Archive for the 'First Take' Category

Sep 30 2014

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Once again, it’ll be pointed out that Boeing remains a massive business and employer around the Puget Sound. And it is. But it gets less and less so, and this latest run of 2,000 job cuts in the area (evidently, the jobs will be moved elsewhere) suggest the day may be coming when Boeing is no longer an especially outsized employer or economic force in the area. There are, after all, other large employers in the area which have been expanding, not contracting. The mix is changing.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Garden City farmers market sees modest traffic (Boise Statesman)
Nez Perce sales tax will expire (Lewiston Tribune)
Few specifics in Idaho governor ads (Moscow News)
Legislative candidate Jordan blasts school funding (Moscow News)
I-84 expansion would cost $120m (Nampa Press Tribune)
Subdivision land bought to farm usage (Nampa Press Tribune)
Another tort filed in juvenile corrections (Nampa Press Tribune)
Paul iPad project folding without state help (TF Times News)
Otter gets pro-life group support (TF Times News)

New OSU building opens for work (Corvallis Gazette)
Eugene may impose its own pot tax (Eugene Register Guard)
Gateway Mall may be remodeled, timing unclear (Eugene Register Guard)
Sheep killed by Umatilla wolf pack (KF Herald & News)
School year starts at Klamath college (KF Herald & News)
Salmon helped with more water releases (KF Herald & News)
Odor from pot gardens create issue (Medford Tribune)
Board to govern SOU named (Medford Tribune)
Treatment plant may be source of Rogue algae (Medford Tribune)
Wyde delivers talkk at Pendleton (Pendleton E Oregonian)
County building project done at Heppner (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Drone test flight launches at Pendleton (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Cop-beaten man wins $400k against Portland (Portland Oregonian)
Groups work on fixing overabundant cats (Salem Statesman Journal)
Congressional panel opposes wilderness rule (Salem Statesman Journal)

Doctors Clinic quits Bremerton (Bremerton Sun)
Hansville creosote project moves ahead (Bremerton Sun)
Two days before jail escape noticed (Everett Herald)
Local agencies on record disclosure pressures (Everett Herald)
Approval in holding off emptying leaking tank (Kennewick Herald)
Two more charter schools possible (Kennewick Herald)
Wrongful rape conviction payout, $500k (Longview News)
Boeing will cut 2,000 Puget jobs (Seattle Times, Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian, Longview News)
Law said to allow smoking pot in car (Port Angeles News)
King Council blocks further transit cuts (Seattle Times)
What tax funds will pay for parks? (Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic)
Benton will tour Cambodia (Vancouver Columbian)

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Sep 29 2014

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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The Oregon battle over GMO labeling is definitely on the tube, and news reports around the state took notice of that today. The ads are capably produced on both sides, and the results could be pretty close.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Boise considers downtown traffic patterns (Boise Statesman)
Idaho closes out moderate fire season (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
Reviewing Idaho potato market (TF Times News)

GMO initiative battle goes on air (Eugene Register Guard, Medford Tribune, Corvallis Gazette)
New water lines developed in Butte Falls (Medford Tribune)
New hires at UO education school (Eugene Register Guard)
On the new University of Portland president (Portland Oregonian)
Report finds no abuse at state hospital (Salem Statesman Journal)

Inslee panel would revive water, excise taxes (Everett Herald)
Stanfield looks at city hall update (Everett Herald)
Gorge plans and area residents conflict (Yakima Herald Republic, Kennewick Herald)
Gun ballot issue battle over ‘transfer’ (Olympian)
Issue: Constitutionality of new school taxes (Olympian)
Sequim may see new water rates (Port Angeles News)
Rare bumblebees expand in Olympic park (Port Angeles News)
Judge candidates battle on pay-or-appear (Port Angeles News)
Demand increases for Washington’s hops (Seattle Times)
Spokane sheriff positioned for re-election (Spokane Spokesman)
GOP relectant on new school taxes (Tacoma News Tribune)
Bull trout at Yakima deemed endangered (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 28 2014

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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The most striking story of the day (in the Medford Mail Tribune – it had run a little earlier in Portland) may have been about law enforcement in Josephine County, where volunteers (with some training by the county) are being sent out to evaluate crime scenes. The somewhat snarky headline referred to “CSI: Josephine County,” but it was deserved: Amateurs will be gathering fingerprints and fibers, and law enforcement will be praying it holds up in court. Good luck with that. This isn’t law enforcement’s preference, to be clear about it. This is a result of voters repeatedly turning down law enforcement levies needed to fund Josephine County enforcement at a level somewhat comparable to other counties. You can expect to see more explosive headlines coming from those quarters sooner or later.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

More Idaho students defaulting on loans (Boise Statesman, Lewiston Tribune)
Yellowstone may want more bucks from visitors (Boise Statesman, IF Post Register)
Profiling race for secretary of state (Boise Statesman)
Offenses behind Canyon Co jail inmates (Nampa Press Tribune)
Idaho Center grapples with finances (Nampa Press Tribune)
Reviewing marketing of Idaho potatoes (Lewiston Tribune)
Meals on Wheels money stalls (TF Times News)

Eugene cops using more body cameras (Eugene Register Guard)
Looking at sage grouse options (KF Herald & News)
Students struggle with loan repayment (Portland Oregonian)
New homeless program seeks student homelss (Medford Tribune)
Josephine Co sends volunteers to crime scenes (Medford Tribune)
Minor party gov candidates join in debates (Salem Statesman Journal)
Reviewing forest service photo policy (Salem Statesman Journal)

Measuring the amount of stream flow (Bremerton Sun)
Hospitals pull funds from Medicaid expansion (Vancouver Columbian, Bremerton Sun)
Woman’s death in jail raising questions (Everett Herald)
New Lower Columbia College building get praise (Longview News)
Kaiser medical clinic opens to non-members (Longview News)
Dealing with Olympia’s downtown homeless (Olympian)
Olympic narc unit hit with $20m lawsuit (Port Angeles News)
Concerns about Navy electromagnetic project (Port Angeles News)
Rents skyrocketing Seattle (Seattle Times)
Spokane overview – parks issue (Spokane Spokesman)
Latinos see political issue in names (Spokane Spokesman)
Developing Tacoma’s Amtrak station (Tacoma News Tribune)
Initiative on guns, and the word ‘transfer’ (Tacoma News Tribune)
Police increasingly wearing cameras (Tacoma News Tribune)
Yakima works on wastewater flow (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 27 2014

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Kathryn Yost, legislative staffer, dies (Idaho Statesman)
IF okays Hitt Road plan; Ammon next (IF Post Register)
Caldwell firefighters see pay raise (Nampa Press Tribune)
Vigils for Idaho pastor held in Iran (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
Reviewing Mitchell Senate campaign (TF Times News)

Fires not quite gone from Oregon (Corvallis Gazette)
More mandatory drug tests for athletes (Eugene Register Guard)
Lane County may try new vehicle fees (Eugene Register Guard)
First televised governor’s debate at Sunriver (Eugene Register Guard, KF Herald & News)
KF police chief plans retirement (KF Herald & News)
State Senate 4 race turns negative (Medford Tribune)
Britt Classical Festival draws strong numbers (Medford Tribune)
Reviewing CCO in Umatilla Co (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Walden forests bill passes House again (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Plan for new Irrigon library stalled (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Reviewing race in 5th CD (Portland Oregonian)
Oregon fishermen pulling in PCBs (Portland Oregonian)
PERS costs for schools will drop (Salem Statesman Journal)
ODOT placing median barriers (Salem Statesman Journal)

Concern about mudslide in East Bremerton (Bremerton Sun)
Snohomish medical examiner quits (Everett Herald)
Major power line vandalized (Everett Herald)
Many south sound school enrollments increase (Olympian)
Tacoma schools concerned about new charters (Tacoma News Tribune)
Oil transporters opposing further regs (Vancouver Columbian)

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Sep 26 2014

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Was it a backing off or a miscommunication? The forest service chief says there was never an intent to require permits of news or recreational photographers shooting pictures in the wilderness, that the permits were aimed more at large movie productions and the like. Which doesn’t square with local rangers requiring permits of news photographers. The followup news stories were continuing on today; still more followup will be needed.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Nampa-Caldwell I-84 work cancelled (Boise Statesman)
INL projects helps with disaster preparedness (IF Post Register)
New strategic plan on Idaho juvenile justice (IF Post Register)
Otter visits UI, talks college savings (Moscow News)
WA state auditor reviews Whitman issues (Moscow News)
Forest Service says photo plan misunderstood (Lewiston Tribune)
Jones/Ybarra debate at Caldwell (Nampa Press Tribune)
Democrats seeking out younger voters (TF Times News)
More steps toward canyon jump attempt (TF Times News)

New OSU students arrive (Corvallis Gazette)
Tracktown USA pursues global event (Eugene Register Guard)
Wilderness photo permits debated (Portland Oregonian, Salem Statesman Journal, KF Herald & News)
Interior Secretary Jewell visits on grouse (KF Herald & News)
Richardson fined over campaign reporting (Medford Tribune)
Many responses to survey on Ashland ski area (Medford Tribune)
Grant law enforcement looks for truants (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Reviewing 3rd House district race (Portland Oregonian)

Bremerton naval hospital redefing itself (Bremerton Sun)
Delayed Mariott hotel building launched (Everett Herald)
More beds designated for mental health (Everett Herald)
Many retirements in Olympia police this year (Olympian)
Wilderness photo permits debated (Seattle Times, Olympian)
Navy war games planned on Olympic peniunsula (Port Angeles News)
Couple on air for 118 years signs off (Port Angeles News)
Less uncompensated care at Harborview hospital (Seattle Times)
Secret meetings by port panel (Tacoma News Tribune)
New trail maps Tacoma rail tradition (Tacoma News Tribune)
Reviewing 3rd CD contest (Vancouver Columbian)
Oil industry reviewing train testing plans (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima residents may face power rate increase (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 25 2014

On the front pages

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On the list of clearly and obviously idiotic governmental regulations, the planned (actually, long-standing interim rule which may be made permanent) rule on wilderness photography must have a place of honor. Regulation of activity in wilderness areas start from a rational premise, that man should visit but not stay and that his footprint should be as light as possible. And you can see the argument if someone (news organizations included) want to bring in equipment larger than a photographer can carry on his person. Short of that, how does the photo rule (as reported on by a string of Northwest papers today), which may require $1,500 permits even of ordinary visitors to the lands and allows government employees to decide which news stories merit wilderness photography and which don’t, serve to protect the condition of wilderness areas? It could undermine them instead if it infuriates people about the idea of designating lands as wilderness (hello, Boulder-White Clouds).

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Forest Service plans wilderness photo rules (Boise Statesman, Lewiston Tribune)
Judge Lodge takes senior status (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
First gubernatorial date held, minus otter (IF Post Register, TF Times News)
Capital for a day meets Lenore (Lewiston Tribune)
Pedestrian mall maybe for downtown Lewiston (Lewiston Tribune)
Questions arising about Lochsa land deal (Moscow News)
C of I adds to faculty, for more students (Nampa Press Tribune)
Clothes store wants to build at canyon rim (TF Times News)

New connector trail west of Corvallis set (Corvallis Gazette)
Family working on pot dispensary business (Corvallis Gazette)
Demolition of old city hall approved (Eugene Register Guard)
Klamath county working on air quality (KF Herald & News)
Gold Hill may set 25% pot tax (Medford Tribune)
Forest Service plans wilderness photo rules (Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Tribune)
Pendleton library considers new services (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Potatoes have above average season (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Stanfield may get low-income housing (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Reviewing 2nd District U.S. House race (Portland Oregonian)
Fires break records in 2014 in Oregon (Portland Oregonian)

Harrison medical sets plans for Silverdale (Bremerton Sun)
Ferries gather input from riders (Bremerton Sun)
Glacier Peak to be watched closer for eruptions (Everett Herald)
Group formed on Everett homelessness (Everett Herald)
4th district candidates talk up Hanford (Yakima Herald Republic, Kennewick Herald)
Group urges pot laws tightened on in-car use (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Big tidal wetland created near Cathlamet (Longview News)
Flat water fee considered in Port Angeles (Port Angeles News)
Clallam auditor race reviewed (Port Angeles News)
Seattle cops test body cameras (Seattle Times)
Halfway mark reached in light rail extension (Seattle Times)
Avista moving some big gas lines (Spokane Spokesman)
Selah considers ‘all inclusive’ park (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 24 2014

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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The Tuesday Twin Falls debate was the last chance for Idaho Superintendent of Public Instruction candidate Sherry Ybarra to turn things around for her struggling campaign, and the debate may have helped. She presented herself as the experienced education professional she is, and her connection to the school-level education picture – her opponent, Jana Jones, has spent a lot of time in recent years in state-level education work – may have come across as appealing to a number of voters. Did it do enough to turn things around?

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

CCDC planning condo project in Boise (Boise Statesman)
Boise Hawks seeking a new stadium (Boise Statesman)
Battle over Boise bike lanes coming to head (Boise Statesman)
Fewer people lacking health insurance now (IF Post Register)
Superintendent prospects Jones, Ybarra debate (IF Post Register, TF Times News)
Congressional concern on Lochsa land exchange (Lewiston Tribune)
Canyon Co food co-op may open in January (Nampa Press Tribune)
Melba schools may try bond election (Nampa Press Tribune)
SWAT dispute between Bannock Co, Fort Hall (Pocatello Journal)

OSU commbatting sex assaults (Corvallis Gazette)
Heavy rain in western Oregon (Corvallis Gazette)
KF Community Lounge will stay open (KF Herald & News)
Medford still working on pot tax measure (Medford Tribune)
New Hermiston manager points to water need (Pandleton E Oregonian)
Profiling 4th district House race (Portland Oregonian)
Using DNA technology for pot strains (Portland Oregonian)
Federal rule would limit photography in wilderness (Salem Statesman Journal)

Ferry sysrem waiting for new director (Bremerton Sun)
More discussion ahead about oil trains (Everett Herald)
Unemployment up in South Sound (Olympian)
Kilmer proposes bill on mining asteroids (Port Angeles News)
Clallam county still delays on pot decision (Port Angeles News)
Tharinger visits Clallam on various issues (Port Angeles News)
Streetcar line for First Hill gets ready (Seattle Times)
Amazon.com and the gender pay gap (Seattle Times)
Spokane might measure sewage pot traces (Spokane Spokesman)
Tacoma council backs gun background checks (Tacoma News Tribune)
Developer lines out plans for Chambers Bay (Tacoma News Tribune)
Lewis-McChord may close medical command (Tacoma News Tribune)
Considering budget cuts to colleges (Vancouver Columbian)
Teachers blast Yakima special ed approach (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 23 2014

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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The biggest Northwest story of the day was environmental: A finding in one study that wind patterns, more than human activity specifically, in large part may have been causing the warmer than normal winters in the Pacific Northwest (and may again this year). The story is likely to be misread as a shot against global climate warming, but the academics who worked on it were specific that it was not, that the phenomenon they reviewed was a specific regional development, not global, and just one factor among many.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Middleton ends contract with sheriffs office (Boise Statesman)
Bison from Yellowston may be spread around (Boise Statesman)
Asotin sheriff’s race turning bitter on ad (Lewiston Tribune)
Warm weather expected in region this fall (Lewiston Tribune)
Profiling new Schweitzer engineereing CEO (Moscow News)
Moscow considers beer, wine at farmers market (Moscow News)
Idaho health exchange will have 261 plans (Nampa Press Tribune)
Property tax homeowner exemption will rise (Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News)
Are Idaho drivers rudest nationwide? (Pocatello Journal)

Strong job growth noted in Benton (Corvallis Gazette)
Two school board slots filled at Corvallis (Corvallis Gazette)
Batch of OSU parking permits sell out fast (Corvallis Gazette)
Aaron Jones, Eugene lumber exec, dies (Eugene Register Guard)
City hall demolition creeping ahead (Eugene Register Guard)
KF council reviews pot revenue potential (KF Herald & News)
Debate over Cave Junction anti-bullying (Medford Tribune)
Medford looks at viaduct improvements (Medford Tribune)
Drone test range gets final OK (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Editorial boards host governor debate (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Pacific temps linked to wind patterns? (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Josephine sheriff seeks civilian help (Portland Oregonian)
Profiling race in OR 1st congressional (Portland Oregonian)
Salem holds off pot rule decision (Salem Statesman Journal)

Report says stalled ferry wasn’t overloaded (Seattle Times, Bremerton Sun)
New rules possible for gun ranges (Bremerton Sun)
Legislators urge shakeup in ferry (Everett Herald)
BNSF Railroad limiting access to beach trail (Everett Herald)
Richland starts building 4th fire station (Kennewick Herald)
Thurston community TV upgrades equipment (Olympian)
Simpson lumber company may sell (Olympian)
Moving toward finish on biomass plant build (Port Angeles News)
Study: Pacific coast may be warmer due to winds (Seattle Times, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Olympian)
Warnings of 15% cut in state college funds (Seattle Times)
Major drop in teen pregnancy at Spokane (Spokane Spokesman)
Wednesday quake may have hit Seattle Fault (Tacoma News Tribune)
Pinchot Forest HQ moves to Army barracks in 16 (Vancouver Columbian)

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Sep 22 2014

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

More people show at Nez Perce Co fair (Lewiston Tribune)
Record grain harvest in northern Idaho (Lewiston Tribune)
Moscow-Pullman climate-awareness march held (Moscow News)
ID minimum wage half of living wage (Moscow News)
BioLife Plasma plans Nampa opening (Nampa Press Tribune)
COMPASS looks at I-84 plans (Nampa Press Tribune)

Efforts to bring back monarch butterflies (Medford Tribune)
Renaming a bridge for Al Densmore (Medford Tribune)
Containing the Scoggins Creek fire (Portland Oregonian)

Green Mountain Mining hours expand (Everett Herald)
Voting post card goes out to voters (Everett Herald)
Longview had a hot summer (Longview News)
Charity costs at hospitals declining (Olympian)
Tacoma considers how to keep text messages (Tacoma News Tribune)
Oregon considers response to pot initiative (Vancouver Columbian)
Reviewing House race in District 17 (Vancouver Columbian)

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Sep 21 2014

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The transfer of Spokane’s Catholic bishop, Blase Cupich, to become archbishop at the country’s third-largest archdiocese at Chicago, got some coverage in Sunday’s papers but not as prominently as might have been expected. (There was some Saturday as well.) Cupich was often described as, in the context of higher-level church leaders, a middle-roader, generally sticking to official Vatican policy but urging a low-key and calm approach to those who disagree. That could be an indicator of where the church’s leadership may be headed at the moment.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Reviewing Spokane archbishop move to Chicago (Boise Statesman)
High tech startup companies in Boise (IF Post Register)
Lawmakers comment on Luna budget plan (Nampa Press Tribune)
Nampa tries to grow a night life (Nampa Press Tribune)
Muslims prepare to open Pocatello mosque (Pocatello Journal)
Were other cities invoiced for roads by Pocatello? (Pocatello Journal)
20/20 Produce signs major contract (TF Times News)

One more vote to city hall decision (Eugene Register Guard)
Possible biofuels plant for Lakeview (KF Herald & News)
Profiling governor candidate Richardson (Medford Tribune)
Reviewing congressional races in Oregon (Portland Oregonian)
Investigating a whistleblower’s tale (Salem Statesman Journal)
Salem considers pot shop rules (Salem Statesman Journal)

Jefferson jail makes med mistakes (Bremerton Sun)
Boeing speeding up to meet 787 demand (Everett Herald)
Longview sued over tap water quality (Longview News)
Concerns about spraying in Willapa Bay (Longview News)
WA considers app for remote doctor’s visit (Longview News)
Shoe seller leaving downtown Olympia (Olympian)
Port Angeles utility rates may rise (Port Angeles News)
Debate over language in gun initiative (Seattle Times)
Reviewing ID superintent schools race (Spokane Spokesman)
Tacoma art museum sees expansion plan (Tacoma News Tribune)
Hospitals seeing less charity care (Tacoma News Tribune)
Reviewing ways to deal with problem cops (Vancouver Columbian)
Wenatchee tries downtown public market (Yakima Herald Republic)
Reviewing archbishop move Spokane to Chicago (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 20 2014

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Enterovirus has become a substantial halth issue around the Northwest, and it was the biggest news story in Washington today. (There have been major headlines this week about instances in Oregon and Idaho too.) It isn’t new. Wikipedia notes that “Enteroviruses affect millions of people worldwide each year, and are often found in the respiratory secretions (e.g., saliva, sputum, or nasal mucus) and stool of an infected person. Historically, poliomyelitis was the most significant disease caused by an enterovirus, poliovirus.” We may be seeing more specificity in future reports, since the term “enterovirus” covers a lot of territory.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Redfish Lake fish numbers rising (Boise Statesman, IF Post Register)
Several treasurer’s issues cleared (Boise Statesman)
St Joe’s hospital may sever from parent (Lewiston Tribune)
Silver says treasurer questions remain (Moscow News)
Old UI Pike House will be demolished (Moscow News)
Audit finds treasurer problems corrected (Nampa Press Tribune)
More discussion about tiered teacher licenses (Nampa Press Tribune)
Canyon Co land use lawsuit dismissed (Nampa Press Tribune)
Idaho income still behind rest of nation (Pocatello Journal)
Democrats encouraging Latino voting (TF Times News)

UO gets $10 million donation for structure (Eugene Register Guard)
Eugene cops sting many sex predators (Eugene Register Guard)
State and Klamath battling over water rules (KF Herald & News)
Pot shop dealer on probation (Medford Tribune)
PGG ends retail business, searches for buyer (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Gas prices may be dropping (Portland Oregonian)
NE Portland pot dispensary location opposed (Portland Oregonian)
Scammers hitting mid-valley area hard (Salem Statesman Journal)

Restoration of some Sound waterways (Bremerton Sun)
Kitsap Co begins its budget discussions (Bremerton Sun)
Findings of enterovirus in Washington (Seattle Times, Everett Herald, Vancouver Columbian)
Gas prices may fall in the fall (Longview News)
Asphalt plant operations draw objections (Olympians)
Congressional delegation supports military action (Olympian)
Seattle gets new transportation director (Seattle Times)
Nordstrom launches first store in Canada (Seattle Times)
Spokane Catholic archbishop moves to Chicago (Spokane Spokesman)

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Sep 19 2014

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

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All the talk for so many months now about a bum health insurance website and who did and didn’t live up to contracts really has missed the point. The big Oregon story today (following on an OHSU study) does highlight the important development in the changes in Oregon’s health insurance picture over the last year, since Obamacare has kicked in: The number of uninsured people in the state has fallen, from about 550,000 to 202,000 – by 63%. The state estimated that 95% of Oregonians now have health insurance coverage. That’s still not perfect, and the system still has some bugs crawling around. But getting about 350,000 more people insured in the course of a few months is a massive achievement, a big success story, and a much bigger deal than whether a few hyperlinks work right on a web site.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

High occupancy in downtown Boise hotels (Boise Statesman)
Caldwell pays for study for future (Boise Statesman)
Washington state revenues shoot up (Lewiston Tribune)
New medical research clinic opens at Nampa (Nampa Press Tribune)
Stallings blasts Simpson on rural mail (TF Times News)
Hagerman faces sewer bond election (TF Times News)

Springfield mulls pot sales tax (Eugene Register Guard)
Task force has sexual assault ideas for UO (Eugene Register Guard)
New peaks for health coverage (Portland Oregonian, Salem Statesman Journal, KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Completion of water project on Sprague River (KF Herald & News)
New One West Main building in Medford opens (Medford Tribune)
Medford may foreclosure on abandoned houses (Medford Tribune)
Medford may allow alcohol into city park (Medford Tribune)
Washington Co traffic turning nightmarish (Portland Oregonian)
New West Salem boundaries set (Salem Statesman Journal)

Pot tax revenues projected at $636m (Vancouver Columbian, Bremerton Sun, Olympian)
Reviewing Supreme Court decision on schools (Bremerton Sun)
Oso area highway back to full speed soon (Everett Herald)
Shelter may provide only food, fewer beds (Longview News)
Longview city manager Bob Gregory retires (Longview News)
State employee union works on new pay level (Olympian)
Seqium employee union ballot issue in court (Port Angeles News)
Tunnel work continues as Bertha sits still (Seattle Times)
Spokane diocese sues its own lawyers (Spokane Spokesman)
New earthquake detection system developed (Tacoma News Tribune)
Land developer, Vancouver port go at it (Vancouver Columbian)
Inactive Pot shops may lose place on list (Vancouver Columbian)
Moxee nutrient plans fined (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 18 2014

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Published by under First Take

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Big Oregon news was something relatively routine and simply tracking with existing state law: An increase in the state minimum wage, to $9.25 an hour. Oregon continues behind Washington as having the second-highest minimum wage in the country. Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian supported the increase, but it essentially followed the guidelines set up in state law, requiring that increases occur alongside inflationary costs of living.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Cool wet weather may affect potato crop (IF Post Register)
Wildfires roar near highway 12 (Lewiston Tribune)
Few attend guns on campus meeting (Lewiston Tribune, Moscow News)
Will Idaho gay marriage law hit Surpeme Court? (Moscow News)
Middleton launches it own police (Nampa Press Tribune)
Nampa may create food co-op (Nampa Press Tribune)
School supplemental levies common in Idaho (Nampa Press Tribune)
Simpson, Labrador oppose Obama arms plan (TF Times News)
Idaho minimum wage half of living wage (TF Times News)

Natural Grocers opens store at Eugene (Eugene Register Guard)
Avakian wants Oregon minimum wage raise (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Eugene reconsiders YMCA land deal (Eugene Register Guard)
OIT trustees officially installed (KF Herald & News)
Smoke from wildfires may stay in air (Medford Tribune)
Does Umatilla adult moratorium violate constitution? (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Lewis & Clark legal clinic closing (Portland Oregonian)
Legislature works on college affordability (Salem Statesman Journal)
State home aid program funding set (Salem Statesman Journal)

Reid, last big Kitsap indie realtor, bought (Bremerton Sun)
Ferry offload gets left turn lane (Bremerton Sun)
Kennewick won’t launch Christian prayer (Kennewick Herald)
Massive Kelso pot organization outlined (Longview News)
Thurston jail negotiation end may be near (Olympian)
Massive Navy scan of private data, conviction tossed (Seattle Times)
Still slow going for marijuana stores (Seattle Times)
It’s no longer a SWAT team in Spokane (Spokane Spokesman)
Kokanee fishing running strong (Spokane Spokesman)
Report: 10% online gun sales to ineligibles (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Clark County trailing in economic renewal (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima wine harvest breaks new record (Yakima Herald Republic)
Pacific Power seeks 9.5% residential raise (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 17 2014

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

The blitz fire at Weed in California was a major news story around the Northwest, not only in the newspapers around southwest Oregon (the communities around Medford are only about an hour away, and quickly sent a good deal of help southward) but also further away. The super-hot and super-fast blaze wiping out about 100 buildings hit close to home in a northwest that has seen its share of wildfires this summer, including a number edging uncomfortably close to communities. And isn’t done with its wildfires yet.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

PERSI recipients getting a pay bump (Boise Statesman)
Boise city, Community House end lawsuit (Boise Statesman)
Ybarra campaign struggling (IF Post Register)
IF council starts strategic planning (IF Post Register)
Schweitzer Laboratories, Pullman, has new CEO (Lewiston Tribune)
Big board changes on board of St. Joe’s (Lewiston Tribune)
Labrador bill hit police militarization (Nampa Press Tribune)
Bear Lake dress code under dispute (Pocatello Journal)
Ketchum city urges easing back on wolves (TF Times News)
Magic Valley 911 dispatch has high turnover (TF Times News)

Eugene sets heat record this summer (Eugene Register Guard)
Battle over sick leave may go statewide (Eugene Register Guard)
Salmon at Klamath face die-off (KF Herald & News)
Weed wildfire wipes out town (Medford Tribune)
Campaign to register voters launched (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Umatilla set adult business moratorium (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Oracle tries to move case to federal court (Portland Oregonian)
Efforts increase to contain Estacada fire (Portland Oregonian)
Estimate: third of area homeless mentally ill (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bremerton considers restoring ML King road (Bremerton Sun)
Salaries go up for Kitsap Transit (Bremerton Sun)
Big pot operation at Kelso busted (Longview News)
Cowlitz County will watch coal dust from trains (Longview News)
Retail pot in WA beginning to prosper (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Thurston County may see budget freeze (Olympian)
Move of Enchanted Chalet completed (Port Angeles News)
Seattle considers building tax for affordables (Seattle Times)
New railroad bridge sought at Sandpoint (Spokane Spokesman)
A co-UW/WSU med school partnership? (Spokane Spokesman)
Clark County makes new fireworks zones (Vancouver Columbian)
Cantwell blasts ‘Redskins’ name (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima’s council backs election by district (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Sep 16 2014

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Top Washington story is the growing (emerging) battle between the University of Washington and Washington State University over WSU’s proposal to establish its own medical school.

The idea has an extravagant ring to it but the bigger-picture justification could be there. UW’s well-regarded school is hemmed in for growth, limited in its expansion options at a time when projections suggest a need for greater numbers of physicians around the Northwest. The niche would be a med school aimed more strictly at training physicians, leaving most of the advanced research (for which UW is well known) at Seattle. The training element need is becoming clearer with time. Idaho State University leaders have discussed the idea of a med school there, and although that project may be a heavy lift for the smaller institution and state, it reflects real needs and pressures. The WSU project may have enough force to carry it at least to early stages of development.

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Radar may help avoid elk crashes on 75 (Boise Statesman)
NW Boise annexation battle ahead (Boise Statesman)
Lewiston considers possible park ideas (Lewiston Tribune)
State panel considers teacher pay levels (Lewiston Tribune)
Latah gets an armored vehicle from Bonner (Moscow News)
40 places in Pullman may be historic-designated (Moscow News)
Carl’s Jr gets contentious parking variance (Nampa Press Tribune)
Reviewing high school-college dual credit (Nampa Press Tribune)
Balukoff staff pay arrangement found legal (TF Times News)
Reviewing TF’s dangerous intersections (TF Times News)

Eugene schools ask for levy support (Eugene Register Guard)
Onion fire near Grants Pass grows (Medford Tribune)
Corps ends review of coal terminal (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Estacada fire yield lots of smoke (Portland Oregonian)
Cover Oregon error smaller than expected (Portland Oregonian)
Hillcrest younth prison may shut down (Salem Statesman Journal)
Food companies against anti-GMO measure (Salem Statesman Journal)

Overtime for firefighters hits budget (Bremerton Sun)
Grant brings more dental service to Kitsap (Bremerton Sun)
UW blasts plan for WSU med school (Spokane Spokesman, Kennewick Herald)
Small towns worry about more train traffic (Longview News)
Smoke covers NW Oregon (Vancouver Columbian, Longview News)
WA state revenues continue rising (Yakima Herald Republic, Olympian)
Thurston Energy gives conservation rebates (Olympian)
Amazon plans $1 data center in Ohio (Seattle Times)
On a push to build casinpo in Bremerton (Seattle Times)
Twisp area rebuilds progressing (Spokane Spokesman)
Concerns about lowering Lake Pend Oreille (Spokane Spokesman)
Vancouver looks at new fire station sites (Vancouver Columbian)
Clark Co fair audit yields mixed report (Vancouver Columbian)

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The latest tv ad for Idaho gubernatorial candidate A.J. Balukoff.

 

Back in Print! Frank Church was one of the leading figures in Idaho history, and one of the most important U.S. senators of the last century. From wilderness to Vietnam to investigating the CIA, Church led on a host of difficult issues. This, the one serious biography of Church originally published in 1994, is back in print by Ridenbaugh Press.
Fighting the Odds: The Life of Senator Frank Church. LeRoy Ashby and Rod Gramer; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 800 pages. Softcover. $24.95.
See the FIGHTING THE ODDS page.


 
JOURNEY WEST

by Stephen Hartgen
The personal story of the well-known editor, publisher and state legislator's travel west from Maine to Idaho. A well-written account for anyone interested in Idaho, journalism or politics.
JOURNEY WEST: A memoir of journalism and politics, by Stephen Hartgen; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, here or at Amazon.com (softcover)

 

 

NEW EDITIONS is the story of the Northwest's 226 general-circulation newspapers and where your newspaper is headed.
New Editions: The Northwest's Newspapers as They Were, Are and Will Be. Steve Bagwell and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 324 pages. Softcover. (e-book ahead). $16.95.
See the NEW EDITIONS page.

How many copies?

 
THE OREGON POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

The Field Guide is the reference for the year on Oregon politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Compiled by a long-time Northwest political writer and a Salem Statesman-Journal political reporter.
OREGON POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Hannah Hoffman; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
THE IDAHO POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase is the reference for the year on Idaho Politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Written by two of Idaho's most veteran politcal observers.
IDAHO POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
without compromise
WITHOUT COMPROMISE is the story of the Idaho State Police, from barely-functioning motor vehicles and hardly-there roads to computer and biotechnology. Kelly Kast has spent years researching the history and interviewing scores of current and former state police, and has emerged with a detailed and engrossing story of Idaho.
WITHOUT COMPROMISE page.

 

Diamondfield
How many copies?
The Old West saw few murder trials more spectacular or misunderstood than of "Diamondfield" Jack Davis. After years of brushes with the noose, Davis was pardoned - though many continued to believe him guilty. Max Black has spent years researching the Diamondfield saga and found startling new evidence never before uncovered - including the weapon and one of the bullets involved in the crime, and important documents - and now sets out the definitive story. Here too is Black's story - how he found key elements, presumed lost forever, of a fabulous Old West story.
See the DIAMONDFIELD page for more.
 

Medimont Reflections Chris Carlson's Medimont Reflections is a followup on his biography of former Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus. This one expands the view, bringing in Carlson's take on Idaho politics, the Northwest energy planning council, environmental issues and much more. The Idaho Statesman: "a pull-back-the-curtain account of his 40 years as a player in public life in Idaho." Available here: $15.95 plus shipping.
See the Medimont Reflections page  
 
Idaho 100 NOW IN KINDLE
 
Idaho 100, about the 100 most influential people ever in Idaho, by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson is now available. This is the book about to become the talk of the state - who really made Idaho the way it is? NOW AN E-BOOK AVAILABLE THROUGH KINDLE for just $2.99. Or, only $15.95 plus shipping.
 

Idaho 100 by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson. Order the Kindle at Amazon.com. For the print edition, order here or at Amazon.


 

    Top-Story-graphic-300x200_topstory8
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    ORDER IT HERE or on Amazon.com

    More about this book by Randy Stapilus

    Water rights and water wars: They’re not just a western movie any more. The Water Gates reviews water supplies, uses and rights to use water in all 50 states.242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

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    ORDER IT HERE or on Amazon.com

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    ORDER HERE or Amazon.com

    The Snake River Basin Adjudication is one of the largest water adjudications the United States has ever seen, and it may be the most successful. Here's how it happened, from the pages of the SRBA Digest, for 16 years the independent source.

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    ORDER HERE or Amazon.com

    After 21 years, a 2nd edition. If you're interested in Idaho politics and never read the original, now's the time. If you've read the original, here's view from now.


    Governing Idaho:
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    order here

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