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Notes . . .

notes

David Brooks (of the New York Times) has been on a streak for most of this year with his columns looking into what amount to political motivations – why people do what they do, politically. Sometimes they miss or overreach, but sometimes they hit home solidly. In today’s column, for example, he describes neatly the same reasons I thought last weekend’s Saturday Night Live sketch on Roy Moore (albeit it that some of it was funny) was only helping Moore. Brooks didn’t mention that point specifically, but he didn’t have to; the extrapolation doesn’t run very far:

The siege mentality starts with a sense of collective victimhood. It’s not just that our group has opponents. The whole “culture” or the whole world is irredeemably hostile.

From this flows a deep sense of pessimism. Things are bad now. Our enemies are growing stronger. And things are about to get worse. The world our children inherit will be horrific. The siege mentality floats on apocalyptic fear.

SNL was just another attack on “us” – leading to the response of, “We’ll show them.” It’s not very productive politics, but it’s what we have at the moment …

Oregon Democrats may be on the verge of their supermajority in the House at Salem. The second Republican in the last month or so has quit the House to take a job leading a lobbying organization, the Oregonian reports. Today’s is Jodi Hack of Salem; last month it was Mark Johnson of Hood River. And not long before that, John Huffman of The Dalles departed with the prospect of a job in the Trump Administration. The Johnson seat in particular is highly likely to go Democratic; Johnson has held it because of personal qualities and popularity, not any local partisan advantages. And if 2018 is a Democratic wave year, don’t be surprised if one or both of the other seats, albeit in traditionally Republican areas, fall to the Democrats as well …
 

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