Archive for the 'First Take' Category

Feb 26 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

University adjuncts protest for better pay (Boise Statesman, Lewiston Tribune, Moscow News)
More research into how sagebrush survive (Boise Statesman)
Lewiston police short on ammo supplies (Lewiston Tribune)
Legislators says 2nd amendment activists harassing (Pocatello Journal, Moscow News)
Moscow-Pullman airport work near start (Moscow News)
Anti-bully measure introduced at legislature (Nampa Press Tribune)
Citizenship test bill runs into problems (Nampa Press Tribune)

Fewer hospitalist doctors available (Eugene Register Guard)
KCC leader will stay at Klamath (KF Herald & News)
Numbers of Oregon wolves on increase (KF Herald & News)
Kitzhaber’s appointees halted at Senate (Medford Tribune)
Heavy absentees in Oregon schools may affect budgets (Medford Tribune)
Pendleton tries to create public database (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Legislators prepare to fund schools budget (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Economy looking good for eastern Oregon (Pendleton E Oregonian)
IRS looking into Kitzhaber finances too (Portland Oregonian)
The difficulties of prosecuting bike theives (Portland Oregonian)
Vaccine requirement bill meeting canceled (Salem Statesman Journal)

Some health insurance recipients overbilled (Bremerton Sun)
About grizzly bear restoration efforts (Everett Herald)
Lovick delivers state of Snohomish speech (Everett Herald)
Inslee doesn’t talk taxes to air industry leaders (Everett Herald)
Longview community house has financial trouble (Longview News)
Impacts of low-snow winter on power weighed (Longview News)
Discussing costs of legislator travel (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Olympia courts might move to downtown (Olympian)
Feds study new arco protections (Port Angeles News)
Seattle downtown workers using more non-car transit (Seattle Times)
Microsoft managers fires over expenses (Seattle Times)
Gig Harbor tax activists want vote on building (Tacoma News Tribune)
Still more about ‘In God we trust’ (Vancouver Columbian)

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Feb 25 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Reviewing infill developments in Boise (Boise Statesman)
CCA settles lawsuit with nurse (Boise Statesman)
Legislature retains ban on imported elk (Lewiston Tribune)
New development planned for 6th & Jackson (Moscow News)
Legislative conflicts over violent offender list (Nampa Press Tribune)
Effort continues to toughen seat belt law (Nampa Press Tribune)

Astoria port hit by string of lawsuits (Astorian)
Warrenton debates what to do about pot (Astorian)
More vaccinations set at UO, on meningococcal (Eugene Register Guard)
Documentary over Klamath Basin appears (KF Herald & News)
More than 200 Jackson Co student miss shot deadline (Medford Tribune)
School moves into former grocery store building (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Growth seen in wolf numbers, but not attacks (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Irrigon public library prepares to reopen doors (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Poor tenants aren’t getting water bill discounts (Portland Oregonian)
Looking at cleanliness of Portland air (Portland Oregonian)
Early spring air hitting allergies (Salem Statesman Journal)

Hood River Chum numbers recovering (Bremerton Sun)
Refinancing bonding may save Kitsap $2.5m (Bremerton Sun)
Wildfire response law may be expanded for other uses (Everett Herald)
Toutle school bond passes by 1 vote (Longview News)
Donations to United Way drop off (Longview News)
Lewis-McChord group going to Afghanistan (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Resignation noted for businness development leader (Port Angeles News)
Seattle’s new seawall may help salmon runs (Seattle Times)
Reviewing new Spokane convention center (Spokane Spokesman)
‘In God we trust’ okayed for county display (Vancouver Columbian)
Bill would allow agencies to appeal audits (Yakima Herald Republic)
Selah rejects high density housing (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Feb 24 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Lemp Apothecary pharmacy will close (Boise Statesman)
AG figures a St Luke’s tax plan is illegal (Boise Statesman)
Work resumes in west coast porta (Lewiston Tribune)
Barbieri asks about swallowing a vaginal camera (Nampa Press Tribune, Lewiston Tribune)
Legislators look at urban renewal statutes (Lewiston Tribune)
Moscow-Pullman airport funds considered (Moscow News)
Profiling new state prison directory Kempf (Nampa Press Tribune)
Considering Pocatello school leader prospects (Pocatello Journal)

State looks into leak of Kitzhaber emails (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard)
BuRec looks into changing weather planning (KF Herald & News)
Obama community college plan debated in Oregon (KF Herald & News)
School districts deficient in anti-bullying effort (Medfodd Tribune)
No plans yet for fixing E Oregon bridges (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Moving rapidly on state ethics efforts (Pendleton E Orgonian)
Legislature would bar ‘gay conversion therapy’ (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Looking into anti-vaccination advocates (Portland Oregonian)
Ocean acidification threatening oysters (Salem Statesman Journal)
Brown will move into Mahonia Hall (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bremerton treatment plant will get a lid top (Bremerton Sun)
State plans major water cleanup (Bremerton Sun)
Student enrollment at Everett above expectations (Everett Herald)
Study notes ocean acification in WA planning (Longview News)
Measles quarantine ropes in 20 (Port Angeles News)
Oil industry opposes Inslee energy plan (Seattle Times)
Debate over sending money to Somalia (Seattle Times)
Pushing for vote on ‘In God we trust’ (Vancover Columbian)
Legislators, tribes talk pot legalization (Yakima Herald Republic)
Ports returning to work (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Feb 23 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Idaho develops a sage grouse plan (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
Life’s Kitchen plans startup in Garden City (Boise Statesman)
Group links dam breaching, food for orcas (Lewiston Tribune)

Developer plans subdivision on orchard (Eugene Register Guard)
Anti-vaccine activists defend their view (Eugene Register Guard)
Possible hazards in logjam at Los Creek Lake (Medford Tribune)
Bill to allow unpaid parental leave considered (Portland Oregonian)
Profiling new Governor Brown (Salem Statesman Journal)

Looking at roads plan in Snohomish (Everett Herald)
Anti-vaccine activists defend their view (Longview News)
Inslee’s teacher pay raise plan debated (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
State looks at money for escalator reviews (Olympian)
West coast ports going back to business (Seattle Times)
New approaches for teacher development (Seattle Times)
Vancouver council looks into affordable housing (Vancouver Columbian)
Protests underway for ‘In God we trust’ (Vancouver Columbian)

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Feb 22 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Looking at the justice reinvestment initiative (Boise Statesman)
Legislators consider indigent care costs (Boise Statesman)
On the difficulty of finding low-pay rural teachers (Lewiston Tribune)

Review panel blasts Lane Community College (Eugene Register Guard)
Gro-Volution aimed at small-scale farming (KF Herald & News)
West coast ports get back to business (KF Herald & News)
Brown and legislators match up on agendas (Portland Oregonian)
What should people do encountering panhandlers? (Portland Oregonian)

Ferry diesel spill deemed human error (Bremerton Sun)
Bainbridge considers bigger traffic corridor (Bremerton Sun)
Exploring the difficulties of pot business (Everett Herald)
Longview port argues for Haven Energy (Longview News)
State road funding has improved (Longview News)
Law enforcement bill would cut public access (Olympian)
Expanding occurrances of measles on peninsula (Port Angeles News)
Exploring superbig outbreak at Virginia Mason (Seattle Times)
Vast expansion in Washington breweries (Seattle Times)
Spokane area road reparing slipping (Spokabe Spokesman)
SeaTac expansion room increasingly limited (Tacoma News Tribune)
West coast ports get back to business (Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian)
New U.S. District judge comes from Vancouver (Vancouver Columbian)

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Feb 21 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Nursing shortage in Idaho still persistent (Boise Statesman)
Dredging near Lewiston nears finish for year (Lewiston Tribune)
Idaho House at odds over transport funding (Nampa Press Tribune, Lewiston Tribune)
West coast ports reach tentative settlement (Lewiston Tribune)
Deer Flat management proposal released (Nampa Press Tribune)

UO planning to inoculate 22k people there (Eugene Register Guard)
Motor voter bill progresses on party line (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard)
Brown plans continuation of death penalty halt (Eugene Register Guard, Medford Tribune, KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Klamath fair may sue county on room tax issue (KF Herald & News)
Agreement reached in ports labor battle (Portland Oregonian, Medford Tribune)
$51.6m water fund remains in Brown budget plan (Pendleton E Oregonian)
More progress with English as second language (Portland Oregonian)
Brown considers secretary state appointment (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bremerton port offers incentive to keep business (Bremerton Sun)
Agreement reached in coast ports battle (Seattle Times, Spokane Spokesman, Tacoma News Tribune, Yakima Herald Republic, Bremerton Sun, Olympian, Longview News)
Olympia rally backs Boeing (Everett Herald)
Analysis suggests Longview area safe from tsunami (Longview News)
Tommy Chong promotes pot at Seattle (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
State revenues rise a little, assist budget (Vancouver Columbian, Olympian)
Looking at bonuses for Boeing executives (Seattle Times)
New Spokane plan would limit nearly-nake baristas (Spokane Spokesman)
Options for state transport funding reviewed (Vancouver Columbian)
Clark clerk mail registration cards to voters (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima council continues to mull redistricting (Yakima Herald Republic)
Richland florist still in discrimination fight (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Feb 20 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Idaho considers creating benefit corporations (Boise Statesman)
Simpson says support grows for wilderness bill (Boise Statesman)
Esther Simplot Park project begins (Boise Statesman)
Disputes over status of juvenile corrections (Nampa Press Tribune)
Highway work bill clears Idaho House (Nampa Press Tribune)

Oregon likely will get kicker refunds (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, Pendleton E Oregonian)
UO pushing to vaccinate students (Eugene Register Guard)
Tribes concerned with Sinapore land purchase (KF Herald & News)
Bureau of Reclamation accused of mismanagement (KF Herald & News)
Hearing on pot pulls about 50 locals (KF Herald & News)
Medford considers homeless ‘feeding area’ (Medford Tribune)
Jackson Co deputy’s ticket dismissals reviewed (Medford Tribune)
Irrigon library may reopen (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Brown Administration kicks in (Portland Oregonian)
Public employee differential pay considered (Salem Statesman Journal)

Growth in Olympic park visits (Bremerton Sun)
State about to set Narrow Bridge toll raise (Bremerton Sun)
Gas prices rising, but slowly (Everett Herald)
Last Snohomish independent hospital may ally (Everett Herald)
Longview crime not greatly increasing (Longview News)
Hearing crowd concerned over Haven propane docks (Longview News)
Inslee signs first bill of session (Olympian)
Third peninsula measles case found (Port Angeles News)
Clallam economic board polls on smaller board (Port Angeles News)
Bertha drills through to repair pit (Seattle Times, Tacoma News Tribune)
Senate looks for new audit of WWAMI (Spokane Spokesman)
Legislator pushes bill on revenge porn (Vancouver Columbian)
How far up Columbia would tsunami push? (Vancouver Columbian)

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Feb 19 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Ada County upgrades election system (Boise Statesman)
Air Force secretary arrives in Idaho (Boise Statesman)
New Oregon governor sworn in (Boise Statesman)
What about the old Nampa library building? (Nampa Press Tribune)
Schools preparing to go broadband-dark (Nampa Press Tribune)
Invasion of wild turkeys in Pocatello (Pocatello Journal)

Brown sworn in as governor (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Tribune, KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
More Kitzhaber emails released (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard)
Eugene stadium buyers have week to pay (Eugene Register Guard)
Klamath college president finalist at Florida (KF Herald & News)
Jackson Co opposes expanding gun checks (Medford Tribune)
Upgrades planned for Power City road area (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Per-mile road tax tried by volunteers (Pendleton E Oregonian)

West coast port slowdowns have impact (Bremerton Sun)
Legislation in House would end executions (Yakima Herald Republic, Bremerton Sun)
New Oregon governor sworn in (Vancouver Columbian, Longview News, Bremerton Sun)
Snohomish Co holds off on motocross decision (Everett Herald)
Judge says Richland flower shop discriminated (Yakima Herald Republic, Kennewick Herald)
Cowlitz health care nonprofits will merge (Longview News)
Arts theatre bemoans lack of area parking (Olympian)
High emotions at fireworks ban meeting (Port Angeles News)
Port Townsend paper president retires (Port Angeles News)
Bertha moves 6 feet to repair pit (Seattle Times)
Facebook expanding to 2000 employees at Seattle (Seattle Times)
Spokane city, county battle on tax rule (Spokane Spokesman)
Toll raise on Narrow bridges nears (Tacoma News Tribune)
Wyoming might fund northwest coal port (Vancouver Columbian)
Another hearing set on ‘In Gof we trust’ (Vancouver Columbian)

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Feb 18 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

On the idea of registering violent felons (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
Lawmakers approve short-term broadband funds (Nampa Press Tribune, Lewiston Tribune)
Syringa assessed $100k penalty (Moscow News)
Aquatics center structural issues noted (Moscow News)
ISU president’s house intensively studied (Pocatello Journal)
Eminent domain limitations bill moves ahead (Pocatello Journal)

UO student dies possibly of contagion (Eugene Register Guard)
Brown prepares for swearing in (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Tribune, KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
UO sues over benefits for coaches (Eugene Register Guard)
Birding festival spots unusual species numbers (KF Herald & News)
I-5 welcome center planned at Ashland (Medford Tribune)
Salem may tighten measles vaccine rules (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Pendleton council reviews pot dispensaries (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Outdoor pot growers want ban on hemp (Portland Oregonian)

Navy won’t privatize fuel depot (Bremerton Sun)
Kilmer pushes for aid to area schools (Bremerton Sun)
Car registration costs rise at Everett (Everett Herald)
Debate rises over commercial flights at Paine (Everett Herald)
McCleary school spending could hit $6b (Vancouver Columbian, Kennewick Herald, Longview News)
Klickitat PUD seeks $2.5 power storage system (Longview News)
Washington may end vaccine exemption (Spokane Spokesman, Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian, Olympian)
Presidential primary plan pushed by Wyman (Olympian)
No more measles cases (Port Angeles News)
300 schools can’t find vaccine data (Seattle Times)
Idaho broadband proposal is dead (Spokane Spokesman)
Pierce council approves new county building (Tacoma News Tribune)
Commerce secretary visits Tacoma on trade (Tacoma News Tribune)
District voting in Yakima ordered by court (Yakima Herald Republic)
Dairies in lower Yakima ok pollution plan (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Feb 17 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Road and bridge bills arrive at legislature (Nampa Press Tribune, Lewiston Tribune)
Insurance exchange extended in WA (Lewiston Tribune)
Elk rule change could mean disease imports (Lewiston Tribune)
Legislators urge local broadband solutions (Moscow News)
Simplot Stadium won’t be in county fair (Nampa Press Tribune)

Kitzhaber and Brown out of public eye (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Tribune, KF Herald & News)
I-5 viaduct at Medford studies for safety (Medford Tribune)
Area schools allow open enrollment (Medford Tribune)
Umatilla Co courthouse gun ban reviewed (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Hillsboro data centers yield 1 job per 175k (Portland Oregonian)
Oregon considers stronger vaccine law (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bill would allow simple majority for bonds (Bremerton Sun)
Bill would limit Boeing tax breaks for jobs (Everett Herald)
Extension of Oso donation deadline (Everett Herald)
Interview with new Longview city manager (Longview News)
Pam Roach admonished by Lt Gov Owens (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Voters may get another vote on class size (Olympian)
Harbor Patrol ending with no funds (Olympian)
Port Angeles hospital raises measles tent (Port Angeles News)
Port Angeles may ban fireworks (Port Angeles News)
Trade programs growing at N Idaho College (Spokane Spokesman)
Zoo finds places for aquarium (Tacoma News Tribune)
Few of WA mentally ill are hospitalized (Tacoma New Tribune)
Reviewing legislature’s transport package (Vancouver Columbian)
Klickitat PUD plans power storage system (Yakima Herald Republic)
Insurance exchange deadline extended (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Feb 15 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

West Ada plans new construction funding (Boise Statesman)
Another look at the Snake Dam breaching debate (Lewiston Tribune)
Breakfast program at Vallivue at risk (Nampa Press Tribune)
Why Idaho has a low vaccination rate (Nampa Press Tribune)
Where does Old Town Pocatello go next? (Pocatello Journal)

Activists urge Kitzhaber to drop death sentences (Eugene Register Guard)
Feds go after the fisher weasel in Kkamath area (KF Herald & News)
Pot public hearing planned next week (KF Herald & News)
Incoming governor Brown profiled (Medford Tribune)
Evaluating punishments in schools (Medford Tribune)
Another look at Kitzhaber (Portland Oregonian, Salem Statesman Journal)

Clearwater Casino planned to open in June (Bremerton Sun)
Teaching review proposals at issue (Everett Herald)
Family of Pasco cop shooting victim sues city (Kennewick Herald)
Why health exchange enrollments lag (Longview News)
Longview rail project looking for funds (Longview News)
Labor secretary comes to west coast ports (Seattle Times, Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Legislators try moving WA away from coal (Olympian)
Scant snow seen on Olympic peninsula (Port Angeles News)
Street parking in Seattle getting more scarce (Seattle Times)
Most who work for Spokane outearn city median (Spokane Spokesman)
Class size ballot issue may reurn to voters (Vancouver Columbian)
Evaluating measles vaccinations (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Feb 14 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Boise still has no police ombudsman (Boise Statesman)
New Senate concealed weapons bill (Boise Statesman)
Youth boot camp passes, opposed by local rep (Lewiston Tribune)
Kitzhaber resigns as governor (Lewiston Tribune)
Washington looks at police body cam use (Moscow News)
Urban renewal bills reviewed in legislature (Nampa Press Tribune)
Dixie Drain projects cleanup en route (Nampa Press Tribune)
Leader for jail expansion effort chosen (Nampa Press Tribune)

Kitzhaber resigns as governor (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Mail Tribune, KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Brown prepares to become governor (Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Mail Tribune, KF Herald & News)

Senate passes bill to mesh pot medical, other markets (Vancouver Columbian, Bremerton Sun, Longview News)
Another move to commercial air at Paine Field (Everett Herald)
Property tax increases likely at Snohomish (Everett Herald)
Oregon Governor Kitzhaber resigns (Seattle Times, Spokane Spokesman, Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian, Olympian, Longview News)
Sawmill hours reduced at Longview (Longview News)
Lacey loosened commercial sign rules (Olympian)
Effort to restart Bertha comes next week (Seattle Times)
Many in WA still can’t afford health insurance (Seattle Times)

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Feb 13 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Six same-sex marraige licenes in Idaho invalid (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune, Moscow News)
More Idaho drone companies plan their move (Boise Statesman)
Legislature reviews open meeting penalties (Boise Statesman)
Whitman farm cleared for pot planting (Lewiston Tribune)
WA justices agree with WSU golf on water (Moscow News)
12th avenue gets development attention (Nampa Press Tribune)
Bill would pull Idaho from common core group (Nampa Press Tribune)
Concealed weapons bills hit legislature (TF Times News)

State officials urge Kitzhaber resignation (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Tribune, KF Register Guard, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Property manager and money vanish (Eugene Register Guard)
Salem warns about owl attacking joggers (KF Herald & News)
Medford area eagle killed by poison (Medford Tribune)
Senators moving on timber payment bill (Medford Tribune)
Fed budget could cut conservation research (Pendleton E Oregonian)

School districts review vaccination policy (Bremerton Sun)
State roads bill hits $570m (Seattle Times, Vancouver Columbian, Everett Herald)
Campbell named city manager (Longview News)
Chorus of calls for Kitzhaber resignation (Vancouver Columbian, Longview News)
Legislature sees push for gas tax increase (Tacoma News Tribune, Yakima Herald Republic, Olympian)
Big new Amazon fulfillman center at DePont (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Bill would limit lawsuit awards in records cases (Olympian)
Another measles case on the peninsula (Port Angeles News)
North Idaho waters near flooding (Spokane Spokesman)
Building book seen in Kootenai apartments (Spokane Spokesman)
Tacoma graduation rate exceeds the state’s (Tacoma News Tribune)
Leaders in Washougal oppose oil terminal (Vancouver Columbian)

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Feb 12 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

School broadband shutdown nears (Boise Statesman, TF Times News)
Portland loss of Hanjin shipping hits Lewiston (TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune)
Asotin County likely home to a wolf pack (Lewiston Tribune)
Multicultural center set at WSU (Moscow News)
Corrections seeks staff pay raise (Nampa Press Tribune)
Canyon sued by ambulance company (Nampa Press Tribune)
Bannock fair future returns for consideration (Pocatello Journal)
Superintendent at Gooding quits (TF Times News)

Kitzhaber: I won’t resign; Brown returns early (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Tribune, KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Big housing firm turned over to received (Eugene Register Guard)
Uber trying for Eugene entry again (Eugene Register Guard)
Weather makes wolf tracking hard (KF Herald & News)
Finally, new snow at reopening Mt Ashland (Medford Tribune)
New viticulture area at Milton-Freewater (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Portland Haijin loss hits inland too (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Brewers ask to use purified sewage water (Portland Oregonian)

Suquamish will work with state on pot regs (Bremerton Sun)
Inslee proposes property crime bill (Vancouver Columbian, Bremerton Sun)
Oso slide land placed for sale (Everett Herald)
Scant snow in Csacades (Everett Herald)
Weyerhauser ends Longview layoffs (Longview News)
Tons of smelt seized after illegal fishing (Longview News)
School bond failures prompt review (Port Angeles News)
Port Angeles plans for Navy ships (Port Angeles News)
Hepatitis C drugs get less expensive (Seattle Times)
Fagan won’t quit health board (Spokane Spokesman)
Tacoma port near shut down (Tacoma News Tribune, Yakima Herald Republic)
Students fall ill from candy (Vancouver Columbian)
City redistricting plan still possible (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Feb 11 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Firefighter foundation blasted for spending (Boise Statesman)
Grove Plaza may be available this summer (Boise Statesman)
Bill would allow car registration local hikes (Nampa Press Tribune, Lewiston Tribune)
Clarkston squabbles over pot (Lewiston Tribune)
More mumps cases around Northwest (Lewiston Tribune)
Examining lottery contribution to schools (Nampa Press Tribune)
9th Circuit rules St Luke’s to divest Saltzer (Nampa Press Tribune)
Idaho firm making ag drones (Pocatello Journal)
Broadband fed fund at risk $245m (TF Times News)
Former prison inmate sues judge and others (TF Times News)
TF airport renovation in long-range plan (TF Times News)

Kitzhaber denies ethics authority on Hayes (Eugene Register Guard, KF Herald & News)
Vehicle fee increase heads to May election (Eugene Register Guard)
Irrigators in Klamath get a few more options (KF Herald & News)
Talent irrigation project gets $1m grant (Medford Tribune)
Umatilla port will sell large tract (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Milton-Freewater schools may consolidate (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Another look at Hayes’ roles (Portland Oregonian)
New fish/wildlife director faces funding mess (Portland Oregonian)
AG inquiry first of an OR governor (Salem Statesman Journal)

Narrows tolls expected to rise (Bremerton Sun)
Bainbridge Island passes park, other bond (Bremerton Sun)
State sets new rule on logging (Everett Herald)
Plan released on protection from Hanford vapors (Kennewick Herald)
KapStone says mill will run, strike or no (Longview News)
Legislature looks at drone law (Olympian, Longview News)
Kalama and several others pass school bonds (Olympian, Longview News)
Peninsula school bonds on bubble (Port Angeles News)
Port Townsend Paper mill sold to Alatana firm (Port Angeles News)
State looking into First charter school (Seattle Times)
Health board member asks to quit over vaccine (Spokane Spokesman)
Most Spokane area school bonds passing (Spokane Spokesman)
Clark ‘In god we trust’ motion defeated (Vancouver Columbian)
Mixed responses on Yakima-area school bonds (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Feb 10 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Audit says state spends too much on outside lawyers (Boise Statesman, Lewiston Tribune)
ATK ammunition absorbed by Vista Outdoor (Lewiston Tribune)
Washington snowpack estimated at 39 percent (Moscow News)
Legislator proposes school civics test (Nampa Press Tribune)
Conservation plans move on Lake Lowell (Nampa Press Tribune)
Fort Hall weighs in on instant horse racing (Pocatello Journal)
Pocatello animal shelter moves into new home (Pocatello Journal)
Legislator pension increases limited by new bill (TF Times News)

Kitzhaber asks for AG inquiry (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Tribune, KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Third UO student has bacterial infection (Eugene Register Guard)
UO football coach gets $17.5m deal (Eugene Register Guard)
Klamath concerns over biofuel plant raised (KF Herald & News)
Medford got a huge storm last week (Medford Tribune)
New Jackon fair board and leaders try to revive it (Medford Tribune)
Hermiston charter goes to ballot (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Independent Party now a major party in Oregon (Portland Oregonian)
Salem considers urban renewal options (Salem Statesman Journal)

New Kitsap YWCA director (Bremerton Sun)
State seeks vapor improvement at Hanford (Kennewick Herald)
Washington snowpack at 39 percent (Kennewick Herald)
New school superintendent named at Longview (Longview News)
Iconic Mount Solo house sold (Longview News)
Initiative costs would have to be disclosed (Longview News)
Olympia port chemical spill linked to valve (Olympian)
Bill would toughen cell phone while driving law (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
What if Bertha can’t be moved? (Seattle Times)
Higher Taxes college investment lured UW president (Seattle Times)
Toll on Narrows Bridge could rise by half (Tacoma News Tribune)
Shutdown at Christensen Shipyards (Vancouver Columbian)
Forum features prospects for judge (Vancouver Columbian)

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Feb 09 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Old Ada courthouse to become new law school building (Boise Statesman)
Costs of building a community college system (Lewiston Tribune)
Progress claimed on ‘add the words’ (Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News)
Profiling Representative Ryan Kerby (Nampa Press Tribune)
Funds for heating assistance mostly gone (TF Times News)

Blachly charter schools pull more students (Eugene Register Guard)
Portland parking enforcement stepping up (Portland Oregonian)
Looking for streetlight funding (Salem Statesman Journal)

Two microbreweries head to Bremerton (Bremerton Sun)
Snohomish considers two for ombudsman job (Everett Herald)
Snohomish water center fiscal sound again (Everett Herald)
Issues with now-defunct car repair company (Longview News)
Independent Party seeks major party status in Oregon (Longview News)
Olympia considers downtown loos (Olympian)
Washington budget writers crunched, need funds (Tacoma News tribune, Olympian)
Public will weight in on peninsula cable (Port Angeles News)
Owen wants change to state ethics process (Seattle Times)
Snowpack at historically low levels (Seattle Times)
Spokane Co commission seeking to add more members (Spokane Spokesman)
Downtown streets will run to waterfront (Vancouver Columbian)
Health insurance deadline nears (Vancouver Columbian)
Plan bumps some drug cases felony to misdemeanor (Yakima Herald Republic)

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