Press "Enter" to skip to content

The Idaho winemaking tale

strickland MICHAEL
STRICKLAND

 
Literacy

The Idaho winemaking tale is ripe and ready for picking. It all starts with the grapes, according to the Idaho State Historical Society.

Peppershock Media Productions of Nampa, Idaho has adopted this story and developed an outstanding new film. The feature length Idaho Wine From Bud to Taste Bud is ideal for introducing students to documentaries and media literacy. The work also promotes local business in order to increase economic viability and to highlight Idaho’s vineyards and wineries in the national arena. It has uses for teachers and learners across the curriculum.

The video will explore from bud to tastebud–including culinary features. It will highlight the past and fruitful future, as well as educate and explore modern agricultural, specifically viticultural, practices by seamlessly blending the voices of those whose lives are impacted by the Idaho wine industry.

Idaho is considered, by some, part of the new frontier of grape-growing areas in the United States. The first grapes planted in Idaho were actually grown in Lewiston in 1864, according to an official state website, wine.idaho.gov.

“In Idaho we’re the oft-forgotten ‘other’ state in the Pacific Northwest, said John H. Thorngate Ph.D., formerly a professor at the University of Idaho, now Applications Chemist, Research & Development, Constellation Wines U.S. “Which is rather ironic, considering that the first wineries in the Pacific Northwest were located in Idaho, and that Idaho had a nationally renowned wine industry until Prohibition, as in other regions, closed the industry down.”

Students will benefit from classroom explorations of many such little known gems of Idaho history. An article dated September 5, 1865 in the Idaho Statesman reported that a vineyard of Royal Muscadine cuttings had been planted early in the spring of the previous year (1864) and it had survived the winter well and was beginning to produce grapes.

Economics and business classes can learn more about Idaho’s fruitful future. Wine.idaho.gov says that the Idaho wine industry has been a steadily growing community for the last 30 years with remarkable growth in the past decade. With 11 wineries in 2002, Idaho is now home to more than 50, with over 1,200 acres of grapes planted. In order to see the impact Idaho wine industry is having, the Idaho Wine Commission completed an Economic Impact Study in 2014. The results were startling. It was concluded that the Idaho wine industry had a $169.3 million dollar impact in 2013 and created nearly 1,250 jobs. This growth led to an increase in visibility, more tourism, an enhanced reputation, and has created tremendous opportunity for expansion.

The Idaho Wine Commission reports that the industry will continue to grow as national wine consumption increases, as well as Idaho’s grape growing potential. Idaho wines have been discovered across the country ranking 22nd in the nation. The Idaho wine industry is just in its infancy and is expected to see remarkable growth in the next 15 years. It is just coming into its own, receiving a great deal of recognition, and winemakers and growers are learning as they go while making great wine along the way.

This narrative presents an opportunity to meet the Common Core standard that seeks integration of knowledge and ideas. Students can compare and contrast written material about Idaho wine history to the documentary. Classes would analyze the effects of techniques unique to each medium. The lighting, sound, color, camera focus and angles of film can be considered next to the tools found in written publications.

Today’s Idaho students have grown up immersed in a multimedia digital environment. And the work force our students will enter demands a more advanced, engaged learner than ever before. Idaho Wine From Bud to Taste Bud can be used in schools to help students understand that documentaries are a type of storytelling that explores factual stories and issues. By the end of the lesson, students should know the difference between fact, fiction and opinion.

Share on Facebook