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Posts published in “Briefings”

In this week’s Briefings

car dragged
 
Marion County Sheriff's Office last weekend responded to the 2900 block of Wintel Road SE because Kyle Randall, age 24 was knocking on doors and asking residents for a place to sleep. After arriving deputies noticed a plume of smoke in the distance that turned out to be a car fire. When they went to investigate the fire they located the burned out carcass of the vehicle Randall had been driving. So after interviewing Randall and evaluating the scene deputies believe the following occurred. At around 5 a.m. Mr. Randall was driving east on Wintell Road when he drove through a stop sign and ran into a passing train. The train hooked his vehicle and drug him approximately 300 feet. Randall came to a rest, exited his vehicle and then sought out shelter from nearby residents. Randall was not injured in the crash, he was however arrested for DUII and taken to the Marion County Jail. At the jail his blood alcohol level was more than twice the legal limit. (Photo/Marion County Sheriff's Office)

 
Political news is ramping up in this week's editions of the Briefings, along with a range of other activities, from recovery at Oso (and plans for President Obama's visit there) to the odd case pictured above of a car crashing into a train in Oregon, dragged 300 feet - after which the driver walked away apparently without a scratch.

In this week’s Briefings

Oregon

 
IN THE OREGON WEEKLY BRIEFING The 173rd Fighter Wing will conduct night flying operations April 14-17, 2014, between approximately 9 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. Night flying is one part of the course curriculum for F-15 student pilots at Kingsley Field. "Night flying is a critical skill which our students need to learn to be effective war fighters," said Col. Jeremy Baenen, 173rd Fighter Wing commander. "We understand the disruption to the community during night flying weeks, but we try our best to minimize the noise impact." The community will most likely hear the jets during take-offs and approaches to and from Kingsley Field. Most of the training will occur in military operating airspace east of Lakeview.” (Photo/Oregon Military Department)

 

This week’s Briefings

cubs
 
Zawadi Mungu, proud father of the pride, is now spending time with his cubs. He’s a 500-pound mega-carnivore capable of pulling a buffalo to the ground, but Zawadi Mungu now plays a new role: cat toy. Last week, the male lion ventured outside with his trio of energetic cubs for the first time, and demonstrated a remarkable tolerance for a flurry of pint-sized attacks on his mane, tail and patience. The cubs were first introduced to their dad in their indoor den a few days earlier.. (photo/Oregon Zoo)

 

The end of the legislatures - concluding last week in Oregon, probably next in Washington and possibly the week after in Idaho - were persistent subjects in this week's Briefings.

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Mountain lion killed near Boise (Boise Statesman)
Critiques of state, CCA agreement (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune, Pocatello Journal)
Clearwater Paper says Lewiston site important (Lewiston Tribune)
Review of Idaho, Washington gambling (Lewiston Tribune)
Dorn's McCleary plan for school funds (Moscow News)
Bolz will opt out of legislature this year (Nampa Press Tribune)
Electric grid upgraded around Firth (Pocatello Journal)
Rural broadband support measure advances (Sandpoint Bee)

Heavy snow hits again (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, KF Herald & News, Corvallis Gazette Times)
County official says commissioners knew of changes (Eugene Register Guard)
Graduation rates assessed (Hermiston Herald, Ashland Tidings)
Bureau of Reclamation water management (KF Herald & News)
Local film festival leadership change (Ashland Tidings)
Medford teacher strike day 2 (Medford Tribune)
Bates plans dredge mining rule changes (Medford Tribune)
PERS legislation and local budgets (Pendleton East Oregonian)
Energy mandate rules may change (Portland Oregonian)
Salem YWCA splits from national group (Salem Statesman Journal)

500 with low income get vouchers (Everett Herald)
Ads coming to state web sites (Everett Herald)
Shooing terns from Columbia islands (Kennewick Herald)
Grandview will do free summer school (Kennewick Herald)
More Bertha damage (Seattle Times)
Questioning if there were 700K at fest (Seattle Times)
Idaho trap snares Canadian lynx (Spokane Spokesman)
WA House members pay rises (Tacoma News Tribune)
Heavy snow again (Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic)

From the WA briefing

Bellingham Bay

 The Port of Bellingham and Washington Department of Ecology removed approximately 230 cubic yards of contaminated soil from the construction site. The soil is contaminated with low levels of metals and hydrocarbons. The soil is stockpiled nearby while arrangements are made to properly dispose of it. Crews have been investigating the area known as the Westman Marine cleanup site for contamination left behind from previous boat and shipyard work dating back to the 1940s. (photo/via Department of Ecology)
 

In the briefings

bridge conference
 
Press confernce at the Skagit bridge. (photo/Washington Department of Transportation)
 

Collapse of the Interstate 5 bridge over the Skagit River near Mount Vernon was the hot topic last week and into this one – even occurring as it did near the end of the week. I-5 is the major throughway for most people in Washington and not only that, the major west coast throughway. A break in its run anywhere is a critical matter.

And it matters not only for that but also for the proposed Columbia Crossing project to the south, over the Columbia River between Portland and Vancouver. Its fate hangs in the balance as the special session of the legislature hits its heart and decision time approaches.

In the Briefings

osprey
OSPREY HATCH: Transportation Department crews placed an osprey nest atop a high platform; soon an osprey flew by to inspect their work. ITD environmental planners were concerned that relocating the nest from the Del Rio Bridge on the U.S. 20 business loop east of St. Anthony would drive the birds away. Twenty minutes after ITD workers left the site, however, an osprey landed, apparently ready to homestead.. (image/Idaho Department of Transportation)

 

This week's Briefings were heavy on legislative and post-legislative activity, but there was plenty of resource news too ... such as the posting of a nest of Osprey in Idaho.

In this week’s Briefings

portneuf exhibit
 
One of the images on display at the exhibit “Nature Photography of The Portneuf Valley in Spring” sponsored by the Idaho Museum of Natural History, on display in the Cordillera Gallery at Walrus and Carpenter Books April 5. (image/Idaho State University)

 

Legislature wrapup was a key subject last week in Idaho, and showdowns in Washington as well; the setup for a possible jam-through of the budget chairs' PERS bill may be the big deal this week in Salem.

Meantime, and not unrelated, springtime seems to be kicking in.

More followup in next week's Briefings.

In the Briefings

dog at legislature
 
Shelby, a dog attacked by a wolf, is accompanied in the hallway outside hearing rooms by a group of legislators.

 

In Washington, the economic picture looks a little better – not a lot, but a little – after the latest economic update came in last week. Atop that, unemployment rates seem to be holding steady too.

In the Briefings this week

jewell
JEWELL AT SENATE: Interior Secretary-designate Sally Jewell speaks before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee in Washington. The committee, which includes Washington Senate Maria Cantwell, was holding a hearing on her confirmation. (image/Office of Senator Cantwell)

 

In Washington, couple of seemingly counter headlines, about an unemployment rate that remains the same, but overall improvement (albeit modest) in the state economic picture. The two are reconciled to some degree by the additional statistic that the overall number of jobs rose during January, meaning that the rate reflected more people in the labor force.

In Idaho, the Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee last week drafted a public school budget that seems likely to gain clearance (since there was not a lot of dissension surrounding it). Odds are that will translate to a relatively quick legislative session, possibly ending by the close of this month.