Writings and observations

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Meridian-Eagle corridor still filling in (Boise Statesman)
More Idahoans facing climate change (IF Post Register)
Geological tour center opens at Driggs (IF Post Register)
Big wildfire roars south of Lewiston (Lewiston Tribune)
Large scale changes planned at airport (Moscow News)
Canyon work release still active for now (Nampa Press Tribune)
Sudden flood hits Twin Falls (TF Times News)
TF finds West Nile in mosquitoes (TF Times News)

UO president quits after two years (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal)
Fire in Columbian gorge ousts residents (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard)
Early water shutoffs in Klamath Project (KF Herald & News)
Still more lightning wildfires (KF Herald & News)
State water supply fund still needs board (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Day care group blocks pot use (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bainbridge Island dog park opens (Bremerton Sun)
Area faces vias backlog (Kennewick Herald)
More wildfires in Okanogan area (Longview News)
Tea Party loses ground in Cowlitz precincts (Longview News)
Seattle house prices hit record levels (Seattle times)
Celis poor showing in 1st stuns GOP (Seattle Times)
Fife argues state can’t legalize pot (Tacoma News Tribune)
Retail pot store in rural Pierce planned (Tacoma News Tribune)
Columbia gorge fire ousts residents (Vancouver Columbian)
Benton complaint against Inslee dismissed (Vancouver Columbian)
Snag Canyon fire finds wind (Yakima Herald Republic)

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news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

SUPI candidate Ybarra no show at school event (Boise Statesman)
New plans for Boise downtown bike lanes (Boise Statesman)
Improvements in housing markets in IF (IF Post Register)
E Washington elections results (Lewiston Tribune, Moscow News)
Genesee grass fire threatens home (Moscow News)
Caldwell’s old Kings building to be razed (Nampa Press Tribune)
Rule Steel hit with OSHA ruling (Nampa Press Tribune)
Flooding hits parts of southern Idaho (Pocatello Journal)
Idaho issued reply in same sex marriage case (TF Times News)
Wildfire funding changes blocked (TF Times News)

Interim management director at Eugene schools (Eugene Register Guard)
Festival of Eugene gets site, needs more (Eugene Register Guard)
Water allocations at Klamath constrict (KF Herald & News)
Rain helping with wildfire battle (KF Herald & News)
Partial containment at Oregon gulch fire (Medford Tribune, Ashland Tidings)
Virus killing southern Oregon deer (Medford Tribune, Ashland Tidings)
Old hospital building demolished (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Forest plan blasted by local officials (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Housing scarce in Pendleton, Hermiston (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Tightened rules on pot, daycare providers (Salem Statesman Journal)

Election results (Seattle Times, Spokane Spokesman, Tacoma News Tribune, Everett Herald, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Kennewick Herald, Olympian, Bremerton Sun, Longview News)
Planning for new Paine Field projects (Everett Herald)
Franklin Co jail hit with abuse lawsuit (Kennewick Herald)
Federal official won’t inspect grain at Vancouver (Vancouver Columbian)
Snag Canyon fire develops (Yakima Herald Republic)

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First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

AG approves St Lukes takeover of Elks Rehab (Boise Statesman)
Ada County, Caldwell adopt police video (Boise Statesman)
Idaho Co: Nez Perce tribe owes $300K garbage bill (Lewiston Tribune)
Lewiston considering human rights ordinance (Lewiston Tribune)
Army Corps will review pollution at dams (Lewiston Tribune)
City pay raise in Pullman (Moscow News)
McMorris ahead in campaign funds (Moscow News)
Crime down a bit in Moscow (Nampa Press Tribune)
Caldwell chooses dog park location (Nampa Press Tribune)
West Nile mosquitoes on rise again in area (Nampa Press Tribune)
Rains eases fires in southern Idaho (TF Times News)
More whooping cough cases (TF Times News)
Twin Falls annexes land for elementary school (TF Times News)

Wildfire smoke hits lower Willamette (Eugene Register Guard)
Festival of Eugene still trying to organize (Eugene Register Guard)
Wildfires roaring across southern Oregon (KF Herald & News)
Salmon may get more water if die-off happens (KF Herald & News)
Phosphoric acid found on rail car (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Kitzhaber, Hayes note engagement (Salem Statesman Journal)
Ancestry.com accesses state history database (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gun club gets rejection in Kitsap (Bremerton Sun)
Ellensburg fire still roaring (Yakima Herald Republic, Kennewick Herald)
Army Corps will disclose pollution from dams (Spokane Spokesman, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Kennewick Herald, Longview News)
Lake Crescent wildfire stopped (Port Angeles News)
Seattle cops inadvertently turn on cell tracker (Seattle Times)
Voting deadline is here (Spokane Spokesman)
Benton blasts Inslee on Vancouver port (Vancouver Columbian)
Vancouver considers year-round fireworks (Vancouver Columbian)
WA Supreme Court sends fish/game cases to prosecutors (Yakima Herald Republic)

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First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Idaho paying more, not less, at gas pumps (Boise Statesman)
One hurting, CradlePoint growing fast again (Boise Statesman)
Appeals court reviewing Idaho law on marriage (Moscow News)
Fewer building permits at Caldwell (Nampa Press Tribune)
No winemaker school facilities in Idaho (Nampa Press Tribune)
Restoration plans for Twin’s Orpheum theatre (TF Times News)

UO profs working on sustainable city (Eugene Register Guard)
Ashland pot rules ready for Tuesday vote (Ashland Tidings)
Ashland water situation helped by conservation (Ashland Tidings)
Oregon Gulch, other fires grow fast (Medford Tribune)
Border children arriving in Idao (Portland Oregonian)
A look at donors to area races (Salem Statesman Journal)

Sheldon Senate race gets help from GOP (Bremerton Sun)
Republicans look to replace Mike Hope (Everett Herald)
STEM elementary school ready at Pasco (Kennewick Herald)
95 of 123 legislative races have only 2 contenders (Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Longview News)
Clallam prosecutor candidates on race (Port Angeles News)
Seattle bans right turn at Dexter/Mercer (Seattle Times)
Vancouver considerd parking meter app (Vancouver Columbian)
Fires still burning hot near Ellensburg (Yakima Herald Republic)

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First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Idaho Republicans elect Yates as chair (Boise Statesman, IF Post Register, TF Times News, Pocatello Journal)
West Ada School District still growing (Boise Statesman)
Idahoans, some of them, confront climte change (Boise Statesman, Lewiston Tribune)
Barley demand growing (IF Post Register)
Evaluating cost of high school sports (Lewiston Tribune)
SkyFest becomes major event at Pocatello (Pocatello Journal)
Martaugh, Hanen school districts may merge (TF Times News)

Irrigators, others struggle with water at KF (KF Herald & News)
Wildfire smoke spreads widely (KF Herald & News)
Beaver Complex fire could lead to big losses (Medford Tribune)
‘Dark money’ from Koch group heads to OR race (Portland Oregonian)
Do weatherization subsidies pay off? (Portland Oregonian)

Harrison Medical’s president departs (Bremerton Sun)
The last voyage of the USS Constellation (Bremerton Sun)
Primary election turnout low so far (Everett Herald, Vancouver Columbian)
Another Methow Valley fire roars (Vancouver Columbian, Kennewick Herald)
Red Mountain wine plans major expansion (Kennewick Herald)
Trying for cleanup at Mt Solo landfill (Longview News)
Forks seeing series of mills close (Port Angeles News)
Clallam prosecutor candidates go at it (Port Angeles News)
Seattle home prices through the roof (Seattle Times)
Transport problems for pot growers on islands (Seattle Times)
Illegal fireworks users ticketed (Vancouver Columbian)

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First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Female Episcopal priest dies (Boise Statesman)
Upgrades continue for Moscow-Pullman airport (Moscow News)
Latah deputies may see some pay increase (Moscow News)
Lots of exemptions in covered load rules (Nampa Press Tribune)
Changing rules for undocumented students (Nampa Press Tribune)
Pocatello housing group gets funding (Pocatello Journal)
New proposed rules for oil, gas (TF Times News)
Labrador blames Obama on immigrant children (TF Times News)

Concerns over plans for homeless camp (Eugene Register Guard)
Sky Lakes Medical Center spending on equipment (KF Herald & News)
Big burn in Oregon Gulch fire (Medford Tribune, Ashland Tidings)
Pendleton crime lab sees budget trouble (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Analyzing populations of Hermiston, Pendleton (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Moda premiums will rise 10.6% (Portland Oregonian)
Looking at Providence Park finances (Portland Oregonian)
Intense lighting storms in mid-Willamette (Salem Statesman Journal)

Reviewing Kitsap assessor race (Kitsap Sun)
Edmonds gets new low-income medical clinic (Everett Herald)
Former Herald building sold for low price (Everett Herald)
Legal issues addressed on immigrant children (Olympian)
Inslee visits as fires erupt (Spokane Spokesman)
Tacoma pot sales start (Tacoma News Tribune)

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First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Republicans plan for Saturday meeting (Boise Statesman, IF Post Register)
Vehicles in intersections at red lights (Boise Statesman)
Intense hail storm damages crops in north (Lewiston Tribune)
Latah County finances look ok (Moscow News)
Idaho school officials look at dual credit (Moscow News)
Wildfires continue to heat up (Nampa Press Tribune)
Canyon debates over suspending labor detail (Nampa Press Tribune)
SkyFest event planned for Pocatello airport (TF Times News)

500 years for sex molester, a record (Eugene Register Guard)
Klamath concerns about groundwater limits (KF Herald & News)
Ashland area evacuated over wildfires (Medford Tribune, KF Herald & News, Ashland Tidings)
Medford police station design approved (Medford Tribune)
Grass fire hitting Condon area (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Discussion about volume at Columbian spillways (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Tension with neighbors of a pot farm (Portland Oregonian)
Providence mapping tumors in cancer war (Portland Oregonian)

Planning for improvements at Bainbridge terminal (Bremerton Sun)
Bremerton cops focus on repeat offenders (Bremerton Sun)
House candidate refunds donations after complaints (Olympian)
Interfor may close two timber mills (Port Angeles News)
Spokane council okays more police funds (Spokane Spokesman)
State health covers transgender next year (Tacoma News Tribune)
Clark County accounts criticized in audit (Vancouver Columbian)

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First Take

malloy CHUCK
MALLOY

 
In Idaho

“WHAT? Dan Popkey is going to work for Raul Labrador?”

That was the typical reaction when Popkey, the face of the Idaho Statesman, announced that he was leaving to accept the position as Labrador’s press secretary. Popkey, the most talented political writer in the state, will now be in charge of defending Labrador’s tea party positions and organizing photo-ops with the likes of Rand Paul and Ted Cruz.

The move seems strange, given the fact that Labrador seemingly has gone through more press secretaries than toilet paper in his four years in office. But I can understand Popkey’s thinking. At 55, he was stuck in a high-stress job that was going nowhere.

I’ve seen him tied up in knots, and that’s hell on a person’s blood pressure over time. I’ve seen him at meaningless governor’s photo-op ceremonies, just so he could ask Otter one question without going through the spin doctors. He’s working in an environment that it common to so many newspapers, where layoffs and unpaid furloughs are a way of life. Just about everybody who works for a newspaper these days – any newspaper – is being asked to do more with fewer resources, and Popkey was no exception.

With Labrador, Popkey can work at a more manageable pace and have a better sense of job security. There’s always a chance that Labrador will run for the Senate, or governor’s office, but my guess is he won’t go for those unless he’s sure he can win. In the meantime, Labrador has a safe seat and the national media loves him. He could stay in Congress for as long as Popkey wants to work.

“It’s bittersweet to leave journalism, my first love, but I’m thrilled with the opportunity to apply what I’ve learned to help advance our state’s priorities in Washington,” Popkey said in a statement.

Actually, it won’t work that way at all. Popkey’s job – in fact, his only job – is to serve a congressman who has a strong will, even stronger convictions and an ego the size of Texas. This is no criticism of Labrador. From the beginning, he has known where he is going and how to get there.

Popkey will become a “real” press secretary the first time he has to write a news release, or commentary, that defends a position contrary to Popkey’s personal views. In this case, it could be a monthly occurrence.

The hiring of Popkey provides some adjustments for Labrador. Listening to advice is not one of Labrador’s strong points, but in this case it will pay for him to listen to somebody who has been around as long as Popkey.

But Popkey’s success will not be determined by how much Labrador accepts advice. It will be how he helps improves accessibility with the media. Labrador is treated like a king with the national media, but often is trashed by the Idaho media – and not just the editorial writers. Reporters can attest that getting interview time with Labrador is next to impossible.

Labrador and Popkey would do well to follow the lead of former Indiana Congressman Lee Hamilton, a former longtime chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee. When I was covering Hamilton with the small-town New Albany Tribune (across the bridge from Louisville), he was swamped with interview requests from the national media. But as I was told that my interview requests managed to find their way to the top of the pile.

Labrador will continue to get national media coverage, but he needs to remember who elected him. And he would do well never to let a negative editorial pass without comment. There are always at least two sides to political debates and Labrador-Popkey should not allow themselves to be defined by liberal editorial writers and moderate-leaning editorial boards.

If Popkey thinks he’s the guy who could tame Labrador’s inflated ego, then he’s sadly mistaken. But if Labrador listens, he could end up being a more open and better congressman with Popkey at his side.

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First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Rapid decline among aspen trees (IF Post Register)
IF council, mayor at odds over budget (IF Post Register)
Port of Lewiston not expecting coal shipments (Lewiston Tribune)
Corrections dials down complaints with CCA (Lewiston Tribune)
Canyon Co animal shelter policies questioned (Nampa Press Tribune)
Canyon jail labor detail work halted (Nampa Press Tribune)
Dick’s sporting goods coming to Twin Falls (TF Times News)
Considering wolf control on conservation lands (TF Times News)

Whole Foods finally comes to Eugene (Eugene Register Guard)
Visions develop for EWEB riverside site (Eugene Register Guard)
Debating how much money legal pot could make (KF Herald & News)
New wildfires erupt (Medford Tribune)
Improving picture at PERS balance sheet (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Smart speed limit signs on urban freeway (Portland Oregonian)
Criminal defense lawyers for former Cover Oregon (Portland Oregonian)

Ferry breakdown still unexplained (Bremerton Sun)
Manchester project may still be blocked (Bremerton Sun)
Corporate ownership of Kitsap Sun changes (Bremerton Sun)
Courthouse planning group changes (Everett Herald)
Hot summer has helps area crops (Kennewick Herald)
DOE plan hoped to help groundwater contamination (Kennewick Herald)
Backers of PUD recall have to pay legal costs (Longview News)
Boeing will build Dreamline in South Carolina (Longview News)
Seattle VA wait times were manipulated (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Pam Roach in hot primary contest (Seattle Times)
Tacoma pot store to open this week (Tacoma News Tribune)

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First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Court says Peterson’s out, party will meet (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune, Pocatello Journal)
Boise business BookLamp bought by Apple (Boise Statesman)
Reduced number of sex crimes reported in Idaho (IF Post Register)
Lewiston port gets fiber optic line (Lewiton Tribune)
Nampa building ramps up, almost doubling 2013 (Nampa Press Tribune)
Big growth at Greenleaf Friends Academy (Nampa Press Tribune)
Blackfoot mayor mulls covering expenses (Pocatello Journal)
Court backs Blaine in records denial to CNN (TF Times News)
State land managers seeking policy input (TF Times News)

Eye testing now required in Oregon schools (Eugene Register Guard)
Salmon hit by drought conditions (KF Herald & News)
Muslin charity pleads guilty on tax charges (Ashland Tidings)
Medford Tribune, Ashland Tidings launch new web site (Medford Tribune, Ashland Tidings)
Two Medford council veterans depart (Medford Tribune)
Hermiston charter may revise office terms (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Delegation seeks funds for Columbian cleanup (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Review of east Portland’s political weakness (Portland Oregonian)

Kitsap prosecutor race draws varying support (Bremerton Sun)
Some logging planned in central Kitsap park (Bremerton Sun)
Park and ride planned for Mukilteo (Everett Herald)
Cowlitz, Wahkiakum end pot business bans (Longview News)
New park developing in western Olympia (Olympian)
First pot business approved for Olympia (Olympian)
Olypnia Natl Park chalet moved away from river (Port Angeles News)
Windfall in Sequim sewage fund (Port Angeles News)
Amgen, Puget’s largest biotech firm, to close (Seattle Times)
Top Seattle health leader quits (Seattle Times)
Tacoma citizen group okays Amtrak plan (Tacoma News Tribune)
Pierce Council writes ‘In God We Trust’ on wall (Tacoma News Tribune)
Clark Co voters will vote on bridge in November (Vancouver Columbian)
Legislator home burglary points up phone law need (Vancouver Columbian)

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First Take