Oxbow
Candidates Gone Wold. On stage.

Portland held its regular Candidates Gone Wild event – featuring Portland-area candidates – at the Bagdad Theatre.

A travel ruling affecting the Clearwater National Forest was upheld at the regional level; but another ruling, about the Whitman-Wallowa National Forest, was put on hold internally. In Washington, jobs are up but the unemployment rate remains flat. In Idaho, the jobless rate fell below 8%. Mountain Home Air Force Base formally installed a new commander.

Chicken pox cases were found at the Oregon state pen. The Washington state health agency is planning to expand its involvement with Medicaid activities. The last round of legislation from the 2012 Idaho legislative session was signed into law. Washington state government found a string of ways to reduce its ink pen purchases, cut its choices for printing paper building and reduced toner and ink cartridge buys by more than three-fourths.

The congressional delegation from the Spokane area issued a statement in favor of the North Corridor project. The Oregonian endorsed candidates in primary contests in all five Oregon U.S. House districts. Washington released its mid-month regulatory proposals. Idaho was slated to receive more than $20 million from settlements in drug legal cases. Congressional campaign contributions were reported (and results show up in this week’s Briefings).

Much more in the Briefings. Contact us for more.

Share on Facebook

Digests

Orting
Setting up the new food bank at the former funeral home, in Orting. (Image from Pierce County TV)

In Orting, they’ve turned a funeral home into a food bank, which may be a positive metaphor for something. Elsewhere, the region settles down into a post-policy mode as the last-adjourning of its legislature (Washington’s) hit the sine die mark last week.

There were other governmental marks – the signing of the last legislation passed in the Oregon session (no vetoes this year for the one-time Dr. No) and the opening of a new east side courthouse building in Multnomah County – but more of the activity seemed to be environmental and cultural. A new study showed electric vehicle use in the region seems to be headed upward. A mountain lion was caught near Pocatello, even as reverberations continue over wolf hunting (or tracking, in the case of OR-7 near Oregon).

But in Oregon and Idaho, primary elections are only weeks away. Expect more politics in next week’s editions.

Interested in getting the Briefing in your Monday e-mail? Send a note to [email protected].

Share on Facebook

Digests

Oxbow
Renovation work end at the Oxbow regional park just east of Troutdale, Oregon.

The economy shows signs of stabilizing into a slow growth, and the Washington legislature shows signs of stabilizing, period. And much of Idaho is riveted by a viral photo of a wolf hunt (even as Oregon’s OR-7 re-crosses into California).

Meantime Oregon, which comes up first in the Northwest with its round of primary elections, begins to get ready. Newspaper endorsements last week (Oregonian, city council, no surprises) were one early sign of that.

And much more in this week’s three editions of the Briefing, for Washington, Oregon and Idaho.

Share on Facebook

Digests

Seattle Police Chief John Diaz talks about the proposed policy changes the department plans in the wake of federal inquiries.

The legislature ended its yearly work in Idaho, but plodded on in special session in Washington. And the region was awash in rain. Some of the mountains were re-packed with snow (the point of the Oregon edition’s cover).

Seattle saw a response from the city to federal concerns about police department policies on use of force and related issues. (That’s the police chief in the Washington briefing cover picture above, explaining those responses.)

If you’d like to see a full copy of the briefing, just drop us a line at [email protected]

Share on Facebook

Digests

In what might have been a quiet political week, some political uproar, in Washington and Oregon at least. In Washington, Representative Jay Inslee resigned to become (full time) gubernatorial candidate Inslee. The Washington legislature continued with its squabbles over the budget.

But those aroused less emotion than the squabbles in the Idaho Legislature over an abortion ultrasound bill, which the Senate passed and sent to the House, which at first seemed likely to pass it as well. Then a committee hearing on it was abruptly canceled, and the bill looked as if it might be held in committee. Meanwhile, the legislature moved toward adjournment, likely this week.

More in the Washington, Oregon and Idaho Briefings.

Share on Facebook

Digests

Another round of federal approval to go after sea lions, which have been going after fish (as is their wont), has gotten federal approval, and we’re more likely to see stepped up activity along that front in Washington and Oregon.

In Washington and Idaho, meanwhile, legislatures continue on. Budget battles are the big issue in Washington, as a coalition of Senate Republicans plus a few Democrats have began to face off against the larger-majority House Democrats. (Will they use up the rest of their special session time on this?) In Idaho, budget issues are mostly resolved, but others still abound as legislators hope for adjournment soon – from the ultrasound bill in the Senate to the ethics issues involving Senator Monty Pearce.

More on all this and more in this week’s Washington, Oregon and Idaho’s weekly briefings. Write us ([email protected]) for more information or a sample.

Share on Facebook

Digests

Coming up Monday in the Washington, Oregon and Idaho Public Affairs Digests, stories about:

How wolves may be helping another predator species, the Canada lynx.

The meaning behind the new yelloweye rockfish efforts.

The impact of the significant auto fabrication plant opening in Moses Lake.

The abrupt launch of wildfires around the region.

The big Hanford contract just given to a local Richland firm.

Studies of how the middle class in Oregon, and wages overall in Idaho, are fast losing ground.

Share on Facebook

Digests

sheep
Shearing sheep in a late Oregon winter. (photo/Linda Watkins)

Washington and Idaho legislative sessions moved toward final budget decisions as March moved into April, while Oregon’s legislators began rolling out their major initial proposals – though final action there may be several months away.

Economic indicators in Oregon and Washington continued cautiously upward, though on a slow trajectory.

Some of the larger stories in the Washington edition:

bullet CenturyLink-Qwest merger completed

bullet Still little consensus over Alaskan Way

bullet Highway spending report

bullet Efficiency projects launched at UW

In the Oregon edition:

bullet Budget committee chairs release proposal

bullet CenturyLink-Qwest merger completed

bullet Not all Portland utility money goes to utilities

bullet New biodiesel fuel requirement

In the Idaho edition:

bullet Third bill in Luna proposal passes

bullet CenturyLink-Qwest merger completed

bullet PUC rejects conservation fund proposal

bullet A child abuse proclamation

Share on Facebook

Digests

Canyon County
Idaho Democrats speak at a Canyon County event. (photo/Idaho House Democrats)

Washington and Idaho legislative sessions moved toward their climaxes, with major budget structuring underway in Washington and a couple of major bills – the last of the Tom Luna overhaul bills, which cleared the Senate, and the guns on campus bill, which died there – moving toward final action.

Economic indicators in Oregon and Washington continued to point cautiously upward.

Some of the larger stories in the Washington edition:

bullet Prison safety initiatives planned

bullet Tacoma port volume triples

bullet Seattle allows park and ride options

bullet Island farming

In the Oregon edition:

bullet CenturyLink-Qwest merger approved by PUC

bullet Representatives urge small-county payments

bullet SEIU proposes state budget shifts

bullet Commission offers global warming report

In the Idaho edition:

bullet Third bill in Luna proposal passes

bullet Personal income growth in Idaho dips

bullet Wolf litigation sans Idaho

bullet Idaho State enrollment drops

Share on Facebook

Digests

Brookings
Tsunami damage at Brookings harbor. (image/Department of Energy)

Tight state budgets continued as a leading thread in Northwest news this week; Washington reported an enormous $778 million drop in anticipated revenues. Cuts rather than revenue increases appeared to continue to be the preferred alternative at all three legislatures to dealing with the shortfalls.

Economic indicators in Oregon and Washington were pointing up, with Oregon posting its largest one-month gain in jobs in 15 years. And in Idaho, two major public school laws were signed into passage, and another was under revision in the Senate.

Some of the larger stories in the Washington edition:

bullet Revenue estimate: A $778 million drop

bullet Washington job numbers improve

bullet Constantine proposes stimulus

bullet Worker compensation bill signed

bullet Cantwell: Crack down on gas speculation

In the Oregon edition:

bullet Major job additions in February

bullet Two wilderness areas proposed

bullet No radiation from Japan

bullet Tax credit information still hard to get

In the Idaho edition:

bullet Otter signs two Luna plan bills

bullet Wolf litigation partly resolved

bullet Senior water rights upheld over juniors

bullet Otter signs geothermal leasing bills

Share on Facebook

Digests

Brookings
Tsunami damage at Brookings harbor. (image/Office of Governor John Kitzhaber)

The Friday tsunami did not do the damage in the Northwest it did in Japan, but there was some damage – most notably in Brookings, where an emergency situation persists.

Idaho saw passage through the legislature of two major education overhaul bills, likely to be signed early this week. Legislative and economic news were key elements in this week’s Digests.

Some of the larger stories in the Washington edition:

bullet Locke nominated as ambassador to China
bullet Emissions agreement hits home in Centralia
bullet Vehicle emission changes proposed
bullet CMLK would-be bomb suspect arrested
bullet Death with Dignity update

In the Oregon edition:

bullet Tsunami hits South Oregon coast
bullet Job openings increasing in Oregon
bullet Wyden co-sponsored wireless tax bill
bullet Workplace deaths decline

In the Idaho edition:

bullet Luna school plan passes legislature

bullet Activists plan Luna recall

bullet Census releases new numbers on Idaho

bullet Idaho Power irrigation plan approved

Share on Facebook

Digests

train derail
A trail derails at University place. (image/Pierce County)

The legislative sessions continue to heat up, especially in Idaho but in Washington as well, in this week’s Public Affairs Digests for Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Also a lot else, including more on census results, more developments on the Columbia Crossing project, .

Some of the larger stories in the Washington edition:

bullet Seattle Council overrides Alaskan Way veto
bullet Columbia Crossing comment sought
bullet Viaduct work may save old building
bullet Census results and education

In the Oregon edition:

bullet Kitzhaber leans activist at Portland City Club
bullet Unemployment rate sticks at 10.4%
bullet Blumenauer on “ungreening” the Capitol
bullet Three Imnaha wolves grabbed

In the Idaho edition:

bullet Protests over Luna school plan
bullet McClure remembered
bullet Unemployment rate unchanged
bullet Governors call for forest restoration

Share on Facebook

Digests

Boeing tankers
Boeing gets the tanker contracts. (image/Boeing)

The legislative sessions continue to heat up, especially in Idaho but in Washington as well, in this week’s Public Affairs Digests for Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Also a lot else, including reports on the Air Fo0rce tanker contract for Boeing.

Some of the larger stories in the Washington edition:

bullet Census: Minority population grows fast
bullet Recovery project completed at Hanford
bullet Record DNA hits in state labs
bullet The Nisqually quake, 10 years after

In the Oregon edition:

bullet Census: Minority population grows
bullet Kitzhaber sets up review of the unneeded
bullet Wyden urges Patriot Act review
bullet Crime is down, but …
bullet Automatic admissions policy set
bullet Similarities to New Zealand quake
bullet Re-looking at Columbia River treaty

In the Idaho edition:

bullet Parts of Luna proposal clear Senate
bullet AG: Mortgage tops consumer complaints
bullet Archeological closures near Cottonwood
bullet Brownlee water levels drop

Share on Facebook

Digests

Obama at Hillsboro
President Barack Obama visiting Intel at Hillsboro. (vidcap/White House stream)

Lots of legislative activity – new legislation, still – in this week’s Public Affairs Digests for Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Also a lot else, including last week’s presidential visit to Hillsboro.

Some of the larger stories in the Washington edition:

– NW leaders say they’ll take rail money
– McGinn vetoes Alaskan Way deal
– Senators propose freight act
– Workplace deaths rise in Washington
– Reporting on extreme tides

In the Oregon edition:

– Obama makes Hillsboro visit
– Kitzhaber names department heads
– Roberts named to Metro Council
– Ag amounts to 15% of Oregon economy
– Mollala River measure returns
– $48 million for state health insurance
– New Blue Book out in e-firm first

In the Idaho edition:

– Revisions offered on Luna plan
– Idaho Power signs four wind agreements
– Meridian bans smoking in parks
– Crapo backs monument limit bill
– Geddes on his new job

Share on Facebook

Digests

digest
weekly Digest

The elections last week – recounted in detail to the legislative and judicial level for Washington, Oregon and Idaho – were dominant elements of Northwest developments in the new Digests. The results moved Washington and Oregon closer to the center, and Idaho more Republican than it already was.

Elections aside, the week was busy on plenty of other developments, in area from the economy (some continuing bad news, but not entirely) to education and arrival of still more federal programs that got little press attention.

As a reminder: We’re now publishing weekly editions of the Public Affairs Digests – for Idaho, Washington and Oregon – moving from a monthly to a weekly rundown of what’s happening. And we’re taking it all-electronic: The print edition will be moving to e-mail.

That means we can include more information, and get it out a lot faster: The weekly Digests will be in your in-box first thing Monday morning. If you subscribe, of course: That’s $59 a year, for 50 issues and the yearbook. Yes, including the yearbook. The Idaho Yearbook, which we published for years up to 2002, will return early in 2011 – in printed book form – and Digest subscribers get it for free with their subscription. And the Oregon and Washington yearbooks will be coming out at the same time.

If you’d like to take a look at one of the new weekly Digests, here’s a link to the Idaho edition, to the Oregon edition and to the Washington edition. If you’d like to subscribe, here are the links (through to PayPal) for Idaho, for Oregon and for Washington.

Share on Facebook

Digests