Archive for the 'First Take' Category

Sep 22 2014

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

More people show at Nez Perce Co fair (Lewiston Tribune)
Record grain harvest in northern Idaho (Lewiston Tribune)
Moscow-Pullman climate-awareness march held (Moscow News)
ID minimum wage half of living wage (Moscow News)
BioLife Plasma plans Nampa opening (Nampa Press Tribune)
COMPASS looks at I-84 plans (Nampa Press Tribune)

Efforts to bring back monarch butterflies (Medford Tribune)
Renaming a bridge for Al Densmore (Medford Tribune)
Containing the Scoggins Creek fire (Portland Oregonian)

Green Mountain Mining hours expand (Everett Herald)
Voting post card goes out to voters (Everett Herald)
Longview had a hot summer (Longview News)
Charity costs at hospitals declining (Olympian)
Tacoma considers how to keep text messages (Tacoma News Tribune)
Oregon considers response to pot initiative (Vancouver Columbian)
Reviewing House race in District 17 (Vancouver Columbian)

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Sep 21 2014

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The transfer of Spokane’s Catholic bishop, Blase Cupich, to become archbishop at the country’s third-largest archdiocese at Chicago, got some coverage in Sunday’s papers but not as prominently as might have been expected. (There was some Saturday as well.) Cupich was often described as, in the context of higher-level church leaders, a middle-roader, generally sticking to official Vatican policy but urging a low-key and calm approach to those who disagree. That could be an indicator of where the church’s leadership may be headed at the moment.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Reviewing Spokane archbishop move to Chicago (Boise Statesman)
High tech startup companies in Boise (IF Post Register)
Lawmakers comment on Luna budget plan (Nampa Press Tribune)
Nampa tries to grow a night life (Nampa Press Tribune)
Muslims prepare to open Pocatello mosque (Pocatello Journal)
Were other cities invoiced for roads by Pocatello? (Pocatello Journal)
20/20 Produce signs major contract (TF Times News)

One more vote to city hall decision (Eugene Register Guard)
Possible biofuels plant for Lakeview (KF Herald & News)
Profiling governor candidate Richardson (Medford Tribune)
Reviewing congressional races in Oregon (Portland Oregonian)
Investigating a whistleblower’s tale (Salem Statesman Journal)
Salem considers pot shop rules (Salem Statesman Journal)

Jefferson jail makes med mistakes (Bremerton Sun)
Boeing speeding up to meet 787 demand (Everett Herald)
Longview sued over tap water quality (Longview News)
Concerns about spraying in Willapa Bay (Longview News)
WA considers app for remote doctor’s visit (Longview News)
Shoe seller leaving downtown Olympia (Olympian)
Port Angeles utility rates may rise (Port Angeles News)
Debate over language in gun initiative (Seattle Times)
Reviewing ID superintent schools race (Spokane Spokesman)
Tacoma art museum sees expansion plan (Tacoma News Tribune)
Hospitals seeing less charity care (Tacoma News Tribune)
Reviewing ways to deal with problem cops (Vancouver Columbian)
Wenatchee tries downtown public market (Yakima Herald Republic)
Reviewing archbishop move Spokane to Chicago (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 20 2014

On the front pages

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Enterovirus has become a substantial halth issue around the Northwest, and it was the biggest news story in Washington today. (There have been major headlines this week about instances in Oregon and Idaho too.) It isn’t new. Wikipedia notes that “Enteroviruses affect millions of people worldwide each year, and are often found in the respiratory secretions (e.g., saliva, sputum, or nasal mucus) and stool of an infected person. Historically, poliomyelitis was the most significant disease caused by an enterovirus, poliovirus.” We may be seeing more specificity in future reports, since the term “enterovirus” covers a lot of territory.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Redfish Lake fish numbers rising (Boise Statesman, IF Post Register)
Several treasurer’s issues cleared (Boise Statesman)
St Joe’s hospital may sever from parent (Lewiston Tribune)
Silver says treasurer questions remain (Moscow News)
Old UI Pike House will be demolished (Moscow News)
Audit finds treasurer problems corrected (Nampa Press Tribune)
More discussion about tiered teacher licenses (Nampa Press Tribune)
Canyon Co land use lawsuit dismissed (Nampa Press Tribune)
Idaho income still behind rest of nation (Pocatello Journal)
Democrats encouraging Latino voting (TF Times News)

UO gets $10 million donation for structure (Eugene Register Guard)
Eugene cops sting many sex predators (Eugene Register Guard)
State and Klamath battling over water rules (KF Herald & News)
Pot shop dealer on probation (Medford Tribune)
PGG ends retail business, searches for buyer (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Gas prices may be dropping (Portland Oregonian)
NE Portland pot dispensary location opposed (Portland Oregonian)
Scammers hitting mid-valley area hard (Salem Statesman Journal)

Restoration of some Sound waterways (Bremerton Sun)
Kitsap Co begins its budget discussions (Bremerton Sun)
Findings of enterovirus in Washington (Seattle Times, Everett Herald, Vancouver Columbian)
Gas prices may fall in the fall (Longview News)
Asphalt plant operations draw objections (Olympians)
Congressional delegation supports military action (Olympian)
Seattle gets new transportation director (Seattle Times)
Nordstrom launches first store in Canada (Seattle Times)
Spokane Catholic archbishop moves to Chicago (Spokane Spokesman)

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Sep 19 2014

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All the talk for so many months now about a bum health insurance website and who did and didn’t live up to contracts really has missed the point. The big Oregon story today (following on an OHSU study) does highlight the important development in the changes in Oregon’s health insurance picture over the last year, since Obamacare has kicked in: The number of uninsured people in the state has fallen, from about 550,000 to 202,000 – by 63%. The state estimated that 95% of Oregonians now have health insurance coverage. That’s still not perfect, and the system still has some bugs crawling around. But getting about 350,000 more people insured in the course of a few months is a massive achievement, a big success story, and a much bigger deal than whether a few hyperlinks work right on a web site.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

High occupancy in downtown Boise hotels (Boise Statesman)
Caldwell pays for study for future (Boise Statesman)
Washington state revenues shoot up (Lewiston Tribune)
New medical research clinic opens at Nampa (Nampa Press Tribune)
Stallings blasts Simpson on rural mail (TF Times News)
Hagerman faces sewer bond election (TF Times News)

Springfield mulls pot sales tax (Eugene Register Guard)
Task force has sexual assault ideas for UO (Eugene Register Guard)
New peaks for health coverage (Portland Oregonian, Salem Statesman Journal, KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Completion of water project on Sprague River (KF Herald & News)
New One West Main building in Medford opens (Medford Tribune)
Medford may foreclosure on abandoned houses (Medford Tribune)
Medford may allow alcohol into city park (Medford Tribune)
Washington Co traffic turning nightmarish (Portland Oregonian)
New West Salem boundaries set (Salem Statesman Journal)

Pot tax revenues projected at $636m (Vancouver Columbian, Bremerton Sun, Olympian)
Reviewing Supreme Court decision on schools (Bremerton Sun)
Oso area highway back to full speed soon (Everett Herald)
Shelter may provide only food, fewer beds (Longview News)
Longview city manager Bob Gregory retires (Longview News)
State employee union works on new pay level (Olympian)
Seqium employee union ballot issue in court (Port Angeles News)
Tunnel work continues as Bertha sits still (Seattle Times)
Spokane diocese sues its own lawyers (Spokane Spokesman)
New earthquake detection system developed (Tacoma News Tribune)
Land developer, Vancouver port go at it (Vancouver Columbian)
Inactive Pot shops may lose place on list (Vancouver Columbian)
Moxee nutrient plans fined (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 18 2014

On the front pages

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Big Oregon news was something relatively routine and simply tracking with existing state law: An increase in the state minimum wage, to $9.25 an hour. Oregon continues behind Washington as having the second-highest minimum wage in the country. Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian supported the increase, but it essentially followed the guidelines set up in state law, requiring that increases occur alongside inflationary costs of living.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Cool wet weather may affect potato crop (IF Post Register)
Wildfires roar near highway 12 (Lewiston Tribune)
Few attend guns on campus meeting (Lewiston Tribune, Moscow News)
Will Idaho gay marriage law hit Surpeme Court? (Moscow News)
Middleton launches it own police (Nampa Press Tribune)
Nampa may create food co-op (Nampa Press Tribune)
School supplemental levies common in Idaho (Nampa Press Tribune)
Simpson, Labrador oppose Obama arms plan (TF Times News)
Idaho minimum wage half of living wage (TF Times News)

Natural Grocers opens store at Eugene (Eugene Register Guard)
Avakian wants Oregon minimum wage raise (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Eugene reconsiders YMCA land deal (Eugene Register Guard)
OIT trustees officially installed (KF Herald & News)
Smoke from wildfires may stay in air (Medford Tribune)
Does Umatilla adult moratorium violate constitution? (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Lewis & Clark legal clinic closing (Portland Oregonian)
Legislature works on college affordability (Salem Statesman Journal)
State home aid program funding set (Salem Statesman Journal)

Reid, last big Kitsap indie realtor, bought (Bremerton Sun)
Ferry offload gets left turn lane (Bremerton Sun)
Kennewick won’t launch Christian prayer (Kennewick Herald)
Massive Kelso pot organization outlined (Longview News)
Thurston jail negotiation end may be near (Olympian)
Massive Navy scan of private data, conviction tossed (Seattle Times)
Still slow going for marijuana stores (Seattle Times)
It’s no longer a SWAT team in Spokane (Spokane Spokesman)
Kokanee fishing running strong (Spokane Spokesman)
Report: 10% online gun sales to ineligibles (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Clark County trailing in economic renewal (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima wine harvest breaks new record (Yakima Herald Republic)
Pacific Power seeks 9.5% residential raise (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 17 2014

On the front pages

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The blitz fire at Weed in California was a major news story around the Northwest, not only in the newspapers around southwest Oregon (the communities around Medford are only about an hour away, and quickly sent a good deal of help southward) but also further away. The super-hot and super-fast blaze wiping out about 100 buildings hit close to home in a northwest that has seen its share of wildfires this summer, including a number edging uncomfortably close to communities. And isn’t done with its wildfires yet.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

PERSI recipients getting a pay bump (Boise Statesman)
Boise city, Community House end lawsuit (Boise Statesman)
Ybarra campaign struggling (IF Post Register)
IF council starts strategic planning (IF Post Register)
Schweitzer Laboratories, Pullman, has new CEO (Lewiston Tribune)
Big board changes on board of St. Joe’s (Lewiston Tribune)
Labrador bill hit police militarization (Nampa Press Tribune)
Bear Lake dress code under dispute (Pocatello Journal)
Ketchum city urges easing back on wolves (TF Times News)
Magic Valley 911 dispatch has high turnover (TF Times News)

Eugene sets heat record this summer (Eugene Register Guard)
Battle over sick leave may go statewide (Eugene Register Guard)
Salmon at Klamath face die-off (KF Herald & News)
Weed wildfire wipes out town (Medford Tribune)
Campaign to register voters launched (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Umatilla set adult business moratorium (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Oracle tries to move case to federal court (Portland Oregonian)
Efforts increase to contain Estacada fire (Portland Oregonian)
Estimate: third of area homeless mentally ill (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bremerton considers restoring ML King road (Bremerton Sun)
Salaries go up for Kitsap Transit (Bremerton Sun)
Big pot operation at Kelso busted (Longview News)
Cowlitz County will watch coal dust from trains (Longview News)
Retail pot in WA beginning to prosper (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Thurston County may see budget freeze (Olympian)
Move of Enchanted Chalet completed (Port Angeles News)
Seattle considers building tax for affordables (Seattle Times)
New railroad bridge sought at Sandpoint (Spokane Spokesman)
A co-UW/WSU med school partnership? (Spokane Spokesman)
Clark County makes new fireworks zones (Vancouver Columbian)
Cantwell blasts ‘Redskins’ name (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima’s council backs election by district (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 16 2014

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Top Washington story is the growing (emerging) battle between the University of Washington and Washington State University over WSU’s proposal to establish its own medical school.

The idea has an extravagant ring to it but the bigger-picture justification could be there. UW’s well-regarded school is hemmed in for growth, limited in its expansion options at a time when projections suggest a need for greater numbers of physicians around the Northwest. The niche would be a med school aimed more strictly at training physicians, leaving most of the advanced research (for which UW is well known) at Seattle. The training element need is becoming clearer with time. Idaho State University leaders have discussed the idea of a med school there, and although that project may be a heavy lift for the smaller institution and state, it reflects real needs and pressures. The WSU project may have enough force to carry it at least to early stages of development.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Radar may help avoid elk crashes on 75 (Boise Statesman)
NW Boise annexation battle ahead (Boise Statesman)
Lewiston considers possible park ideas (Lewiston Tribune)
State panel considers teacher pay levels (Lewiston Tribune)
Latah gets an armored vehicle from Bonner (Moscow News)
40 places in Pullman may be historic-designated (Moscow News)
Carl’s Jr gets contentious parking variance (Nampa Press Tribune)
Reviewing high school-college dual credit (Nampa Press Tribune)
Balukoff staff pay arrangement found legal (TF Times News)
Reviewing TF’s dangerous intersections (TF Times News)

Eugene schools ask for levy support (Eugene Register Guard)
Onion fire near Grants Pass grows (Medford Tribune)
Corps ends review of coal terminal (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Estacada fire yield lots of smoke (Portland Oregonian)
Cover Oregon error smaller than expected (Portland Oregonian)
Hillcrest younth prison may shut down (Salem Statesman Journal)
Food companies against anti-GMO measure (Salem Statesman Journal)

Overtime for firefighters hits budget (Bremerton Sun)
Grant brings more dental service to Kitsap (Bremerton Sun)
UW blasts plan for WSU med school (Spokane Spokesman, Kennewick Herald)
Small towns worry about more train traffic (Longview News)
Smoke covers NW Oregon (Vancouver Columbian, Longview News)
WA state revenues continue rising (Yakima Herald Republic, Olympian)
Thurston Energy gives conservation rebates (Olympian)
Amazon plans $1 data center in Ohio (Seattle Times)
On a push to build casinpo in Bremerton (Seattle Times)
Twisp area rebuilds progressing (Spokane Spokesman)
Concerns about lowering Lake Pend Oreille (Spokane Spokesman)
Vancouver looks at new fire station sites (Vancouver Columbian)
Clark Co fair audit yields mixed report (Vancouver Columbian)

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Sep 15 2014

On the front pages

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Dog training sought for cops (Boise Statesman)
Caldwell starts rebrnading program (Nampa Press Tribune)
Environmental groups may sue over wolves (Nampa Press Tribune)
Idaho increasing faster on obesity (Nampa Press Tribune)
Reviewing Magic Valley’s missing persons (TF Times News)
After 26 yrs, Kelly’s Restaurant closes (TF Times News)
Balukoff staffing accounting draws fiire (TF Times News)

Medford looks to its NE, SE as growth areas (Medford Tribune)
Medford looks to clean up Bear Creek (Medford Tribune)
Lloyd Center ice rink may be scale back (Portland Oregonian)
Major wildfire near Estacada (Portland Oregonian)
Salem considers restricting outdoor smoking (Salem Statesman Journal)
Legislative days this week at statehouse (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bremerton leaders oppose new casino (Bremerton Sun)
Kilmer goes after VA health issues (Bremerton Sun)
State sales tax hurts on inequality (Longview News)
I-5 traffic jam doesn’t happpen (Olympian)
Port Angeles considering city utility rates (Port Angeles News)
WA businesses concerned about Im-Ex funding (Seattle Times)
Fewer hospital charity cases unde Obamacare (Seattle Times)
I-90 freeway lighting replaced near Spokane (Spokane Spokesman)
502, linking I-5 and Battle Ground, progresses (Vancouver Columbian)
Conflict over gun initiative at local level (Vancouver Columbian)

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Sep 14 2014

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Fast construction again at Harris Ranch (Boise Statesman)
Will ‘Otter fatigue’ help Balukoff? (Boise Statesman, IF Post Register, TF Times News)
School funding varies by district (IF Post Register)
FCC subpoenas Idaho’s broadband deal (IF Post Register)
Lewiston consider large new park (Lewiston Tribune)
Caldwell celebrates C of I football return (Nampa Press Tribune)
More diverse cultures in Magic Valley (TF Times News)

Taxis complain about ride-share business (Eugene Register Guard)
Overview of Measure 91 on pot (KF Herald & News)
Possible dry winter ahead in southern Oregon (Medford Tribune)
Medford professionals study site selection (Medford Tribune)
High cost of Hep C pill treatment (Portland Oregonian)
Polk County lwa enforcement struggles (Salem Statesman Journal)

Kitsap considers gun ranges, safety rules (Bremeton Sun)
Enchanted chalet moved 70 feet from edge (Bremeton Sun)
Cowlitz on top for criminal cases (Longview News)
Salmon returning in upper Elwha (Port Angeles News)
Pot grower pulls out of project (Port Angeles News)
Angry debate over cuts to elected pay (Port Angeles News)
Behind the probllems at Mars Hill (Seattle Times)
Service slow for mentally ill criminally charged (Seattle Times)
Spokane’s utilities leader shakes it up (Spokane Spokesman)
Closer criminal screens for county fair workers (Tacoma News Tribune)
More growth in Ridgefield (Vancouver Columbian)
Clark prosecutor candidate resume disputed (Vancouver Columbian)

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Sep 13 2014

On the front pages

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

FCC investigates Idaho’s broadband deal (Boise Statesman, IF Post Register)
Hop farmers benefiting from craft brewing (Boise Statesman)
At Mtn Home, A-10 crafts nears end of life (Boise Statesman)
Boise County sends murder case on road (IF Post Register)
WSU regents okay medical school (Lewiston Tribune, Moscow News)
WSU names building for Keith Jackson (Moscow News)
Four-way stop set for Middleton-Linden (Nampa Press Tribune)
Sportsplex Idaho names Meridian for site (Nampa Press Tribune)
Salmon Reservoir has toxic algae (TF Times News)

Lots of salmon in Columbia runs (Eugene Register Guard)
Participants try ballot issue speed deciding (Eugene Register Guard)
UO seeking smarter students (Eugene Register Guard)
Movie company boosts rural Klamath (KF Herald & News)
Canal might run under Highway 39 (KF Herald & News)
Jackson renews library operations contract (Medford Tribune)
Quake might demolissh I-5 viaduct (Medford Tribune)
Fish and game fees may rise (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Marijuana legalization debate in Portland (Portland Oregonian, Salem Statesman Journal)
False alarm at Mt St Helens eruption (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bremerton port may sell development property (Bremerton Sun)
Enterovirus may be spreading in Washington (Everett Herald)
Whitehorse trail near Oso may be restored (Everett Herald, Olympian)
66 pot tickets from one office may be dropped (Seattle Times)
Lt gov fined on ethics charge on band fundraisers (Seattle Times)
Spokane cops consider video strategy (Spokane Spokesman)
Work begins on Steilacoom bridge (Tacoma News Tribune)
Group fights Clark Co home rule plan (Vancouver Columbian)
Powers of C-Tran board depend on members (Vancouver Columbian)
WSU regents okay medical school (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 12 2014

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Eberle will leave Boise city council (Boise Statesman)
Yellowstone models possible ‘supereruption’ (IF Post Register)
Blast near old Teton Dam went well (IF Post Register)
Odyssey charter school revoked; no appeal (IF Post Register)
WA Supreme Court holds legislature in contempt (Lewiston Tribune)
WSU regents considering medical school (Moscow News)
Bolz running for CWI trustee (Nampa Press Tribune)
TF downtown stores seek more lenient parking (TF Times News)
Megic Valley emergency dispatch understaffed (TF Times News)

UO’s different kind of presidential search (Eugene Register Guard)
Adding new names to Klamath 911 memorial (KF Herald & News)
Police shooting found justified (Medford Tribune)
Hermiston will map crime hot spots (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Emmanuel Community Services leader takes leave (Portland Oregonian)
Cover Oregon tax mistake hits Marion hard (Salem Statesman Journal)

WA Supreme Court hold legislature in contempt (Seattle Times, Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Bremerton Sun, Olympian, Longview News, Port Angeles News)
WSU may build medical school (Spokane Spokesman, Kennewick Herald)
Engineering cranks up again at vit plan (Kennewick Herald)
PETA plans anti-hunting signs at Longview (Longview News)
Children hit with severe respiratory disease (Seattle Times, Olympian)
Well contamination issues at Liberty Lake (Spokane Spokesman)
State fires set 1-year acreage record (Tacoma News Tribune)
Wind cuts power at Vancouver (Vancouver Columbian)
Uneasy transition to e-medical records (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 11 2014

On the front pages

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Payette Brewery (Garden City) poised to grow (Boise Statesman)
IF sees enterovirus cases (IF Post Register)
Hobby Lobby may open store at Ammon (IF Post Register)
Hixon said to have misused campaign funds (Nampa Press Tribune)
Panera Bread Bakery may build in Nampa (Nampa Press Tribune)
Bottled water only in Raft River for now (TF Times News)

NW pot producers will need mroe electricity (Corvallis Gazette)
More new school students than were expected (Corvallis Gazette)
Parts of Oregon at high fire danger (Corvallis Gazette)
Eugene city hall work closes some offices (Eugene Register Guard)
Unveiling new Made in Oregon on 5th street (Eugene Register Guard)
Running Y ranch may see major upgrades (KF Herald & News)
Oregon schools test scores released Medford Tribune, Pendleton E Oregonian
Question raised on prison inmate shooting (Portland Oregonian)
South Salem park plan draws neighbor critics (Salem Statesman Journal)

New state ferries chief chosen (Seattle Times, Tacoma News Tribune, Bremerton Sun)
Changes in funding for Sheldon Senate race (Bremerton Sun)
Cowlitz, Wahkiakum approve garbage deal (Longview News)
Olympia church starts homeless shelter (Olympian)
Pot grow site will be assessed (Port Angeles News)
Senate challenge also backs zombie TV show (Spokane Spokesman)
Vancouver councils considers blocking oil (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima reconsiders massage licenses (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 10 2014

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Boise police evaluate homeless policy (Boise Statesman)
‘Part time Indian’ book returns to West Ada (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
Will WA property managers ban pot? (Moscow News)
Vallivue changes its tax levies (Nanpa Press Tribune)
Caldwell chamber seeks signature event (Nampa Press Tribune)
Canyon jumpers still planning event (TF Times News)

Variable school scores (Portland Oregonian, Corvallis Gazette, KF Herald & News)
Cameras watching for forest fires (Eugene Register Guard)
New ownership for Running Y ranch (KF Herald & News)
Charter cable may be bought by Comcast (Medford Tribune)
The path to eliminating Cover Oregon (Salem Statesman Journal, Pendleton E Oregonian)

Bitter debate over state House seat (Bremerton Sun)
Enchanted Valley Chalet moved (Bremerton Sun, Port Angeles News)
Clatskanie city attorney quits (Longview News)
Clallam officials pay may be cut (Port Angeles News)
Bellevue activists push for $15 minimum wage (Seattle Times)
WA court: Cell phone used for public use, public (Tacoma News Tribune)
C-TRAN okays labor contract (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima tries again on billboard rules (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 09 2014

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Revolution concert house sued as nuisance (Boise Statesman)
Idaho gay marriage case hits 9th circuit (Boise Statesman, IF Post Register, TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune)
Former first lady Jacque Batt dies (Boise Statesman, TF Times News)
Clarkston looks again at zoning for pot (Lewiston Tribune)
Houses threatened by grass fire (Moscow News)
Syringa Mobile Home park case continues (Moscow News)
Evaluating changed Nampa downtown traffic (Nampa Press Tribune)
TF preparing for another canyon rocket ride (TF Times News)

Corvallis yield large crowd on pot debate (Corvallis Gazette)
Warning signs posted at Hagg drawning site (Corvallis Gazette)
Ownership change at Euphoria Chocolate Co (Eugene Register Guard)
Debate rages on old city hall building (Eugene Register Guard)
Cover Oregon works on correcting tax error (KF Herald & News)
Medford Rogues calls halt to cage fights (Medford Tribune)
Deer herds near Roseburg hit by disease (Medford Tribune)
Pendleton missed ballot deadline for bond (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Ambre energy appeals state terminal rejection (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Pendleton will keep crime lab (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Legislators too propose ending Cover Oregon (Portland Oregonian, Salem Statesman Journal)
What’s the future for Treasurer Wheeler? (Salem Statesman Journal)

Senior projects end in WA schools (Bremerton Sun)
Tri-City schools see higher enrollment (Kennewick Herald)
Hop farmers grow big 29,000 acres of hops (Kennewick Herald)
Workers say prison violence data skewed (Kennewick Herald)
Wyoming joins suit on OR coal terminal block (Longview News)
Values of property still upward in Cowlitz (Longview News)
I-5 Olympia work will mean traffic jams (Olympian)
Seattle will turn vacant lots into mini-parks (Seattle Times)
Idaho gay marriage ban hits 9th circuit (Spokane Spokesman)
Mars Hill cut back at Tacoma (Tacoma News Tribune)
Longshoremen back ‘superior’ grain deal (Vancouver Columbian)
Spas at Yakima examined for sex trafficking (Yakima Herald Republic)
Yakima sheriff candidates do battle (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 08 2014

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Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Gay marriage cases go to appeals court (Boise Statesman, Lewiston Tribune, Moscow News)
Ombudsman considers records law changes (Lewiston Tribune, TF Times News)
Public reviews Nampa charter school plan (Nampa Press Tribune)
Growing the Caldwell greenbelt (Nampa Press Tribune)
Luna awards $271 in staff bonuses (TF Times News)

Timberhill fire called human-caused (Corvallis Gazette)
UO program focuses on childhood obesity (Eugene Register Guard)
Western gay marriage cases in court (Eugene Register Guard)
Smoke from fire may go away today (Eugene Register Guard, Medford Tribune)
State helps Phoenix employment hub (Medford Tribune)
Cogen becomes charter school group leader (Portland Oregonian)
Riverfront Park sees pipeline costs (Salem Statesman Journal)

New hardware tore in Bremerton (Bremerton Sun)
Possible new forest rules on logging safety (Everett Herald)
Jail considers ICE deportation procedures (Everett Herald)
Reviewing 4th district House race (Kennewick Herald)
Damage from abandoned crab pots (Olympian)
Lewis-McChord soldiers sent to Asia (Olympian)
Sequim considers city hall building options (Port Angeles News)
Mars Hill church cutting back, laying off (Seattle Times)
The battles over wind power (Seattle Times)
Massage parlor licenses yanked at Yakima (Yakima Herald Republic)
Look ahead to hospital consolidation (Yakima Herald Republic)

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The latest tv ad for Idaho gubernatorial candidate A.J. Balukoff.

 

Back in Print! Frank Church was one of the leading figures in Idaho history, and one of the most important U.S. senators of the last century. From wilderness to Vietnam to investigating the CIA, Church led on a host of difficult issues. This, the one serious biography of Church originally published in 1994, is back in print by Ridenbaugh Press.
Fighting the Odds: The Life of Senator Frank Church. LeRoy Ashby and Rod Gramer; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 800 pages. Softcover. $24.95.
See the FIGHTING THE ODDS page.


 
JOURNEY WEST

by Stephen Hartgen
The personal story of the well-known editor, publisher and state legislator's travel west from Maine to Idaho. A well-written account for anyone interested in Idaho, journalism or politics.
JOURNEY WEST: A memoir of journalism and politics, by Stephen Hartgen; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, here or at Amazon.com (softcover)

 

 

NEW EDITIONS is the story of the Northwest's 226 general-circulation newspapers and where your newspaper is headed.
New Editions: The Northwest's Newspapers as They Were, Are and Will Be. Steve Bagwell and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 324 pages. Softcover. (e-book ahead). $16.95.
See the NEW EDITIONS page.

How many copies?

 
THE OREGON POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

The Field Guide is the reference for the year on Oregon politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Compiled by a long-time Northwest political writer and a Salem Statesman-Journal political reporter.
OREGON POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Hannah Hoffman; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
THE IDAHO POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase is the reference for the year on Idaho Politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Written by two of Idaho's most veteran politcal observers.
IDAHO POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
without compromise
WITHOUT COMPROMISE is the story of the Idaho State Police, from barely-functioning motor vehicles and hardly-there roads to computer and biotechnology. Kelly Kast has spent years researching the history and interviewing scores of current and former state police, and has emerged with a detailed and engrossing story of Idaho.
WITHOUT COMPROMISE page.

 

Diamondfield
How many copies?
The Old West saw few murder trials more spectacular or misunderstood than of "Diamondfield" Jack Davis. After years of brushes with the noose, Davis was pardoned - though many continued to believe him guilty. Max Black has spent years researching the Diamondfield saga and found startling new evidence never before uncovered - including the weapon and one of the bullets involved in the crime, and important documents - and now sets out the definitive story. Here too is Black's story - how he found key elements, presumed lost forever, of a fabulous Old West story.
See the DIAMONDFIELD page for more.
 

Medimont Reflections Chris Carlson's Medimont Reflections is a followup on his biography of former Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus. This one expands the view, bringing in Carlson's take on Idaho politics, the Northwest energy planning council, environmental issues and much more. The Idaho Statesman: "a pull-back-the-curtain account of his 40 years as a player in public life in Idaho." Available here: $15.95 plus shipping.
See the Medimont Reflections page  
 
Idaho 100 NOW IN KINDLE
 
Idaho 100, about the 100 most influential people ever in Idaho, by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson is now available. This is the book about to become the talk of the state - who really made Idaho the way it is? NOW AN E-BOOK AVAILABLE THROUGH KINDLE for just $2.99. Or, only $15.95 plus shipping.
 

Idaho 100 by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson. Order the Kindle at Amazon.com. For the print edition, order here or at Amazon.


 

    Top-Story-graphic-300x200_topstory8
    Monday mornings on KLIX-AM

    watergates

    ORDER IT HERE or on Amazon.com

    More about this book by Randy Stapilus

    Water rights and water wars: They’re not just a western movie any more. The Water Gates reviews water supplies, uses and rights to use water in all 50 states.242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

    intermediary

    ORDER IT HERE or on Amazon.com

    More about this book by Lin Tull Cannell

    At a time when Americans were only exploring what are now western states, William Craig tried to broker peace between native Nez Perces and newcomers from the East. 15 years in the making, this is one of the most dramatic stories of early Northwest history. 242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

    Upstream

    ORDER HERE or Amazon.com

    The Snake River Basin Adjudication is one of the largest water adjudications the United States has ever seen, and it may be the most successful. Here's how it happened, from the pages of the SRBA Digest, for 16 years the independent source.

    Paradox Politics

    ORDER HERE or Amazon.com

    After 21 years, a 2nd edition. If you're interested in Idaho politics and never read the original, now's the time. If you've read the original, here's view from now.


    Governing Idaho:
    Politics, People and Power

    by James Weatherby
    and Randy Stapilus
    Caxton Press
    order here

    Outlaw Tales
    of Idaho

    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here

    It Happened in Idaho
    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here

    Camping Idaho
    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here