Archive for the 'Briefings' Category

Mar 16 2015

In the Briefings

Published by under Briefings

Friday Harbor
 
Measurements were collected from the dock at Friday Harbor Labs, which also is used for experiments that simulate future ocean acidification levels. Water was also collected from the pumphouse, the small brown building in the background on the left. (photo/J. Meyer, University of Washington)

 

The Washington legislature is reaching its cutoff points; by the end of this week, Washingtonians should have a clearer idea of what will be up for final action and what won’t. In Oregon, the legislature has slowed its pace a little, and may cool a little more this week as Republicans return from their pair of unofficial annual gatherings.

Idaho legislators have been hoping to aim for session shutdown by the end of next week, but that’s looking increasing unlikely amid battles over highway funding and teacher pay.

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Mar 09 2015

In the briefings

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outside waiting

 
People who use e-cigarettes, own and work at vape shops, gather outside the Multnomah Building before the March 5 board meeting, at which new county rules on vaping were adopted.

 
The Oregon Legislature has begun to kick out a number of pieces of legislation, including some major measures on subjects ranging from motor-voter to clean fuels. It’s beginning now to look as if a busy session lies ahead.

More ‘shot heard ‘round the world’ quotes emerged last week from Idaho legislators, which may give leadership all the more incentive to try to shut down before the end of March (as is the current plan).

In Washington, the legislature is hitting its relative frenzied peak, with lots of legislation scrambling for position before the series of cutoffs hits and wipes out most of the prospects.

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Feb 16 2015

This week’s Briefings

Published by under Briefings

Kitzhaber

 
Governor John Kitzhaber on January 12, about a month before he would announce his resignation. (photo/Office of the Governor)

 
The resignation of Governor John Kitzhaber completely preoccupied Salem and much of the rest of Oregon last week. (It became a national and international news story.) Next: What happens as new Governor Kate Brown takes office and develops a new administration?

In Washington, the legislature has gotten down to business – which is to say, questions of money. Transportation and education budgets were the subject of negotiations last week, and more will emerge this week. By the end of this week, it may be clear whether one legislative session will suffice, or more will be needed.

The most long-range significant event of last week in Idaho may have been the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decision on the St. Lukes and Saltzer merger, which may set major guidelines for health care administration in the state – or, guidelines that might be addressed by law. The implications are far reaching; news coverage of the case was much less so.

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Feb 08 2015

This week in the Briefings

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animal

 
Representatives Earl Blumenauer and Mike Fitzpatrick (R-PA) on February 4 introduced The AWARE Act to ensure that farm animals used in agricultural research at federal research facilities be included in the definition of “animal” under the Animal Welfare Act. The Animal Welfare Act ensures that certain minimum standards of humane care are adhered to in federal and private research facilities. However, the Act defines “animal” in a way that egregiously excludes farm animals used in agricultural research. Blumenauer and Fitzpatrick spoke with leaders from the Humane Society of the United States and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) at a press conference. (photo/Representative Blumenauer)

The Seahawks’ Super Bowl loss was duly reported around the state Sunday evening and Monday morning, and then quickly dropped. (What Seahawks?) Some advocates, however, pointed put that overall the team had played two spectacularly sucessful seasons in a row, and a Super Bowl return in 2016 does not seem an unreasonable prospect.

Oregon’s political picture was upended last week with the continuing difficulties of Governor John Kitzhaber – a press conference that went awry, a subsequent call for his resignation from the Portland Oregonian and later a couple of recall proposals. The pressure is not likely to let up in the week ahead.

In Idaho, school broadband concerns – and the growing probability of a shutdown of school broadband in the state – took front stage last week. Elsewhere, the legislature began moving toward budget-setting, which may be a closely related topic.

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Feb 02 2015

In the briefings

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barney football

 
Barney, male harbor seal at the Seattle Aquarium with a Seahawks football. The aquarium said, “Our harbor seals (Barney, Q and Siku) got another fumble return and touchdown pass practice in today before the big game this weekend.” (Photo/Seattle Aquarium)

 

We’ll have a little more about the Super Bowl in next week’s Washington Briefing, but the basics are well enough known already: The Seahawks lost a competitive game after what was called the “worst play ever” called by their coach, resulting in the New England Patriots taking control of the ball at a critical moment.

Elsewhere around the three states, legislatures get into full swing – now in Oregon as well as in Washington and Idaho – with financial and other decisions in play.

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Jan 19 2015

In the Briefings

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gun

 
Tactical Export Strategies has organized 13 Idaho recreation-technology (rec-tech) companies to create a complete and functioning firearm from Idaho-made products. This firearm will be on display at the 2015 Shooting Hunting and Outdoor Trade (S.H.O.T) Show in Las Vegas at the Sands Expo Center January 20-23, 2015, in the Idaho Commerce booth (booth 2943).  (Image/Idaho Department of Commerce)

 
The Oregon Ducks’ loss at the national championship level stung, and it may not have been exactly the right note on which to launch the Oregon Legislature and re-swear in (for the fourth time) Governor John Kitzhaber. But the timing was fixed. A large portion of the governor’s combination inaugural and state of the state speech is in this edition along with a commentary on its unusual content.

The Washington Legislature launched last week, with much of the attention going to the governor’s state of the state address; much of it is reprinted in this edition. A pile of legislation was introduced as well, and some samples are referenced in the state section.

As per usual, the Idaho Legislature hasn’t immediately roared into action – things move a little slower in the first couple of weeks – but a lot of attention went to the governor’s state of the state address. A large chunk of it is reprinted in this issue, along with part of the Democratic response.

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Jan 12 2015

In the Briefings

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Newhouse
 
The Northwest’s newest member of Congress, Dan Newhouse (third from left) of Washington’s 4th district, is sworn into office by House Speaker John Boehner. (photo/Office of Representative Newhouse)

 
Here comes the legislature – over the next week.

That means different things in the three states. In Washington and Idaho, the legislatures kick off into full regular sessions starting today, with governor’s state of the states among the leading early activities (today in Idaho, tomorrow in Washington. In Oregon, a pro forma organizational session will be held today and tomorrow, with a speech from the governor (combining inaugural and state and the state), but the full legislative session won’t begin until February 2.

In the next Briefings you’ll find full reports on the governor’s address, the early legislation filed and early statements and policy moves.

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Dec 15 2014

In the Briefings

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bighorns

 
The Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife captured and relocated California bighorn sheep at several locations this week to improve genetic diversity among herds and continue efforts to restore this native species in Oregon. Bighorns were captured in the Deschutes and John Day River canyons and in the Branson Creek area of Grant County. Fifteen sheep captured in the Deschutes River Canyon were released at Alvord Peaks (Harney County) and 20 sheep captured in the John Day River Canyon went to McClellan (Grant County). (photo/ODFW)

 

As new officeholders prepare for transitions and the governor begins dropping proposals for the new legislature, things generally are cooling down in advance of the Christmas-New Years holidays.

One more Briefing in 2014 – next week – and then we’ll pause for a week during the Christmas-New Year’s interregnum.

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Dec 08 2014

In the Briefings

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Tillicum

 
Starting December 4 a second test of the aesthetic lighting on the Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People will take place. It will test the full spectrum of colors and the subtle motion that will change with the seasons and the activity of the Willamette River. The aesthetic lighting was created by artists Douglas Hollis and the late Anna Valentina Murch for the Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Transit Project’s Public Art Program. The public can view the lights from both sides of the Willamette River near the bridge. (photo/Tri-Met)

 
No lack of protests in the Seattle-Portland areas last week, not just up north in Seattle but plenty in Portland too. They may, in the Portland fashion, continue for a while.

With the Idaho legislature organized, lawmakers return home for a month of preparation for the three months or so of session. So too will the lobbyists, several times in number compared to the legislators. Bills are being readied for introduction. We’ll keep a look out.

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Dec 01 2014

In the Briefings

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Christmas tree

 
Straight from the Tillamook State Forest, this Noble Fir went up in the Capitol Rotunda. (photo/Department of Forestry)

 
Entering the holiday limbo between Thanksgiving and Christmas, a good deal of legislative preparation work (which long since has begun) will kick into high gear. Expect to see more of that next week.

The next term of the Idaho Legislature opens next week with its two-day (or so) organizational session, when leadership positions and committee assignments are filled. We’ll have a report on that next week.

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Nov 24 2014

In the Briefings

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Spalding bridge

 
Repair work was recently completed on the Spalding Bridge, taking state Highway 8 over the Clearwater River. See the story in the transportation section. (photo/Idaho Transportation Department)

 
This week will be a quiet stretch in official action in the Northwest states (as elsewhere), with the Thanksgiving holiday dominating the latter part of the week. There’ll be plenty of news stories, of course, about Black Friday (and Black Thursday).

Whatever your plans: happy Thanksgiving!

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Nov 16 2014

In the Briefings

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Washington at 215

 
Hundreds gathered in the Capitol Rotunda Tuesday afternoon to join in the state’s 125th birthday celebration. Among the state officials speaking at the event were Gov. Jay Inslee (First Lady Trudi Inslee also spoke) and Secretary of State Kim Wyman. (Here Wyman, at the podium, shares a laugh with the governor, to the right.) Lt. Gov. Brad Owen and Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn also attended. Former Secretary of State Ralph Munro emceed the celebration, which included the introduction of the 2014 Capsule Keepers, who were sworn in by Wyman near the Centennial Time Capsule at the south end of the Legislative Building. (photo/secretary of state)

 
Moving on from the elections, a range of other topics came to the fore last week – education policy, environmental concerns and more. Not to mention the first big snow storm of the season.

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Oct 27 2014

In the Briefings

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isu mammoth

 
A team of Idaho State University students carefully brush and clean a mammoth skull discovered near American Falls Reservoir in mid-October. The specimen was excavated and transferred from the site to the Idaho Museum of Natural History in Pocatello on October 18. (photo/Dave Walsh, for Bureau of Reclamation)

 

Only one more week of campaigning remains, and then the numbers come in. Because of the large number of people voting early, you might expect campaigning to scale down just a bit in the week ahead.

Meanwhile, the big Northwest story of the week was the school shooting at Marysville, Washington, which left two dead and others seriously injured.

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Oct 14 2014

On the front pages

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news

Cylvia Hayes may be becoming the most controversial – or at least one of the two or three most – first ladies in American gubernatorial history, and that’s putting aside the unusual circumstance of her not being (yet at least) married to the governor. There’s now two separate hot news stories about her background (the green-card marriage and her involvement in a Washington property which may have been used in an illegal pot grow), plus questions about the relationship between her consulting business and role in the governor’s office, and now Governor John Kitzhaber’s call for a state ethics review of that latter situation. Up to this point her background has seemed unlikely to have any real effect on the governor’s race; could that be reaching a tipping point?

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Legal clear for same-sex marriage in Idaho (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News, Pocatello Journal)
Smith Group Auto mvoes location (IF Post Register)
Governor’s race ads in sharp conflict (IF Post Register)
New Horizons school bus transport in dispute (Nampa Press Tribune)
ID Democrats lead in funds in several races (Nampa Press Tribune)
Voting begins in Idaho begins today (TF Times News)

Cylvia Hayes and the pot grow site (Portland Oregonian, Corvallis Gazette)
New Eugene apartments not aimed at students (Eugene Register Guard)
Springfield, Cottage Grover on pot tax (Eugene Register Guard)
New director sought for Klamath airport (KF Herald & News)
Merrill former recorder imprisoned (KF Herald & News)
Jackson Co library hours enhanced (Medford Tribune)
Reviewing Medford Ward 2 council race (Medford Tribune)
Hermiston plans withdraw from service district (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Kitzhaber seeks review of Hayes’ ethics (Portland Oregonian, Salem Statesman Journal, Pendleton E Oregonian)
Still no changes in state abaonded car efforts (Portland Oregonian)
State employment department records hacked (Salem Statesman Journal)
West Salem traffic awaiting end to upgrades (Salem Statesman Journal)

Reviewing the open Kitsap auditor race (Bremerton Sun)
Hospice operation at East Bremerton closes (Bremerton Sun)
Still difficult partking at local college (Longview News)
Guns on ballot: background check measure winning (Vancouver Columbian, Olympian)
UW dinner meetings in open-meeting gray area (Seattle Times)
Reviewing 5th district US House race (Spokane Spokesman)
Growing deer nuisance in Spokane area (Spokane Spokesman)
Vancouver school board blasted on meetings (Vancouver Columbian)
Washington seeing record apple crop (Yakima Herald Republic)
Reviewing 14th district House race (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Oct 13 2014

On the front pages

Published by under Briefings

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Fire department bond considered (Boise Statesman)
Reviewing Winmill ruling on sage grouse (Boise Statesman, TF Times News)
Restoring the Silverthorne Theatre at LCSC (Lewiston Tribune)
Moscow activists work against fracking (Moscow News)
Crowd opposes state taking federal lands (TF Times News)

Harrisburg plane part supplier may expand (Eugene Register Guard)
Medford may lift alcohol ban at some events (Medford Tribune)
Reviewing District 3 tight Senate race (Medford Tribune)
Oregon looks at ERA, ACLU says it’s not needed (Medford Tribune)
Looking at jail intake system in Oregon (Portland Oregonian)
Limited access for Oregon death w/dignity (Salem Statesman Journal)

Reviewing Kitsap coroner race (Bremerton Sun)
Suquamish seafood business poised to grow (Bremerton Sun)
Olympia police back in schools (Olympian)
Washington state employee labor agreements cost $583m (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Voters will consider Tacoma mayor term limit (Tacoma News Tribune)
Spokane treasurer race focuses on experience (Spokane Spokesman)
Washougal reviews arguments against oil terminal (Vancouver Columbian)
What’s proper size for a school class? (Vancouver Columbian)
Candidates competing for auditor job (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Oct 13 2014

In the briefings

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merkley biden

 
Senator Jeff Merkley was campaigning on his home turf in east Portland when he and Vice President Joe Biden stopped in for ice cream at Salt & Straw Ice Cream on Alberta Street. (photo/Merkley campaign)

 
This was a week with a couple of actual financial scandals – or at least issues that might develop that way – on the part of Oregon political figures, but they went barely remarked. That was because something even more grabby emerged: The state’s first lady, Cylvia Hayes, acknowledged that she had, in the mid-90s, married an immigrant for he could get his green card, for a $5,000 payment. The story dominated news play around the state, while another story – about the relationship between the governor’s office and Hayes’ consulting firm – got scant attention. (The other hot story that didn’t fully surface was about state Senate candidate Kim Thatcher and allegations of contracting fraud with the state.)

The string of debates between Idaho statewide candidates in Idaho last week – a number of them highly watchable and most available through online streaming – are noted in this week’s Politics section.

In Washington, the merger of marine cargo operations at the Seattle and Tacoma ports seemed the clear top story of the week in Washington state, even as campaign season reaches a peak. That may be a commentary on the relatively quiet nature of this year’s campaign season.

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Sep 29 2014

In the Briefings

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pontoons

 Another six pontoons for the new State Route 520 floating bridge are floating out of their Aberdeen casting basin September 26, marking completion of the fifth of six cycles of pontoons being built in Grays Harbor County. With this float-out, 66 of the new bridge’s 77 pontoons have been constructed, and 57 are on Lake Washington. The three remaining Aberdeen pontoons are scheduled for completion next spring. Forty-four of the bridge’s supplemental pontoons are being built in Tacoma, where work is underway on the final construction cycle there. Meanwhile, crews continue aligning, anchoring and bolting together pontoons on Lake Washington. The new, six-lane floating bridge – the longest in the world – is scheduled to open to traffic in spring 2016. (photo/Department of Transportation)

 
Few developments this week in Washington politics – at least among the candidates for office. The battle over initiatives (especially the two gun initiatives) seems to be generating more heat than the people are.

Federal lands issues were big last week. In Oregon, fires roared back, and Bureau of Land Management Sally Jewell visited small and remote Lakeview (whose BLM office oversees a vast area) on the subject of sage grouse habitat. The biggest topic of discussion, however, probably was the newly-publicized Forest Service rule on photography in wilderness areas.

Debates have been getting underway this last week, and more are coming in the next few weeks. Most are available on the web through stream. One notably worth watching: The Twin Falls debate between Superintendent of Public Instruction candidates Jana Jones and Sherri Ybarra; the link is on the web site of the Twin Falls Times News, whose managing editor moderated.

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owb1444

WASHINGTON-OREGON-IDAHO Our acclaimed weekly e-pubs: 35-45 pages Monday mornings getting you on top of your state. Samples available. Contact us by email or by phone at (208)484-0460.

 

 
RIDENBAUGH BOOKS
 


 
This will be one of the most talked-about Idaho books in Idaho this season: 14 years after its last edition, Ridenbaugh Press has released a list of 100 influential Idahoans. Randy Stapilus, the editor and publisher of the Idaho Weekly Briefing and author of four earlier similar lists, has based this one on levels of overall influence in the state – and freedom of action and ability to influence development of the state – as of the start of 2015.
 
100 Influential Idahoans 2015. By Randy Stapilus; published by Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 202 pages. Softcover. List price $16.95.
100 Influential Idahoans 2015 page.

100 Influential Idahoans 2015
Idaho
 
 
"Essentially, I write in the margins of motherhood—and everything else—then I work these notes into a monthly column about what it’s like raising my two young boys. Are my columns funny? Are they serious? They don’t fit into any one box neatly. ... I’ve won awards for “best humorous column” though I actually write about subjects as light as bulimia, bullying, birthing plans and breastfeeding. But also bon-bons. And barf, and birthdays." Raising the Hardy Boys: They Said There Would Be Bon-Bons. by Nathalie Hardy; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 238 pages. Softcover. $15.95.
Raising the Hardy Boys page.

 

Hardy

 
"Not a day passes that I don’t think about Vietnam. Sometimes its an aroma or just hearing the Vietnamese accent of a store clerk that triggers a memory. Unlike all too many soldiers, I never had to fire a weapon in anger. Return to civilian life was easy, but even after all these years away from the Army and Vietnam I find the experience – and knowledge – continue to shape my life daily."
 
Drafted! Vietnam in War and in Peace. by David R. Frazier; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton OR. 188 pgs. Softcover. $15.95.
The DRAFTED! page.

 

Drafted
 
Many critics said it could not be done - and it often almost came undone. Now the Snake River Basin Adjudication is done, and that improbable story is told here by three dozen of the people most centrally involved with it - judges, attorneys, legislators, engineers, water managers, water users and others in the room when the decisions were made.
Through the Waters: An Oral History of the Snake River Basin Adjudication. edited by the Idaho State Bar Water Law Section and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 300 pages. Softcover. $16.95.
See the THROUGH THE WATERS page.


 
Oregon Governor Vic Atiyeh died on July 20, 2014; he was widely praised for steady leadership in difficult years. Writer Scott Jorgensen talks with Atiyeh and traces his background, and what others said about him.
Conversations with Atiyeh. by W. Scott Jorgensen; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 140 pages. Softcover. $14.95.
The CONVERSATIONS WITH ATIYEH page.

Atiyeh
 
"Salvation through public service and the purging of awful sights seen during 1500 Vietnam War helicopter rescue missions before an untimely death, as told by a devoted brother, leaves a reader pondering life's unfairness. A haunting read." Chris Carlson, Medimont Reflections. ". . . a vivid picture of his brother Jerry’s time as a Medivac pilot in Vietnam and contrasts it with the reality of the political system . . . through the lens of a blue-collar, working man made good." Mike Kennedy.
One Flaming Hour: A memoir of Jerry Blackbird. by Mike Blackbird; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 220 pages. Softcover. $15.95.
See the ONE FLAMING HOUR page.


 
Back in Print! Frank Church was one of the leading figures in Idaho history, and one of the most important U.S. senators of the last century. From wilderness to Vietnam to investigating the CIA, Church led on a host of difficult issues. This, the one serious biography of Church originally published in 1994, is back in print by Ridenbaugh Press.
Fighting the Odds: The Life of Senator Frank Church. LeRoy Ashby and Rod Gramer; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 800 pages. Softcover. $24.95.
See the FIGHTING THE ODDS page.


 
JOURNEY WEST

by Stephen Hartgen
The personal story of the well-known editor, publisher and state legislator's travel west from Maine to Idaho. A well-written account for anyone interested in Idaho, journalism or politics.
JOURNEY WEST: A memoir of journalism and politics, by Stephen Hartgen; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, here or at Amazon.com (softcover)

 

 

NEW EDITIONS is the story of the Northwest's 226 general-circulation newspapers and where your newspaper is headed.
New Editions: The Northwest's Newspapers as They Were, Are and Will Be. Steve Bagwell and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 324 pages. Softcover. (e-book ahead). $16.95.
See the NEW EDITIONS page.

How many copies?

 
THE OREGON POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

The Field Guide is the reference for the year on Oregon politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Compiled by a long-time Northwest political writer and a Salem Statesman-Journal political reporter.
OREGON POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Hannah Hoffman; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
THE IDAHO POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase is the reference for the year on Idaho Politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Written by two of Idaho's most veteran politcal observers.
IDAHO POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
without compromise
WITHOUT COMPROMISE is the story of the Idaho State Police, from barely-functioning motor vehicles and hardly-there roads to computer and biotechnology. Kelly Kast has spent years researching the history and interviewing scores of current and former state police, and has emerged with a detailed and engrossing story of Idaho.
WITHOUT COMPROMISE page.

 

Diamondfield
How many copies?
The Old West saw few murder trials more spectacular or misunderstood than of "Diamondfield" Jack Davis. After years of brushes with the noose, Davis was pardoned - though many continued to believe him guilty. Max Black has spent years researching the Diamondfield saga and found startling new evidence never before uncovered - including the weapon and one of the bullets involved in the crime, and important documents - and now sets out the definitive story. Here too is Black's story - how he found key elements, presumed lost forever, of a fabulous Old West story.
See the DIAMONDFIELD page for more.
 

Medimont Reflections Chris Carlson's Medimont Reflections is a followup on his biography of former Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus. This one expands the view, bringing in Carlson's take on Idaho politics, the Northwest energy planning council, environmental issues and much more. The Idaho Statesman: "a pull-back-the-curtain account of his 40 years as a player in public life in Idaho." Available here: $15.95 plus shipping.
See the Medimont Reflections page  
 
Idaho 100 NOW IN KINDLE
 
Idaho 100, about the 100 most influential people ever in Idaho, by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson is now available. This is the book about to become the talk of the state - who really made Idaho the way it is? NOW AN E-BOOK AVAILABLE THROUGH KINDLE for just $2.99. Or, only $15.95 plus shipping.
 

Idaho 100 by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson. Order the Kindle at Amazon.com. For the print edition, order here or at Amazon.