Archive for the 'First Take' Category

Apr 01 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

BLM heavily repairing fire-ravaged lands in west (Boise Statesman)
Supreme Court backs Idaho Medicaid reinbursement (Boise Statesman)
Legislature passes civics test bill (IF Post Register, Nampa Press Tribune)
House road tax bill dies in Senate (Nampa Press Tribune)
Tribes protesting cleanup by FMC when windy (Pocatello Journal)

IT project in state called understaffed (Astorian)
State school budget clears House (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Pendleton E Oregonian)
UO hires anti-assault officer (Eugene Register Guard)
National Guard units come home to KF (KF Herald & News)
Klamath Co’s shortfall estimated at $2.4m (KF Herald & News)
Medford considers in-city historic district (Medford Tribune)
Tuition increased at SOU in Ashland (Medford Tribune)
AG files suit on subscription deal at White City (Medford Tribune)
Some electronic devices of Kitzhaber staff held (Portland Oregonian)
Planning for statehouse gun hearing (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bellingham port gives OK to developer (Bellingham Herald)
Ferndale considers rules for park district (Bellingham Herald)
State GOP includes no new taxes in budget (Spokane Spokesman, Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Bellingham Herald, Olympian)
Kitsap 911 first in WA to accept texts (Bremerton Sun)
Legislators now have conflicting budgets (Everett Herald)
Workers voting on KapStone dispute (Longview News)
Many vaccinations over measles (Seattle Times)
Seattle minimum wage law effective today (Seattle Times)
Tacoma’s Clock broadband may be leased privately (Tacoma News Tribune)

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Mar 31 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Concern over British Columbian fish trends (Lewiston Tribune)
Tax measure clears Idaho house (Nampa Press Tribune, Lewiston Tribune)
Syringa owner files Chapter 13 bankruptcy (Moscow News)
Agidius accused of spying on former opponent (Moscow News)
Eminent domain law could limit some local growth (Nampa Press Tribune)
Interim Pocatello school superintendent named (Pocatello Journal)
Monitors say tribal radioactivity not high (Pocatello Journal)

Annual economic forecast outlines trends (Eugene Register Guard)
State might ban bee-related insecticide (Eugene Register Guard)
New KF police chief takes over (KF Herald & News)
Bly terrorist camp case draws another ‘guilty’ (KF Herald & News)
KF Sportsmans Warehouse to open soon (KF Herald & News)
Republicans mostly sidelined at legislature (Medford Tribune)
Umatilla Co ranks low in health index (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Rethinking Milton-Freewater’s downtown (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Little support for light on legislators records (Portland Oregonian)
Looking for an elder-crime prosecutor (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bellingham waterfront rebuild decision arrives (Bellingham Herald)
Kitsap sewer rates rise more gently (Bremerton Sun)
Auditor Kelley inquest linked to 2008 fire (Everett Herald)
New Snohomish ombudsman hired (Everett Herald)
Seattle apartment rents keep rising (Seattle Times)
Spokane planning major biking routes (Spokane Spokesman)
Teachers arrive at Olympia on ‘no child’ rule (Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian)
Boating marina was once a toxic site (Tacoma News Tribune)
Local debate weighs in on minimum wage (Vancouver Columbian)

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Mar 30 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Major Treefort music event underway (Boise Statesman)
Longtimme humane society leader Dee Fugit retires (Boise Statesman)
Debates over who should pay for mental health (Lewiston Tribune)
Washington considers mental health service cost (Lewiston Tribune)
Caldwell auction house sold (Nampa Press Tribune)

Oregon ACLU director Dave Fidanqur retires (Eugene Register Guard)
In-n-Out, launched in Medford, may open more in OR (Medford Tribune)
Portland Mayor Hales will seek re-election (Portland Oregonian)
Reviewing state gun control plan (Salem Statesman Journal)
Help with the higher education costs (Salem Statesman Journal)

Massive storage facility being built at Lynden (Bellingham Herald)
Razor clamming season begins (Bremerton Sun)
Safety an issue at Everett transit station (Everett Herald)
State could ban powdered alcohol (Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian, Olympian, Longview News)
State schools budget examined (Port Angeles News)
Growing numbers of applications at WA universities (Seattle Times)
Fort Vancouver West Barracks may be remade (Vancouver Columbian)

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Mar 29 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Reviewing year-old Army national guard crash (Boise Statesman)
Legislature nearing its conclusion (IF Post Register)
Reviewing the Church Committee on the CIA (IF Post Register)
Little help in region on mental illness (Lewiston Tribune)
Tribes contend radioactivity is in the wind (Pocatello Journal)

Oregon snowpack diminishes greatly (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard)
Some of Oregon’s small towns grow strongly (Eugene Register Guard)
Walden town hall features water deal (KF Herald & News)
More truckers using Highway 97 (KF Herald & News)
Conservation group looks to buy 352-acre ranch (Medford Tribune)
Prices rise high for many key drugs (Salem Statesman Journal)

Condition of Whatcom jail blasted (Bellingham Herald)
Who benefits from political spending? (Bremerton Sun)
Bremerton annexation may run afoul of state law (Bremerton Sun)
Legislators may toughen rules on oil trains (Everett Herald)
College may drop many student health policies (Kennewick Herald, Olympian)
Longview Port running into land limits (Longview News)
Democrats plan deal on class-size initiative (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
British firm buys Port Angeles composites make (Port Angeles News)
What’s the effect of sea lions on salmon? (Seattle Times, Yakima Herald Republic)
Companies with tax breaks still paying low (Seattle Times)

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Mar 28 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Meridian tries to plan substantial downtown (Boise Statesman)
Legislature approves $1.8b for schools (Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune, Moscow News)
ER schedules at Pomeroy cut (Lewiston Tribune)
House passes fed lands control bill (IF Post Register, TF Times News)
Another run at Craters of the Moon park status (IF Post Register)
Analysis: Tax plan would help wealthiest most (Nampa Press Tribune)
Feds announce Oregon sage grouse deal (Nampa Press Tribune)
House may vote next week on road tax (TF Times News)

Gearhart mayor not recalled (Astorian)
State data hacked, Brown seeks review (Astorian)
Amanda Knox case ends in Italy (Eugene Register Guard)
State pot director fired (Portland Oregonian, Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Tribune)
Legislators meet with locals on state issues (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Sage grouse deal reached by ranchers, feds (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Possible tradeoff over road repair, software (Salem Statesman Journal)

WA Democrats may try for capital gains tax (Tacoma News Tribune, Everett Herald, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Bellingham Herald, Longview News)
Marysville school may seek $5 for cafeteria (Everett Herald)
KapStone deal still hands on health plan (Longview News)
Possible prison for mentally ill (Olympian)
Olympia will add officers to night patrol (Olympian)
Amanda Knox case ends in Italy (Seattle Times, Tacoma News Tribunne, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Longview News)
WSU medical school plan still moving (Spokane Spokesman)
Tacomans sue to stop new government building (Tacoma News Tribune)
Inslee considers interchange for Mill Plain (Vancouver Columbian)
Union possible for Yakima clerks office (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Mar 27 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Idaho luring international food processing (Boise Statesman)
Legislature repeals allowance of instant racing (Boise Statesman, IF Post Register, Nampa Press Tribune)
State gets bad ethics report (IF Post Register)
State Senate approved teacher pay raise (TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune)
Looking further at Bergdahl case (Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune)
Fewer accidents on Moscow-Pullman road (Moscow News)
A couple of highway bills clear committee (Nampa Press Tribune)

Warrenton dam to be knocked out (Astorian)
New gun background check bill surfaces at Salem (Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Debate ensues over whether UO worker was fired (Eugene Register Guard)
Klamath still pursuing local air service (KF Herald & News)
New area Bureau of Reclamation manager sought (KF Herald & News)
Budget panel approves schools budget (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Oregon pot agency director Burns fired (Portland Oregonian)

Night market proposed for downtown Bellingham (Bellingham Herald)
Backlog on park updates in Kitsap (Bremerton Sun)
Marysville fire chief retiring (Everett Herald)
Deal may be set for KapStone labor talks (Longview News)
Longview traffic cams bring in $1 million a year (Longview News)
State auditor inquiry may date to 2013 (Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian, Olympian)
Tumwater looks at road repair tax increase (Olympian)
Cost of measles control could hit $200k (Port Angeles News)
High prices sending people from King to Pierce (Seattle Times)
Clark Co enrolls 42k in health exchanges (Vanvouver Columbian)

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Mar 26 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Bergdahl charged with desertion (Boise Statesman, IF Post Register, Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune, Pocatello Journal, Moscow News)
Low snow having effects on Idaho (Boise Statesman)
Statewide common core tests arrive (IF Post Register)
Legislators consider new tax, spending package (Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune)
UW med school exclusivity dropped by legislature (Moscow News)
Moscow-Pullman airport prepares for new runway (Moscow News)
St Lukes plans expansion at Nampa into hospital (Nampa Press Tribune)
New concealed carry bill progresses (Pocatello Journal)

Army Corps moves to limit birds (Astorian)
UO archivists fired after their data release (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard)
Oregon bill considers sex assault privacy (Eugene Register Guard)
Klamath Co ranks low in health study (KF Herald & News)
Klamath named to participate in Blue Zone project (KF Herald & News)
Fire starting in warm winter (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Bergdahl charged with desertion (Portland Oregonian)

Bellingham buys 21 acres for park (Bellingham Herald)
Cantwell hits safety on oil cars, offers bill (Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbiann, Bellingham Herald, Olympian)
Kitsap transit hits financial trouble (Bremerton Sun)
Cowlitz health stats improve (Longview News)
Bergdahl charged with desertion (Spokesman Review, Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Few notes to track schedule of Auditor Kelley (Seattle Times, Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Kilmer calls on Canada to help with sewage (Port Angeles News)
Port Angeles council goes to work on budget (Port Angeles News)
$15 minimum wage at Seattle may not apply to UW (Seattle Times)
UW med school exclusivity dropped by legislature (Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic)
Clark Co grows faster than Portland area (Vancouver Columbian)
Dispute over voting attorney fees continues (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Mar 25 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Idaho gets low score on ethics report (Boise Statesman)
Report says Idaho wasted $61m on school management (IF Post Register, Lewiston Tribune)
Washington asked to alter salmon fishing rules (Lewiston Tribune)
What’s happening with WA auditor scandal? (Moscow News)
New Nampa library beset by weak budgets (Nampa Press Tribune)
Canyon liquor sales keep rising (Nampa Press Tribune)
Highway bill stalled again in House (Nampa Press Tribune)
House passes new concealed carry bill (TF Times News)

House agreed to county timber payments (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Medford Tribune, KF Herald & News)
Klamath college considers bonding plan (KF Herald & News)
Medford considers change in rules on bees (Medford Tribune)
School funding bill for $7.3b advances (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Gay teacher sues local school district (Salem Statesman Journal)

Cold storage warehouse starts business in Lynden (Bellingham Herald)
Auditor inquiry focuses on employee (Tacoma News Tribune, Bremerton Sun, Kennewick Herald, Olympian, Longview News)
Sheldon returns to lead Tulalip board (Everett Herald)
Former Marysville mayor Kendall dies (Everett Herald)
DOE take new look at Hanford waste removal (Kennewick Herald)
Two leading Franklin co managers departing (Kennewick Herald)
State considers changing retirement benefits (Olympian)
Most Olympia voters support $15 minimum wage (Olympian)
Interest grows in Port Angeles air service (Port Angeles News)
Amazon taking over huge chunk of Seattle downtown (Seattle Times)
Grain elevator may become superfund site (Spokane Spokesman)
Report says Idaho wasted $61m on Schoolnet (Spokane Spokesman)
Fife won’t let Tacoma use jail (Tacoma News Tribune)
Bill would allow state-tribal deals on pot (Vancouver Columbian)

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Mar 24 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Legislature considers statewide Uber bill (Boise Statesman)
Instant racing bill could kill Les Bois track (Boise Statesman)
House clears teacher pay bill (Lewiston Tribune)
Lewiston district evaluates high school renovation (Lewiston Tribune)
Moscow continues single-stream recycling (Moscow News)
College students warn of fair rental housing issues (Moscow News)
Feds will reconsider their Lake Lowell use rules (Nampa Press Tribune)
Has Add words backlash event drawn threats? (Nampa Press Tribune)
Tuition raise okayed at CSI (TF Times News)
Burley and Cassia police agreement still tense (TF Times News)

Springfield hospital ranks one of OR’s priciest (Eugene Register Guard)
Pushing again for Klamath passenger air service (KF Herald & News)
Snow about to drop on Cascades (KF Herald & News)
Jackson joins drought counties (Medford Tribune)
Oregon’s wildfire insurance may be dropped (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Oregon Supreme Court: animals not crime victims (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Researching possible gluten-free wheat (Portland Oregonian)
Lobby day brings school spending advocates (Salem Statesman Journal)

Anticipating lower dairy food prices (Bellingham Herald)
Arlington airport issues shown in report (Everett Herald)
WSU hopes for funds to expand at Everett (Everett Herald)
Gatherings around state will focus on Hanford (Kennewick Herald)
State auditor says he’s complying with fed inquest (Seattle Times, Tacoma News Tribune, Yakima Herald Republic, Olympian, Longview News)
Clallam Commissioner Chapman opts out in ’16 (Port Angeles News)
Some debt still applies to destroyed Oso homes (Seattle Times)
Clark auditor cleared of GOP charges (Vancouver Columbian)

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Mar 23 2015

In the Briefings

Published by under First Take

Boise reserve
hoto from the cover of the Boise Reserves Management Plan, released for public review in March. (photo/via Boise Parks & Recreation Department)

 
Spring kicks in with sadly diminished snowpack, and the legislature comes to grips with budget issues.

Transportation funding and school budgets (and especially the sub-component of teacher pay) are on deck this week at the Idaho Legislature.

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Mar 23 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

More gun legislation at Idaho legislature (Boise Statesman)
More wolves in Washington state (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
Pullman looks at priorities (Moscow News)
State juvenile agency sued on abuse charges (Nampa Press Tribune)
Teacher speak on career ladder plan (TF Times News)
Concerns arise over wilderness gold mine plan (TF Times News)

Some snow expected in Cascades (Eugene Register Guard)
Overhaul planned at Howard Prairie near Ashland (Medford Tribune)
Saltzman missing lots of Portland Council meetings (Portland Oregonian)
Salem plans talks on Uber and land use (Salem Statesman Journal)

Tribes take opposing views on coal shipments (Bellingham Herald)
Looking at grocery conversions to Haggen (Bremerton Sun)
Army Corps hold Toutle River plan approval (Longview News)
Wolves doing well in eastern Washington (Vancouver Columbian, Olympian)
Hargrove works on recidivist legislation (Port Angeles News)
REI stores prospering this year (Seattle Times)
Possible help for Seattle streetcars, fewer car lanes (Seattle Times)
Seattle ends race messages on cups (Seattle Times, Yakima Herald Republic)
Millennial trends push transit policy (Spokane Spokesman)
Click cable faces higher station costs, again (Tacoma News Tribune)
Rivers medical pot plan draws debate (Vancouver Columbian)

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Mar 22 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Looking at the next round of major school tests (Boise Statesman)
Ness credited with fixing Transportation Department (Boise Statesman)
St. Al’s criticizes Lt Luke’s Weiser takeover (Boise Statesman)
Jefferson’s Restoring Integrity Project matters (IF Post Register)
Looking at Idaho health care costs (Lewiston Tribune)
Kerby juggles scholarship legislation (Nampa Press Tribune)
Idaho jobless rate falls to lowest in 7 years (TF Times News)
Cannabis oil test bill still alive (TF Times News)
Legislators still pursue federal lands takeover bill (TF Times News)

2-wheel vehicles could run reds under bill (Eugene Register Guard)
Crime victims falsely notified of prisoner releases (Eugene Register Guard, KF Herald & News)
Drought brings some federal assistance (Medford Tribune, KF herald & News)
Police getting trained for mental health issues (Medford Tribune)
School advocates blast Democratic state budget (Medford Tribune)
Looking back on Kitzhaber’s final days (Portland Oregonian)
Food stamp program working with food farm (Salem Statesman Journal)

State auditor inquiry continues (Bellingham Herald)
Re-evaluating Port Orchard weekend foot ferry (Bremerton Sun)
Reviewing Oso slide at one year (Seattle Times, Everett Herald, Yakima Herald Republic, Olympian)
What’s happening with Cowlitz casino? (Longview News)
Very low snowpack in Washington (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Avista Utilities considering a power rate increase (Spokane Spokesman)
Rivers talks of supporting transport package (Vancouver Columbian)

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Mar 21 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

About climate change in Idaho’s mountains (Boise Statesman)
City of North Bonneville running its own pot shop (Boise Statesman)
State road funding bill dies in House (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
Memorial calls for federal judge impeachments (Lewiston Tribune, TF Times News)
Teacher pay bill funds some consensus (Lewiston Tribune)
Planning for parks in Nampa, Caldwell (Nampa Press Tribune)
New concealed carry bill moves ahead (Nampa Press Tribune)
Buhl Herald newspaper will close (TF Times NEws)

Bear paws inquiry underway at Eugene (Eugene Register Guard)
Good salmon fishing at Oregon coast this year (KF Herald & News)
New asphalt plant gets planning approval (Medford Tribune)
Brown announces drone range funds (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Cops planning for more stoned drivers (Pendleton E Oregonian)
GMO potatoes, apples get FDA ok (Medford Tribune, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Pendleton nearing pot shop rules (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Ethics, transparency bills stall at legislature (Portland Oregonian)
Federal drought aid offered (Portland Oregonian)
Max will try pay-to-enter at two new Orange stops (Portland Oregonian)

Impact statement on coal terminal will take a year (Bellingham Herald)
Bill would add fiscal note to initiatives (Bremerton Sun)
Stillamguamish Valley pushes on (Everett Herald)
Snohomish County may yet change building rules (Everett Herald)
Homeless at shelter told not to call cops (Longview News)
FDA okays some GMO apples, potatoes (Olympian)
Federal inquiry into state auditor expands (Seattle Times, Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Will drought emergency areas grow? (Vancouver Columbian)
Feds ordered to pay farmer attorney fees (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Mar 20 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Health insurance costs rise again this year (Boise Statesman)
Instant racing repeal progresses (Boise Statesman)
Looking at snowpack levels for spring (Lewiston Tribune)
Palouse aquifer committee onsiders water supply (Moscow News)
Pullman police argue need for more officers (Moscow News)
Better picture on veteran employment (Nampa Press Tribune)
Career ladder bill gets a hearing (Nampa Press Tribune)
FabriKal of Michigan will build Burley plant (TF Times News)

UO bears down on meningits shots (Eugene Register Guard)
Klamath hoping for new air service (KF Herald & News)
Brown visits Pendleton, talks housing (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Wyden seeks extension of power line input (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Stakes to be lowered in school test under bill (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Background released on Marshall stalking case (Portland Orgonian)
Looking at new motor voter laws (Salem Statesman Journal)

Calls for fines after BNSF train leakage (Bellingham Herald)
Home of state auditor searched by feds (Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Bellingham Herald, Olympian)
Pay raises for teamsters, management approved (Bremerton Sun)
Harvey field airport considers expansion (Everett Herald)
WA senators talk about Oso aftermath (Everett Herald)
No renovations at Clatskanie coal dock (Longview News)
New superintendent hired at Tunwater schools (Olympian)
Clallam’s economic growth council dissolves (Port Angeles News)
Seattle may ban smoking in city parks (Seattle Times)
State looks to increase oversight of logging (Seattle Times)
Big part of Bertha rises to Seattle ground (Tacoma News Tribune)
Clark moves ahead on big rapid transit (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima election system still in court wrangle (Yakima Herald Republic)
Yakima clerk agrees to new records system (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Mar 19 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Looking at Harris Ranch expansion (Boise Statesman)
Reformers press ahead at Lewiston youth homes (Lewiston Tribune)
Legislative leaders struggle with adjournment (Lewiston Tribune)
Schools at Latah graduate more than state on average (Moscow News)
WSU seeks new entryway project (Moscow News)
Teacher pay bill both rises, falls in Idaho House (Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News)
House floor considers transportation bill (Nampa Press Tribune)
Anti-bully bill moves in legislature (Pocatello Journal)
Another version of concealed carry bill emerges (Pocatello Journal)
Issues raised with new high school grad system (TF Times News)

Balderas named new Eugene school superintendent (Eugene Register Guard)
6th UO student may have meningococcal virus (Eugene Register Guard)
New call center opens at Eugene in April (Eugene Register Guard)
House votes against drone-aided hunting (KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Ghost hunters investigating Klamath county building (KF Herald & News)
Medford board questions history textbook (Medford Tribune)
Jackson County proposes new library building deal (Medford Tribune)
Public records law in Oregon called weak (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Brown will talk drones on visit to Pendleton (Pendleton E Oregonian)
New bill would background nearly all gun transfers (Portland Oregonian)
Looking at religious uynaffiliated in Portland (Portland Oregonian)
Using goats to go after weed problems (Salem Statesman Journal)

Mt Baker ski area won’t reopen as planned (Bellingham Herald)
Dog leashing rules change on Bainbridge Island (Bremerton Sun)
Heavy dusts, some wildfires expected in east (Kennewick Herald)
Salmon, others at risk over ocean warming (Longview News)
State Auditor Kelley’s home searched by feds (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Port Angeles now has pot shops (Port Angeles News)
Clallam continues developing pot rules (Port Angeles News)
Seattle mayor seeks $900m transport levy (Seattle Times)
Spokane inmate acted as pimps from jail (Spokane Spokesman)
Spokane cops have varied racial distribution (Spokane Spokesman)
New judge named at Clark County (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima County starts work on redistricting (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Mar 18 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Redfish Lake marina docks need replacement (Boise Statesman)
More solar power ahead for Idaho Power (Boise Statesman)
Extra $92 million appears in Idaho revenues (Lewiston Tribune)
Sea changes may impact salmon diets (Lewiston Tribune)
Administration head Luna may resign (TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune)
Moscow police consider diversity training (Moscow News)
County officials look at Syringa park (Moscow News)
Concealed carry bill goes through more changes (Nampa Press Tribune)
Major snow geese die-off in east Idaho (Pocatello Journal)
Contractors often not bound by public records law (TF Times News)

Judge looks at release of hatchery fish (Eugene Register Guard)
Large investor in UO apartment complex (Eugene Register Guard)
Klamath area hit with ‘extreme’ drought (KF Herald & News)
Massive Medford police, gunman standoff (Medford Tribune)
Drought is on, but so is E Oregon planting (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Pendleton okays $1.7m for airport (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Attorney plans Oregon right to work initiative (Portland Oregonian)
United Streetcar falls short of expectations (Portland Oregonian)
Unemployment in Oregon falls to 5.8% (Salem Statesman Journal)

Part of Bellingham port area may be rebuilt (Bellingham Herald)
Bremerton plans heavy work on thoroughfare (Bremerton Sun)
Plans call for raising Narrows tolls two times (Bremerton Sun)
Water committee in Longview considers options (Longview News)
Study finds $15 wages not hurting restaurants (Seattle Times)
UW study finds breast biopsy results often wrong (Seattle Times)
Hotel finances raise questions at Spokane (Spokane Spokesman)
Clark area seeks $9.3m for capital efforts (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima asks review of city districts decision (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Mar 17 2015

On the front pages

Published by under First Take

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Telemedicine/abortion bill moves ahead (Boise Statesman)
New bonds will fund a number of school projects (Boise Statesman)
‘Constitutional carry’ bill stopped (Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune, Pocatello Journal)
State, county officials urge Lowell plan change (Nampa Press Tribune)
Canyon P&Z looks at beekeeping rules (Nampa Press Tribune)
Might this be an early fire season? (Pocatello Journal)

Oregon starts new motor-voter effort (Eugene Register Guard, Medford Tribune, KF Herald & News, Pendleton E Oregonian)
UO trustee questions sexualized cheer dances (Eugene Register Guard)
Another business joins in Lakeview biofuels (KF Herald & News)
Medford pot halt hasn’t stopped dispensary (Medford Tribune)
Judge orders another look at Roseburg forest plan (Medford Tribune)
Another firearm background check bill surfaces (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Looking at Portland-area dog bites (Portland Oregonian)
Amanda Marshall under investigation (Portland Oregonian)
Naughton named administrative services chief (Salem Statesman Journal)

Many school bills still float in legislature (Bremerton Sun)
Federal case finds fire department discriminated (Bremerton Sun)
Snohomish jail reforms generating savings (Everett Herald)
Woodland struggles with pot issue (Longview News)
I-405 tolls could hit $10 (Longview News)
President of Whitman College will lead Evergreen (Olympian)
Inslee bill seeks to tax and regulate e-cigs (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Olympic peninsula seeing snow, flood, harbor sewage (Port Angeles News)
How one Seattle school is growing grad rates (Seattle Times)
Spokane sees 43 construction projects (Spokane Spokesman)
Vancouver push for safety with oil trains (Vancouver Columbian)
Bill would seek to preserve DNA (Vancouver Columbian)
Decision time coming on how Yakima clerk operates (Yakima Herald Republic)

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WASHINGTON-OREGON-IDAHO Our acclaimed weekly e-pubs: 35-45 pages Monday mornings getting you on top of your state. Samples available. Contact us by email or by phone at (208)484-0460.

 

 
RIDENBAUGH BOOKS
 


 
This will be one of the most talked-about Idaho books in Idaho this season: 14 years after its last edition, Ridenbaugh Press has released a list of 100 influential Idahoans. Randy Stapilus, the editor and publisher of the Idaho Weekly Briefing and author of four earlier similar lists, has based this one on levels of overall influence in the state – and freedom of action and ability to influence development of the state – as of the start of 2015.
 
100 Influential Idahoans 2015. By Randy Stapilus; published by Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 202 pages. Softcover. List price $16.95.
100 Influential Idahoans 2015 page.

100 Influential Idahoans 2015
Idaho
 
 
"Essentially, I write in the margins of motherhood—and everything else—then I work these notes into a monthly column about what it’s like raising my two young boys. Are my columns funny? Are they serious? They don’t fit into any one box neatly. ... I’ve won awards for “best humorous column” though I actually write about subjects as light as bulimia, bullying, birthing plans and breastfeeding. But also bon-bons. And barf, and birthdays." Raising the Hardy Boys: They Said There Would Be Bon-Bons. by Nathalie Hardy; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 238 pages. Softcover. $15.95.
Raising the Hardy Boys page.

 

Hardy

 
"Not a day passes that I don’t think about Vietnam. Sometimes its an aroma or just hearing the Vietnamese accent of a store clerk that triggers a memory. Unlike all too many soldiers, I never had to fire a weapon in anger. Return to civilian life was easy, but even after all these years away from the Army and Vietnam I find the experience – and knowledge – continue to shape my life daily."
 
Drafted! Vietnam in War and in Peace. by David R. Frazier; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton OR. 188 pgs. Softcover. $15.95.
The DRAFTED! page.

 

Drafted
 
Many critics said it could not be done - and it often almost came undone. Now the Snake River Basin Adjudication is done, and that improbable story is told here by three dozen of the people most centrally involved with it - judges, attorneys, legislators, engineers, water managers, water users and others in the room when the decisions were made.
Through the Waters: An Oral History of the Snake River Basin Adjudication. edited by the Idaho State Bar Water Law Section and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 300 pages. Softcover. $16.95.
See the THROUGH THE WATERS page.


 
Oregon Governor Vic Atiyeh died on July 20, 2014; he was widely praised for steady leadership in difficult years. Writer Scott Jorgensen talks with Atiyeh and traces his background, and what others said about him.
Conversations with Atiyeh. by W. Scott Jorgensen; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 140 pages. Softcover. $14.95.
The CONVERSATIONS WITH ATIYEH page.

Atiyeh
 
"Salvation through public service and the purging of awful sights seen during 1500 Vietnam War helicopter rescue missions before an untimely death, as told by a devoted brother, leaves a reader pondering life's unfairness. A haunting read." Chris Carlson, Medimont Reflections. ". . . a vivid picture of his brother Jerry’s time as a Medivac pilot in Vietnam and contrasts it with the reality of the political system . . . through the lens of a blue-collar, working man made good." Mike Kennedy.
One Flaming Hour: A memoir of Jerry Blackbird. by Mike Blackbird; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 220 pages. Softcover. $15.95.
See the ONE FLAMING HOUR page.


 
Back in Print! Frank Church was one of the leading figures in Idaho history, and one of the most important U.S. senators of the last century. From wilderness to Vietnam to investigating the CIA, Church led on a host of difficult issues. This, the one serious biography of Church originally published in 1994, is back in print by Ridenbaugh Press.
Fighting the Odds: The Life of Senator Frank Church. LeRoy Ashby and Rod Gramer; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 800 pages. Softcover. $24.95.
See the FIGHTING THE ODDS page.


 
JOURNEY WEST

by Stephen Hartgen
The personal story of the well-known editor, publisher and state legislator's travel west from Maine to Idaho. A well-written account for anyone interested in Idaho, journalism or politics.
JOURNEY WEST: A memoir of journalism and politics, by Stephen Hartgen; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, here or at Amazon.com (softcover)

 

 

NEW EDITIONS is the story of the Northwest's 226 general-circulation newspapers and where your newspaper is headed.
New Editions: The Northwest's Newspapers as They Were, Are and Will Be. Steve Bagwell and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 324 pages. Softcover. (e-book ahead). $16.95.
See the NEW EDITIONS page.

How many copies?

 
THE OREGON POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

The Field Guide is the reference for the year on Oregon politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Compiled by a long-time Northwest political writer and a Salem Statesman-Journal political reporter.
OREGON POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Hannah Hoffman; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
THE IDAHO POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase is the reference for the year on Idaho Politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Written by two of Idaho's most veteran politcal observers.
IDAHO POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
without compromise
WITHOUT COMPROMISE is the story of the Idaho State Police, from barely-functioning motor vehicles and hardly-there roads to computer and biotechnology. Kelly Kast has spent years researching the history and interviewing scores of current and former state police, and has emerged with a detailed and engrossing story of Idaho.
WITHOUT COMPROMISE page.

 

Diamondfield
How many copies?
The Old West saw few murder trials more spectacular or misunderstood than of "Diamondfield" Jack Davis. After years of brushes with the noose, Davis was pardoned - though many continued to believe him guilty. Max Black has spent years researching the Diamondfield saga and found startling new evidence never before uncovered - including the weapon and one of the bullets involved in the crime, and important documents - and now sets out the definitive story. Here too is Black's story - how he found key elements, presumed lost forever, of a fabulous Old West story.
See the DIAMONDFIELD page for more.
 

Medimont Reflections Chris Carlson's Medimont Reflections is a followup on his biography of former Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus. This one expands the view, bringing in Carlson's take on Idaho politics, the Northwest energy planning council, environmental issues and much more. The Idaho Statesman: "a pull-back-the-curtain account of his 40 years as a player in public life in Idaho." Available here: $15.95 plus shipping.
See the Medimont Reflections page  
 
Idaho 100 NOW IN KINDLE
 
Idaho 100, about the 100 most influential people ever in Idaho, by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson is now available. This is the book about to become the talk of the state - who really made Idaho the way it is? NOW AN E-BOOK AVAILABLE THROUGH KINDLE for just $2.99. Or, only $15.95 plus shipping.
 

Idaho 100 by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson. Order the Kindle at Amazon.com. For the print edition, order here or at Amazon.