Press "Enter" to skip to content

Posts published in “First Take”

On the front pages

news

The Oregon battle over GMO labeling is definitely on the tube, and news reports around the state took notice of that today. The ads are capably produced on both sides, and the results could be pretty close.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Boise considers downtown traffic patterns (Boise Statesman)
Idaho closes out moderate fire season (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
Reviewing Idaho potato market (TF Times News)

GMO initiative battle goes on air (Eugene Register Guard, Medford Tribune, Corvallis Gazette)
New water lines developed in Butte Falls (Medford Tribune)
New hires at UO education school (Eugene Register Guard)
On the new University of Portland president (Portland Oregonian)
Report finds no abuse at state hospital (Salem Statesman Journal)

Inslee panel would revive water, excise taxes (Everett Herald)
Stanfield looks at city hall update (Everett Herald)
Gorge plans and area residents conflict (Yakima Herald Republic, Kennewick Herald)
Gun ballot issue battle over 'transfer' (Olympian)
Issue: Constitutionality of new school taxes (Olympian)
Sequim may see new water rates (Port Angeles News)
Rare bumblebees expand in Olympic park (Port Angeles News)
Judge candidates battle on pay-or-appear (Port Angeles News)
Demand increases for Washington's hops (Seattle Times)
Spokane sheriff positioned for re-election (Spokane Spokesman)
GOP relectant on new school taxes (Tacoma News Tribune)
Bull trout at Yakima deemed endangered (Yakima Herald Republic)

On the front pages

news

The most striking story of the day (in the Medford Mail Tribune - it had run a little earlier in Portland) may have been about law enforcement in Josephine County, where volunteers (with some training by the county) are being sent out to evaluate crime scenes. The somewhat snarky headline referred to "CSI: Josephine County," but it was deserved: Amateurs will be gathering fingerprints and fibers, and law enforcement will be praying it holds up in court. Good luck with that. This isn't law enforcement's preference, to be clear about it. This is a result of voters repeatedly turning down law enforcement levies needed to fund Josephine County enforcement at a level somewhat comparable to other counties. You can expect to see more explosive headlines coming from those quarters sooner or later.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

More Idaho students defaulting on loans (Boise Statesman, Lewiston Tribune)
Yellowstone may want more bucks from visitors (Boise Statesman, IF Post Register)
Profiling race for secretary of state (Boise Statesman)
Offenses behind Canyon Co jail inmates (Nampa Press Tribune)
Idaho Center grapples with finances (Nampa Press Tribune)
Reviewing marketing of Idaho potatoes (Lewiston Tribune)
Meals on Wheels money stalls (TF Times News)

Eugene cops using more body cameras (Eugene Register Guard)
Looking at sage grouse options (KF Herald & News)
Students struggle with loan repayment (Portland Oregonian)
New homeless program seeks student homelss (Medford Tribune)
Josephine Co sends volunteers to crime scenes (Medford Tribune)
Minor party gov candidates join in debates (Salem Statesman Journal)
Reviewing forest service photo policy (Salem Statesman Journal)

Measuring the amount of stream flow (Bremerton Sun)
Hospitals pull funds from Medicaid expansion (Vancouver Columbian, Bremerton Sun)
Woman's death in jail raising questions (Everett Herald)
New Lower Columbia College building get praise (Longview News)
Kaiser medical clinic opens to non-members (Longview News)
Dealing with Olympia's downtown homeless (Olympian)
Olympic narc unit hit with $20m lawsuit (Port Angeles News)
Concerns about Navy electromagnetic project (Port Angeles News)
Rents skyrocketing Seattle (Seattle Times)
Spokane overview - parks issue (Spokane Spokesman)
Latinos see political issue in names (Spokane Spokesman)
Developing Tacoma's Amtrak station (Tacoma News Tribune)
Initiative on guns, and the word 'transfer' (Tacoma News Tribune)
Police increasingly wearing cameras (Tacoma News Tribune)
Yakima works on wastewater flow (Yakima Herald Republic)

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Kathryn Yost, legislative staffer, dies (Idaho Statesman)
IF okays Hitt Road plan; Ammon next (IF Post Register)
Caldwell firefighters see pay raise (Nampa Press Tribune)
Vigils for Idaho pastor held in Iran (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
Reviewing Mitchell Senate campaign (TF Times News)

Fires not quite gone from Oregon (Corvallis Gazette)
More mandatory drug tests for athletes (Eugene Register Guard)
Lane County may try new vehicle fees (Eugene Register Guard)
First televised governor's debate at Sunriver (Eugene Register Guard, KF Herald & News)
KF police chief plans retirement (KF Herald & News)
State Senate 4 race turns negative (Medford Tribune)
Britt Classical Festival draws strong numbers (Medford Tribune)
Reviewing CCO in Umatilla Co (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Walden forests bill passes House again (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Plan for new Irrigon library stalled (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Reviewing race in 5th CD (Portland Oregonian)
Oregon fishermen pulling in PCBs (Portland Oregonian)
PERS costs for schools will drop (Salem Statesman Journal)
ODOT placing median barriers (Salem Statesman Journal)

Concern about mudslide in East Bremerton (Bremerton Sun)
Snohomish medical examiner quits (Everett Herald)
Major power line vandalized (Everett Herald)
Many south sound school enrollments increase (Olympian)
Tacoma schools concerned about new charters (Tacoma News Tribune)
Oil transporters opposing further regs (Vancouver Columbian)

On the front pages

news

Was it a backing off or a miscommunication? The forest service chief says there was never an intent to require permits of news or recreational photographers shooting pictures in the wilderness, that the permits were aimed more at large movie productions and the like. Which doesn't square with local rangers requiring permits of news photographers. The followup news stories were continuing on today; still more followup will be needed.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Nampa-Caldwell I-84 work cancelled (Boise Statesman)
INL projects helps with disaster preparedness (IF Post Register)
New strategic plan on Idaho juvenile justice (IF Post Register)
Otter visits UI, talks college savings (Moscow News)
WA state auditor reviews Whitman issues (Moscow News)
Forest Service says photo plan misunderstood (Lewiston Tribune)
Jones/Ybarra debate at Caldwell (Nampa Press Tribune)
Democrats seeking out younger voters (TF Times News)
More steps toward canyon jump attempt (TF Times News)

New OSU students arrive (Corvallis Gazette)
Tracktown USA pursues global event (Eugene Register Guard)
Wilderness photo permits debated (Portland Oregonian, Salem Statesman Journal, KF Herald & News)
Interior Secretary Jewell visits on grouse (KF Herald & News)
Richardson fined over campaign reporting (Medford Tribune)
Many responses to survey on Ashland ski area (Medford Tribune)
Grant law enforcement looks for truants (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Reviewing 3rd House district race (Portland Oregonian)

Bremerton naval hospital redefing itself (Bremerton Sun)
Delayed Mariott hotel building launched (Everett Herald)
More beds designated for mental health (Everett Herald)
Many retirements in Olympia police this year (Olympian)
Wilderness photo permits debated (Seattle Times, Olympian)
Navy war games planned on Olympic peniunsula (Port Angeles News)
Couple on air for 118 years signs off (Port Angeles News)
Less uncompensated care at Harborview hospital (Seattle Times)
Secret meetings by port panel (Tacoma News Tribune)
New trail maps Tacoma rail tradition (Tacoma News Tribune)
Reviewing 3rd CD contest (Vancouver Columbian)
Oil industry reviewing train testing plans (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima residents may face power rate increase (Yakima Herald Republic)

On the front pages

news

On the list of clearly and obviously idiotic governmental regulations, the planned (actually, long-standing interim rule which may be made permanent) rule on wilderness photography must have a place of honor. Regulation of activity in wilderness areas start from a rational premise, that man should visit but not stay and that his footprint should be as light as possible. And you can see the argument if someone (news organizations included) want to bring in equipment larger than a photographer can carry on his person. Short of that, how does the photo rule (as reported on by a string of Northwest papers today), which may require $1,500 permits even of ordinary visitors to the lands and allows government employees to decide which news stories merit wilderness photography and which don't, serve to protect the condition of wilderness areas? It could undermine them instead if it infuriates people about the idea of designating lands as wilderness (hello, Boulder-White Clouds).

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Forest Service plans wilderness photo rules (Boise Statesman, Lewiston Tribune)
Judge Lodge takes senior status (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
First gubernatorial date held, minus otter (IF Post Register, TF Times News)
Capital for a day meets Lenore (Lewiston Tribune)
Pedestrian mall maybe for downtown Lewiston (Lewiston Tribune)
Questions arising about Lochsa land deal (Moscow News)
C of I adds to faculty, for more students (Nampa Press Tribune)
Clothes store wants to build at canyon rim (TF Times News)

New connector trail west of Corvallis set (Corvallis Gazette)
Family working on pot dispensary business (Corvallis Gazette)
Demolition of old city hall approved (Eugene Register Guard)
Klamath county working on air quality (KF Herald & News)
Gold Hill may set 25% pot tax (Medford Tribune)
Forest Service plans wilderness photo rules (Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Tribune)
Pendleton library considers new services (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Potatoes have above average season (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Stanfield may get low-income housing (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Reviewing 2nd District U.S. House race (Portland Oregonian)
Fires break records in 2014 in Oregon (Portland Oregonian)

Harrison medical sets plans for Silverdale (Bremerton Sun)
Ferries gather input from riders (Bremerton Sun)
Glacier Peak to be watched closer for eruptions (Everett Herald)
Group formed on Everett homelessness (Everett Herald)
4th district candidates talk up Hanford (Yakima Herald Republic, Kennewick Herald)
Group urges pot laws tightened on in-car use (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Big tidal wetland created near Cathlamet (Longview News)
Flat water fee considered in Port Angeles (Port Angeles News)
Clallam auditor race reviewed (Port Angeles News)
Seattle cops test body cameras (Seattle Times)
Halfway mark reached in light rail extension (Seattle Times)
Avista moving some big gas lines (Spokane Spokesman)
Selah considers 'all inclusive' park (Yakima Herald Republic)

On the front pages

news

The Tuesday Twin Falls debate was the last chance for Idaho Superintendent of Public Instruction candidate Sherry Ybarra to turn things around for her struggling campaign, and the debate may have helped. She presented herself as the experienced education professional she is, and her connection to the school-level education picture - her opponent, Jana Jones, has spent a lot of time in recent years in state-level education work - may have come across as appealing to a number of voters. Did it do enough to turn things around?

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

CCDC planning condo project in Boise (Boise Statesman)
Boise Hawks seeking a new stadium (Boise Statesman)
Battle over Boise bike lanes coming to head (Boise Statesman)
Fewer people lacking health insurance now (IF Post Register)
Superintendent prospects Jones, Ybarra debate (IF Post Register, TF Times News)
Congressional concern on Lochsa land exchange (Lewiston Tribune)
Canyon Co food co-op may open in January (Nampa Press Tribune)
Melba schools may try bond election (Nampa Press Tribune)
SWAT dispute between Bannock Co, Fort Hall (Pocatello Journal)

OSU commbatting sex assaults (Corvallis Gazette)
Heavy rain in western Oregon (Corvallis Gazette)
KF Community Lounge will stay open (KF Herald & News)
Medford still working on pot tax measure (Medford Tribune)
New Hermiston manager points to water need (Pandleton E Oregonian)
Profiling 4th district House race (Portland Oregonian)
Using DNA technology for pot strains (Portland Oregonian)
Federal rule would limit photography in wilderness (Salem Statesman Journal)

Ferry sysrem waiting for new director (Bremerton Sun)
More discussion ahead about oil trains (Everett Herald)
Unemployment up in South Sound (Olympian)
Kilmer proposes bill on mining asteroids (Port Angeles News)
Clallam county still delays on pot decision (Port Angeles News)
Tharinger visits Clallam on various issues (Port Angeles News)
Streetcar line for First Hill gets ready (Seattle Times)
Amazon.com and the gender pay gap (Seattle Times)
Spokane might measure sewage pot traces (Spokane Spokesman)
Tacoma council backs gun background checks (Tacoma News Tribune)
Developer lines out plans for Chambers Bay (Tacoma News Tribune)
Lewis-McChord may close medical command (Tacoma News Tribune)
Considering budget cuts to colleges (Vancouver Columbian)
Teachers blast Yakima special ed approach (Yakima Herald Republic)

On the front pages

news

The biggest Northwest story of the day was environmental: A finding in one study that wind patterns, more than human activity specifically, in large part may have been causing the warmer than normal winters in the Pacific Northwest (and may again this year). The story is likely to be misread as a shot against global climate warming, but the academics who worked on it were specific that it was not, that the phenomenon they reviewed was a specific regional development, not global, and just one factor among many.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Middleton ends contract with sheriffs office (Boise Statesman)
Bison from Yellowston may be spread around (Boise Statesman)
Asotin sheriff's race turning bitter on ad (Lewiston Tribune)
Warm weather expected in region this fall (Lewiston Tribune)
Profiling new Schweitzer engineereing CEO (Moscow News)
Moscow considers beer, wine at farmers market (Moscow News)
Idaho health exchange will have 261 plans (Nampa Press Tribune)
Property tax homeowner exemption will rise (Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News)
Are Idaho drivers rudest nationwide? (Pocatello Journal)

Strong job growth noted in Benton (Corvallis Gazette)
Two school board slots filled at Corvallis (Corvallis Gazette)
Batch of OSU parking permits sell out fast (Corvallis Gazette)
Aaron Jones, Eugene lumber exec, dies (Eugene Register Guard)
City hall demolition creeping ahead (Eugene Register Guard)
KF council reviews pot revenue potential (KF Herald & News)
Debate over Cave Junction anti-bullying (Medford Tribune)
Medford looks at viaduct improvements (Medford Tribune)
Drone test range gets final OK (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Editorial boards host governor debate (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Pacific temps linked to wind patterns? (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Josephine sheriff seeks civilian help (Portland Oregonian)
Profiling race in OR 1st congressional (Portland Oregonian)
Salem holds off pot rule decision (Salem Statesman Journal)

Report says stalled ferry wasn't overloaded (Seattle Times, Bremerton Sun)
New rules possible for gun ranges (Bremerton Sun)
Legislators urge shakeup in ferry (Everett Herald)
BNSF Railroad limiting access to beach trail (Everett Herald)
Richland starts building 4th fire station (Kennewick Herald)
Thurston community TV upgrades equipment (Olympian)
Simpson lumber company may sell (Olympian)
Moving toward finish on biomass plant build (Port Angeles News)
Study: Pacific coast may be warmer due to winds (Seattle Times, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Olympian)
Warnings of 15% cut in state college funds (Seattle Times)
Major drop in teen pregnancy at Spokane (Spokane Spokesman)
Wednesday quake may have hit Seattle Fault (Tacoma News Tribune)
Pinchot Forest HQ moves to Army barracks in 16 (Vancouver Columbian)

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

More people show at Nez Perce Co fair (Lewiston Tribune)
Record grain harvest in northern Idaho (Lewiston Tribune)
Moscow-Pullman climate-awareness march held (Moscow News)
ID minimum wage half of living wage (Moscow News)
BioLife Plasma plans Nampa opening (Nampa Press Tribune)
COMPASS looks at I-84 plans (Nampa Press Tribune)

Efforts to bring back monarch butterflies (Medford Tribune)
Renaming a bridge for Al Densmore (Medford Tribune)
Containing the Scoggins Creek fire (Portland Oregonian)

Green Mountain Mining hours expand (Everett Herald)
Voting post card goes out to voters (Everett Herald)
Longview had a hot summer (Longview News)
Charity costs at hospitals declining (Olympian)
Tacoma considers how to keep text messages (Tacoma News Tribune)
Oregon considers response to pot initiative (Vancouver Columbian)
Reviewing House race in District 17 (Vancouver Columbian)

On the front pages

news

The transfer of Spokane's Catholic bishop, Blase Cupich, to become archbishop at the country's third-largest archdiocese at Chicago, got some coverage in Sunday's papers but not as prominently as might have been expected. (There was some Saturday as well.) Cupich was often described as, in the context of higher-level church leaders, a middle-roader, generally sticking to official Vatican policy but urging a low-key and calm approach to those who disagree. That could be an indicator of where the church's leadership may be headed at the moment.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Reviewing Spokane archbishop move to Chicago (Boise Statesman)
High tech startup companies in Boise (IF Post Register)
Lawmakers comment on Luna budget plan (Nampa Press Tribune)
Nampa tries to grow a night life (Nampa Press Tribune)
Muslims prepare to open Pocatello mosque (Pocatello Journal)
Were other cities invoiced for roads by Pocatello? (Pocatello Journal)
20/20 Produce signs major contract (TF Times News)

One more vote to city hall decision (Eugene Register Guard)
Possible biofuels plant for Lakeview (KF Herald & News)
Profiling governor candidate Richardson (Medford Tribune)
Reviewing congressional races in Oregon (Portland Oregonian)
Investigating a whistleblower's tale (Salem Statesman Journal)
Salem considers pot shop rules (Salem Statesman Journal)

Jefferson jail makes med mistakes (Bremerton Sun)
Boeing speeding up to meet 787 demand (Everett Herald)
Longview sued over tap water quality (Longview News)
Concerns about spraying in Willapa Bay (Longview News)
WA considers app for remote doctor's visit (Longview News)
Shoe seller leaving downtown Olympia (Olympian)
Port Angeles utility rates may rise (Port Angeles News)
Debate over language in gun initiative (Seattle Times)
Reviewing ID superintent schools race (Spokane Spokesman)
Tacoma art museum sees expansion plan (Tacoma News Tribune)
Hospitals seeing less charity care (Tacoma News Tribune)
Reviewing ways to deal with problem cops (Vancouver Columbian)
Wenatchee tries downtown public market (Yakima Herald Republic)
Reviewing archbishop move Spokane to Chicago (Yakima Herald Republic)