Archive for the 'Briefings' Category

Sep 15 2014

In the Briefings

Published by under Briefings

biggs bridge

 
The US 97 Biggs Rapids-Sam Hill Bridge, though only 51 years old, is starting to show its age in the form of peeling paint and rust. Starting in summer 2014, we’ll clean and paint the structure to preserve it for the years ahead. (photo/Department of Transportation)

 

You would think this will be a big issue in the legislative races, which really are where the action is in Washington politics this year: The Washington Supreme Court holding the legislature in contempt on education spending. Democrats and Republicans hold distinctly different responses to this, and it ought to be a useful subject for voters to consider. Maybe for that reason, much of the response on the legislative side so far has been, well, a little muted.

Wildfires are not yet done; Oregon was the only Northwest state still listed by the National Interagency Fire Center as having large wildfires unresolved as of the end of last week. More will be coming next week.

Share on Facebook

No responses yet

Sep 08 2014

In the Briefings

Published by under Briefings

Ice Harbor Dam
 

Ice Harbor Dam, on the lower Snake River near Pasco, has been a fruitful site for technical innovations that are helping increase the survival of endangered and threatened fish passing federal dams. (Photo/ U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, by David G. Rigg)

 

A week of fall kicking in: Football at Seattle and the opening of schools around the state. Otherwise, a relatively quiet news week. But with campaigns about to kick in, that won’t last long.

Check the massive proposal project coming to the Port of Portland (see the economics section in the Oregon issue). This is a potentially major project, with all kinds of implications, which so far has gotten very little reaction or reportage in regional news media.

In Idaho: The decision was only preliminary – not deciding the case but only choosing to keep it alive – but the decision by Federal Judge Lynn Winmill on the state’s “ag-gag” law will be closely parsed in coming weeks. A close reading finds some suggestion that Winmill sees significant argument for tossing the law. What kind of negotiations may be quietly underway in this area over the next few weeks?

If you’re not subscribing to the Weekly Briefings, you’re missing out on what’s happening in your state and the Northwest. Send me a note for a sample copy.

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Sep 01 2014

In the briefings

Published by under Briefings

trail

 
The Washington State Department of Natural Resources opened a new trail for mountain bikes August 30, in Tiger Mountain State Forest in eastern King County. The addition of the 2.5-mile-long Off-the-Grid Trail increases the forest’s mountain bike trail system to approximately 15 miles. (photo/Washington Department of Natural Resources)

 

In this coming week, Monday is Labor Day, and after that – the general election campaign season gets underway in earnest. Some political ads have been airing up to this point, but the number will increase greatly in the next few weeks. Only about six weeks remain, after all, until ballots begin to hit the mail.

In Idaho, the Snake River Basin Adjudication has been one of the most significant legal-economic-environmental developments in Idaho over the last quarter-century, though it has proceeded quietly, mostly, over the last decade or so. Last week, a milestone: The signing of the final, or unified, decree. Look for coverage in the View and Legal sections.

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Aug 18 2014

In the Briefings

Published by under Briefings

grandcouleeG24-Runner-removal

 The Bureau of Reclamation prepared for turbine removal and disassembly by mapping the inside of the Third Power Plant at the Grand Coulee Dam to ensure laydown space and safe working conditions for 12 to 15 years of complex mechanical overhaul activities. (photo/Bonneville Power Administration)

 

Yet another week of heavy duty wildfires in Washington, in what’s beginning to look like an ongoing cycle that may last another month and more.

As stories emerged nationally about the arming of local police – with military surplus equipment, sometimes stronger than that used by soldiers in actual war zones – Oregon emerged as, in relative terms, one of the less heavily armed states. More on this in View in this issue.

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Aug 11 2014

In the Briefings

Published by under Briefings

Snag Canyon
 
The Snag Canyon fire started on the afternoon of Saturday, August 2. The fire was ignited by lightning. It is currently estimated at 8,842 acres and is 25% contained. Despite Red Flag Warnings for high winds, crews were able to hold the fire and make good progress on containment lines.. (photo/Inciweb)

 

Washington’s primary election (see the results spread over several pages in this issue) yielded little by way of shockers, but plenty of general interest. Such as a first, in pitting two Republicans against each other in a congressional district (the 4th). And a series of prospectively hotly contested state Senate races.

Politics in Oregon seem fairly static – at least, that’s what you draw from the SurveyUSA report appearing in the politics section. It seems to suggest that what you think will happen (based on past experience), probably will be happening, this year, again.

Water would seem to be just the solution for a state wracked by wildfires. And so it was last week, to a point. But recent flash flooding now has deluged – in sudden surprises – Pocatello and Twin Falls, and wiped out stretches of some key backcountry roads. Looking ahead for the next week: More hot and dry (and fire conditions?).

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Aug 04 2014

In the Briefings

Published by under Briefings

lightning
 
Fierce lightning hit the Willamette Valley on the night of July 31, in some places knocking down trees and doing other damage. This photo was taken near Carlton in Yamhill County. (photo/Brad Salter)

 
This week offered a little bit of a breather on the fire front, as burning on the massive Carlton Complex eased back. But emergency conditions persist across much of the state, and we’re still just about to enter what is normally the peak of wildfire burning season.

In Oregon and Idaho, political television spots for the fall general election season are just about to hit the airwaves – August being the month that starts to happen. Watch for some dark money ads coming in this time around. Meanwhile, Washington prepares for it top two.

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Jul 28 2014

In this week’s Briefings

Published by under Briefings

tolo bridge
 

Spanning Interstate 5 north of Central Point, the 58-year old Tolo Road Bridge (milepost 36) will undergo repairs, which requires a six-week closure to traffic beginning Monday, July 28. Local traffic will use Willow Springs Road as a detour. The Tolo Road Bridge is being repaired to extend its life and prevent it from being load-limited. The Tolo Road Bridge rehabilitation is part of the same project that is repaving I-5 from Rock Point (exit 43) to Evans Creek (MP 49). Knife River of Central Point is the prime contractor. . (photo/Department of Transportation)

 
Check out this week’s list of wildfires around Oregon – a list nearly as long as the list of wildfires all across the country. The saving grace is that none of them were of the enormous size (none anywhere close to as large as Washington’s Carlton Complex) but they add up to a lot.
Fire was an even bigger story in Washington, where the Carlton Complex turned into the biggest single fire in the state’s history.
And fire season still is early.

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Jul 21 2014

In the Briefings

Published by under Briefings

lookout view

 
Taken from Scott Mountain Lookout, 11 miles to the north and with a straight view towards the fires. It was taken at 5 PM on July 18. Wash Fire is the smoke on left, Grimes Fire is the smoke on right. (photo/Boise National Forest)

 
Fire became the big story of the week all over the northwest (at least, from the Cascades east). The fire sizes were not notably large – yet – but a number of them were aggressive, and at least one ravaged several human settlements. This is an early point in the year for this sort thing; it portends a rough season ahead.

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Jul 13 2014

In the Briefings

Published by under Briefings

holmes at store
 
Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes joined other major I-502 sponsors at noon Tuesday at the opening of Cannabis City, the first of Seattle’s allotted 21 retail marijuana stores to open. Holmes became the fourth person to make a purchase at Cannabis City – two packages of two grams each of “OG Pearl.”
“Just over three years ago I stood with Alison Holcomb in Seattle’s Central Public Library to announce the launch of what became Initiative 502, to legalize, regulate and tax marijuana for adult recreational use,” Holmes said. “Now I’m honored to stand with Alison again at the opening of the very first I-502 store in Seattle, Cannabis City.” Holcomb was the architect of the I-502 campaign while Holmes was a prime sponsor. (Photo/Office of the Seattle City Attorney)

 

Summer has finally arrived, in some force, with hotter temperatures than up to now – and hotter in most places than normal for this point in July. With the outbreak of mid-sized wildfires around the region, there’s some concern growing about fire risk and about water supplies.

The big Washington story was, of course, the opening of several state-legalized pot shops; Oregon and Idaho saw less dominant stories in the week after Independence Day.

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Jul 07 2014

In the briefings

Published by under Briefings

otter at rally

 
Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter speaks at the God and Country Festival of the Treasure Valley July 2 at the Idaho Center at Nampa. (image/Otter campaign)

 

The big story last week almost everywhere in the Northwest: The great weather surrounding the 4th of July holiday, and the local celebrations within. That became part of the political story too, as many candidates participated in Independence Day events. (Tougher activities will ensue in coming months.)

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Jun 30 2014

In the briefings

Published by under Briefings

guard training

 
Two Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with Golf Troop, 141st Brigade Support Battalion, guard an entry control point at the 2-218th Field Artillery Battalion compound at Yakima Training Site, Wash., June 21. Several Oregon Army National Guard units converged on the training site for their two-week annual training cycle. (Photo/Master Sgt. Nick Choy, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs).

 

The federal section is busy this week with congressional action. That may reflect the upcoming congressional recess (over the July 4 period), when congressional news usually slows. Many members of Congress will be back in their home states and district in the coming week, up through July 7 or so.

Next week may be a little quieter, given the long (and Friday-driven) weekend this week for the 4th.

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Jun 23 2014

In the Briefings

Published by under Briefings

yakima fest
Yakima last weekend held its first Blues and Brews Bash on North Front Street.

 
A little more emphasis this week on economic news, which is looking up a bit: The jobs picture is improving a little (the percentage rate stayed about the same in Washington, but the number of jobs is up, and the jobless rate fell in Idaho) and, as an indicator, state tax revenues are coming in higher than expected.

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Jun 16 2014

In the Briefings

Published by under Briefings

moose
 
On June 10 Fish and Game conservation officers and biologists responded to reports of a moose wandering around a southeast Boise neighborhood. The yearling female moose was spotted in various locations including Warm Springs Golf Course. Because the moose had been slowly moving closer to town, Southwest Regional Wildlife Manager Craig White made the decision to tranquilize it, and relocate it. The moose was taken out of the city and moved to a more remote location off Highway 21. (image/Department of Fish & Game)

 

Politics continued to pour in last week, polling in Oregon (Senate and governor) and the Republican convention in Idaho – a remarkable convention that broke up in rancor without electing leadership or passing a platform or resolutions. it drew a good deal of attention, some of it national since the honorary chair, Representative Raul Labrador, is also running for House majority leader.

A somewhat quieter week on the Washington side.

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Jun 02 2014

This week’s Briefings

Published by under Briefings

obama bergdahl

Standing in the White House Rose Garden the afternoon of May 31, President Barack Obama spoke about the recovery of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl — an American soldier who spent nearly five years in captivity during the war in Afghanistan. Standing with Sgt. Bergdahl’s parents, Bob and Jani, from Hailey, the President said that “while Bowe was gone, he was never forgotten.”. (image capture/White House)

 
After the crush of the primary election and its immediate aftermath, things quieted down a bit and ease off with the passage of Memorial Day and the (de facto) arrival of summer.

But there was news. The release of long-term POW Bowe Bergdahl made regional news at the end of the week. In Oregon and Idaho, the parties pulled themselves together (as much as they could) as work begins for the general election. And the last stages of prep begins for the summer recreation season.

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

May 26 2014

In the Briefings

Published by under Briefings

Seattle bike
 
How an intersection might look on the future Waterfront depicts the connections between bicycles, pedestrians and vehicles.. (image/Seattle Department of Transportation).

 

Elections, of course, dominated news coverage last week in Oregon and Idaho, as a U.S. Senate contest provided some of the big headlines in the former, and a battle of two slates within the Idaho Republican Party offered drama in the latter.

Washington, just a week away from its candidate filing period and still in a relatively quiet political moment, saw less dramatic headlines. A series of noteworthy studies, however, were released around the state shining fresh spotlights on a range of topics. See more about all of this in the Oregon, Idaho and Washington Briefings, out this morning.

Share on Facebook

Comments Off

Next »

 


The latest tv ad for Idaho gubernatorial candidate A.J. Balukoff.

 

Back in Print! Frank Church was one of the leading figures in Idaho history, and one of the most important U.S. senators of the last century. From wilderness to Vietnam to investigating the CIA, Church led on a host of difficult issues. This, the one serious biography of Church originally published in 1994, is back in print by Ridenbaugh Press.
Fighting the Odds: The Life of Senator Frank Church. LeRoy Ashby and Rod Gramer; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 800 pages. Softcover. $24.95.
See the FIGHTING THE ODDS page.


 
JOURNEY WEST

by Stephen Hartgen
The personal story of the well-known editor, publisher and state legislator's travel west from Maine to Idaho. A well-written account for anyone interested in Idaho, journalism or politics.
JOURNEY WEST: A memoir of journalism and politics, by Stephen Hartgen; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, here or at Amazon.com (softcover)

 

 

NEW EDITIONS is the story of the Northwest's 226 general-circulation newspapers and where your newspaper is headed.
New Editions: The Northwest's Newspapers as They Were, Are and Will Be. Steve Bagwell and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 324 pages. Softcover. (e-book ahead). $16.95.
See the NEW EDITIONS page.

How many copies?

 
THE OREGON POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

The Field Guide is the reference for the year on Oregon politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Compiled by a long-time Northwest political writer and a Salem Statesman-Journal political reporter.
OREGON POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Hannah Hoffman; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
THE IDAHO POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase is the reference for the year on Idaho Politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Written by two of Idaho's most veteran politcal observers.
IDAHO POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
without compromise
WITHOUT COMPROMISE is the story of the Idaho State Police, from barely-functioning motor vehicles and hardly-there roads to computer and biotechnology. Kelly Kast has spent years researching the history and interviewing scores of current and former state police, and has emerged with a detailed and engrossing story of Idaho.
WITHOUT COMPROMISE page.

 

Diamondfield
How many copies?
The Old West saw few murder trials more spectacular or misunderstood than of "Diamondfield" Jack Davis. After years of brushes with the noose, Davis was pardoned - though many continued to believe him guilty. Max Black has spent years researching the Diamondfield saga and found startling new evidence never before uncovered - including the weapon and one of the bullets involved in the crime, and important documents - and now sets out the definitive story. Here too is Black's story - how he found key elements, presumed lost forever, of a fabulous Old West story.
See the DIAMONDFIELD page for more.
 

Medimont Reflections Chris Carlson's Medimont Reflections is a followup on his biography of former Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus. This one expands the view, bringing in Carlson's take on Idaho politics, the Northwest energy planning council, environmental issues and much more. The Idaho Statesman: "a pull-back-the-curtain account of his 40 years as a player in public life in Idaho." Available here: $15.95 plus shipping.
See the Medimont Reflections page  
 
Idaho 100 NOW IN KINDLE
 
Idaho 100, about the 100 most influential people ever in Idaho, by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson is now available. This is the book about to become the talk of the state - who really made Idaho the way it is? NOW AN E-BOOK AVAILABLE THROUGH KINDLE for just $2.99. Or, only $15.95 plus shipping.
 

Idaho 100 by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson. Order the Kindle at Amazon.com. For the print edition, order here or at Amazon.


 

    Top-Story-graphic-300x200_topstory8
    Monday mornings on KLIX-AM

    watergates

    ORDER IT HERE or on Amazon.com

    More about this book by Randy Stapilus

    Water rights and water wars: They’re not just a western movie any more. The Water Gates reviews water supplies, uses and rights to use water in all 50 states.242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

    intermediary

    ORDER IT HERE or on Amazon.com

    More about this book by Lin Tull Cannell

    At a time when Americans were only exploring what are now western states, William Craig tried to broker peace between native Nez Perces and newcomers from the East. 15 years in the making, this is one of the most dramatic stories of early Northwest history. 242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

    Upstream

    ORDER HERE or Amazon.com

    The Snake River Basin Adjudication is one of the largest water adjudications the United States has ever seen, and it may be the most successful. Here's how it happened, from the pages of the SRBA Digest, for 16 years the independent source.

    Paradox Politics

    ORDER HERE or Amazon.com

    After 21 years, a 2nd edition. If you're interested in Idaho politics and never read the original, now's the time. If you've read the original, here's view from now.


    Governing Idaho:
    Politics, People and Power

    by James Weatherby
    and Randy Stapilus
    Caxton Press
    order here

    Outlaw Tales
    of Idaho

    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here

    It Happened in Idaho
    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here

    Camping Idaho
    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here