thinks there should be more or fewer public lands in Idaho. He has had personal clashes with the feds over land use and environmental laws.

So his backing of the Katrina legislation should come as no shock; it's of a piece.

The criticism of it is no shock, either. Most Idahoans like to grumble about the Forest Service or the BLM, but many of them also enjoy being able to use the public lands - in alternative to being fenced out. That point may be getting ever more pertinent as parts of Idaho are getting ever more crowded.

There are no newly-apparent facts on the table about all this. So when Otter says "I was wrong," what exactly does that mean? What was it precisely that he was wrong about? The legislation specifically? (If so, what did he suddenly come to realize about its flaws?) The way he has thought about public lands, and how they should be treated? Has he had a philosophical reawakening? Did he get scared about a loss of votes and decide to pander? What changed?

That's an important question, because without knowing the answer, we have no way of knowing whether his pullback of sponsorship - "for now" - means, "until the uproar in Idaho dies down," or or whether it is predicated on something else. And without knowing the answer, we have a chasm in our evolving understanding of who Butch Otter is.

Politically, Otter's mea culpa clearly was meant to put the cork in the conversation. What it should do now is uncork that conversation.

Immigration ahead

The direction of the immigration issue is one of the puzzlements of politics 2006 - potentially important, but hard to chart a path to the front burner.

We were discussing the '06 race for the 1st district Idaho House seat, and reflecting on that. One of the sorps of candidates in that race, Robert Vasquez (see the list of 25 influential Idahoans) has made immigration his issue cornerstone. If it flares into a truly big deal, in the minds of voters, around primary election day, then his chances expand; if not, his chances look smaller. Other candidates too, looking for a rocket toride, could seize on this one.

So the new Washington Post-ABC News poll on the subject may be of interest.

A Washington Post-ABC News poll taken in mid-December found Americans alarmed by the federal government's failure to do more to block the flow of illegal immigration and critical of the impact of illegal immigration on the country. But it also found them receptive to the aspirations of illegal immigrants living and working in the United States. ...

Immigration still ranks below the war in Iraq, terrorism, health care and the economy on the public's list of priorities. But in many parts of the country — not just those areas near the U.S.-Mexico border — it has become an issue of pressing significance because of its economic, social and, more recently, national-security implications.

Keep watching.

The 2005 NW Influencers

Ridenbaugh Press has been publishing lists of influential people for close to a decade now, and our latest list - three lsts of 25 influencers of change in their states - are now available here.

Be sure to note, though, how we use the term "influence" for purposes of these lists. That may help save you some puzzlement as you come across the names of people whose impact may be a little subtle.

And be sure to make your way back here, and leave all the comments you like. (Trust me - if you're interested in the Northwest at all, you'll have comments.)

Irony in action

File this under the category of "highly unlikely to happen," but it seemed worthy of regonial note.

From a San Francisco Chronicle piece on a press for renaming the national FBI center after someone other than J. Edgar Hoover, in part because of his role in surveilling Martin Luther King ...

Rep. Cynthia McKinney, D-Ga., who is working for release of King's intelligence files, has introduced legislation to name the FBI building for Frank Church, the late Idaho senator whose Senate Select Committee on Intelligence held scorching hearings on U.S. intelligence gathering and FBI abuses under Hoover.

A closing blast

And so 2005 comes to a close ... with a lot of rain.

rain on an Oregon highwayMetaphors aside, that's a good thing, however tired some of us may be getting at the steady rainfall and periodic light flooding. The flooding, we can at least console ourselves, hasn't done much damage or overflowed many critical waterways. And as for the rainfall ... well, we just need to take care as we go out to celebrate tonight.

And there is something in this to celebrate.

According to the national snowpack recordkeepers, the region is more or less on track for a good, solid snowpack this year, something we haven't been able to say for quite a few seasons. (more…)

Rererereapportionment

Some people are never satisfied. That's actually one of the realities of legislative reapportionment: No matter how you reshape and rearrange, you can't please everyone. That doesn't give the displeased grounds for a lawsuit.

Idaho legislative districtsOur view on the current districting map for Idaho has been that it's not ideal but not bad either - allowing for some problematic areas. One of those is a district connecting a small group of people near Idaho Falls with a population base located around 80 miles away near the Utah border, with no useful direct road contact between (unless you want to rev up your four wheel drive, you have to veer outside the state or district to get from one to the other). It's an unfortunate district, no doubt. There's another running from Homedale to Twin Falls almost as bad. Such things happen to someone in every reapportionment.

But a number of eastern Idahoans, some of them legislators or former legislators, are aggrieved, and they have taken the reapportionment back to the Idaho Supreme Court. It has been there before, during the original reapportionment process in 2002. Further challenges led to more intense inquiry but, in the Idaho Supreme Court decision released Wednesday, the result was much the same. (more…)

Acquisition

The formal description reads: "F&M Holding Company, the parent company of Farmers & Merchants State Bank, is the largest independent bank holding company headquartered in Boise, Idaho. Farmers and Merchants State Bank, is a community banking organization established in 1967. FMSB's business mix is both retail and commercial, with a strategic focus on business banking. Farmers & Merchants State Bank also offers trust, investments and private banking services. The Company, with $582 million in assets, has 11 full-service branches located throughout the Boise and Treasure valley area."

Make that, "was the largest independent bank holding company headquartered in Boise, Idaho."

Cascade Bancorp, which is based in Bend an runs the rapidly-growing Bank of the Cascades, just bought it - greatly extending its reach to the east, and making it a much larger regional player in banking. To date, Cascade has 21 branches, all in Oregon, most in central Oregon.

It now seems positioned for a larger regional growth. Speculation: Watch for entry into Washington state before long.

Suburban centers

Call it a demographic trend, this one led, slightly, by Idaho.

For a long time Idaho, Washington and Oregon have had some population characteristics in common: a large central city (Boise, Seattle, Portland) with the pair of next largest cities spread out a little bit (Pocatello and Idaho Falls; Tacoma and Spokane; Eugene and Salem) and closely matched in population and sometimes exchanging ranking, well below the level of the lead city. These patterns have held for decades.

We're now seeing some adjustment - new trends. (more…)