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Thug in the White House

richardson

It seems like just yesterday our nation met the new White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci. Then, in the blink of an eye, he was gone.

Scaramucci’s rapid ascent and more rapid descent provide a cautionary tale. His debut interview, filled with vulgarity, was dismissed by some as merely “colorful.” But that benign description didn’t do it justice. It was a profane diatribe, replete with the most repugnant imagery imaginable.

In short order the president grew annoyed that Scaramucci’s mobtalk had eclipsed his own and decided Scaramucci had to go. But Trump knew what he was getting when he hired the guy and, according to initial reports, Trump “appreciated” Scaramucci’s trash talk, finding his shtick “amusing.” Of course he did. As former House Speaker and Trump sycophant Newt Gingrich was quick to note Trump and Scaramucci “speak the same language.” Who can doubt it? Certainly no one who remembers Trump’s “Access Hollywood” tape.

And that, of course, includes our children. Trump and Scaramucci modeled behavior that will imprint on millions of impressionable young minds just weeks before the new school year begins. Anyone want to guess what kind of taunts schoolyard bullies will be using this fall?

When I was three years old, I overheard my dad and a couple other mill workers in conversation. One of the men called someone a “no-good S-O-B.” Later, I asked my dad, “What is an S-O-B?” He paused for a moment, and then said, “It means soft old baloney.” Taking him at his word, I adopted the expression and told my mom that the boy next door was a “no-good S-O-B.” “Where did you learn to say THAT?” she asked. “From dad,” I answered. The next thing I knew, dad was getting an earful from mom, and I never used that expression again.

Of course, it’s not news that “little pitchers have big ears.” What is new is that our president is now the Vulgarian-in-Chief. We have in the Oval Office a man who treats our beloved country like a crime syndicate and who, like the mob bosses he strives to emulate, bullies and intimidates his “enemies,” with crass threats. What have we come to when our president himself encourages police brutality, brow beats vanquished opponents in a speech to the Boy Scouts, and enthrones a two-bit hood like Scaramucci in the White House?

Perhaps the most notable takeaway from the Scaramucci affair is this: “The Mooch” wasn’t fired because of what he said or how he said it. He was fired because he had begun to occupy the center stage spotlight the president reserves for himself. Scaramucci’s foul language simply provided a convenient excuse.

Scaramucci may be history, but a narcissistic thug remains in the White House.

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