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Making good, giving back

A guest opinion by Michael Stricland of Boise State University.

“I teach from the Harvard Business School cases; they’re not as exciting as what’s on ‘The Apprentice,’ ” said Beth Goldstein, an adjunct professor at Brandeis University’s International Business School, who used the show in her consulting class. “If there (was) a lesson on (the Donald Trump show), it can become integrated in the whole learning opportunity.” There has been an entire management class at the University of Washington in Seattle that is devoted to ‘The Apprentice,’. From Georgetown to Harvard Business school, the DVD from that first season is still discussed.

Fortunately that magic extends, in an even more special way, to Idaho …

I first met Troy McClain a month ago and can safely say that I am amazed at an opportunity I have to work with him on some writing. With Trump’s popularity booming, it is fascinating to take a look at this Idaho legend who first rose to the big stage on one of Trump’s reality TV shows.

“Who would have thought a country boy from Idaho could go on national television, be seen by 28 million Americans every week and still appreciate the simple things like fly fishing on a backcountry stream?” Troy’s official website reads. “That is Troy McClain. Troy’s rise to prominence happened as he climbed Donald Trump’s ladder on NBC’s ‘The Apprentice,’ advancing all the way to the finals.”

Called a “Living Energy Drink” by the Idaho Press Tribune, Troy is a ball of energy and enthusiasm who seeks to utilize his success to Give First to his community and to those who need help the most. Beating all odds, Troy rose to the top from the original 250,000 contestants, landing second only to Harvard MBA Kwame Jackson.

Starting from a challenging, low-income country upbringing, Troy’s philosophy is: The best way to get ahead is to give back. A classic rags to riches story, he has collaborated with the top names in business, including Warren Buffet, and has shared the stage with with Tony Robbins, Mark Victor Hansen (of Chicken Soup for the Soul) and many other influential leaders, athletes and entertainers. He’s served and been honored by Idaho Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter, former U.S. Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne, the Kellogg Innovation Network, Special Olympics International and a long list of others.

Troy has been outspoken about literacy and what he says educators and businesses need to do to improve the country. “We’re neutering the American entrepreneur because we don’t nurture innovation. Success leaves tracks. So follow them.”

The Gem State was not only Troy’s springboard, but the place to which he returned. Shortly after the Apprentice, he received scores of offers from all of the big cities. “Most people in business will tell you you’ve got to have your Ph.D., you’ve got to have an MBA. I tell everybody, I got my Ph.D. a long time ago. I was Poor, Hungry and Driven. That’s my Ph.D. Today, what I’m working on is my MBA. My Massive Bank Account. … But I’m going to give back. Why Idaho vs. LA or New York? The answer is that Idaho took care of me. Idaho embraced me and my family.”

Even before The Apprentice, Troy was a successful business man having owned, operated and sold his companies, from health clubs to lending institutes. Today, he is a sought after consultant, investor and mentor for business men and women looking to accomplish what he has done. He invests in Idaho and innovation and currently runs an online success club. Since the Apprentice, Troy has built up and invested in two Idaho companies.

I love the fact that he spends so much time working to pass the American Dream that he is living, on to others.

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