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Posts published in “Day: September 1, 2014”

In the briefings

trail

 
The Washington State Department of Natural Resources opened a new trail for mountain bikes August 30, in Tiger Mountain State Forest in eastern King County. The addition of the 2.5-mile-long Off-the-Grid Trail increases the forest’s mountain bike trail system to approximately 15 miles. (photo/Washington Department of Natural Resources)

 

In this coming week, Monday is Labor Day, and after that – the general election campaign season gets underway in earnest. Some political ads have been airing up to this point, but the number will increase greatly in the next few weeks. Only about six weeks remain, after all, until ballots begin to hit the mail.

In Idaho, the Snake River Basin Adjudication has been one of the most significant legal-economic-environmental developments in Idaho over the last quarter-century, though it has proceeded quietly, mostly, over the last decade or so. Last week, a milestone: The signing of the final, or unified, decree. Look for coverage in the View and Legal sections.

Jim Risch could lose

carlson CHRIS
CARLSON

 
Carlson
Chronicles

Most voters start to pay attention to November elections after Labor Day. Here’s a gut guess that by mid-October Jim Risch will recognize that many voters have figured out he’s done nothing but vote no on everything, has been “mailing it in,” and is taking re-election for granted.

In addition, with virtually no television advertising, voters will have learned Risch has a worthy opponent who, if elected, will work for the people of Idaho. Yes, a perfect storm and a lucky break may have to happen to put Boise attorney Nels Mitchell in position to pull off the upset, but it could happen.

One key will be the phenomenal success Mitchell’s social media strategist, Morgan Hill, will enjoy. He convincingly can demonstrate his strategy is well on its way to penetrating homes of all voters who have computers.

Hill’s credentials are impeccable. Some credit him with the succcessful repeal of the “Luna Laws” because of his skill at using the Facebook connections of teachers and administrators to get out the repeal message. Republicans, with all their money, have nothing to match it.

Nels Mitchell is also demonstrating an ability to adapt as he campaigns. Initially, he talked only about Risch’s negatives. Now he skillfully weaves in a personal narrative that is starting to resonate.

And Risch is reacting. Mitchell has hit Risch hard in a newspaper ad that he will be a “working senator,” as opposed to the “coasting senator” Risch is. In an August appearance on a southeast Idaho radio station the friendly interviewer repeated a half dozen times how hard Risch is working for the people of Idaho.

It just ain’t so, but as Risch knows, you repeat the Big Lie often enough most people will believe it. However, in his case recent polling still shows his automatic re-elect to be well below the 50% number. For whatever reason, a lot of voters have doubts.

Mitchell’s challenge is to let voters know there is a worthy opponent without having virtually any money to build his name identification in the traditional way. The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee has from the very beginning written Mitchell off. This has led the traditional Labor PACS to follow suit and not contribute either. The advantage is Mitchell will arrive in D.C. beholden virtually to no one other than the people who elected him.

Since Mitchell, from his first day, also said he would only serve one term he will not have to spend time dialing for dollars begging special interest groups to contribute. (more…)

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Wilderness opposition in north Idaho (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune, Lewiston Tribune)
WA legislature sues on school funding (Moscow News)
Students often missing fare less well (Moscow News)
Feds may tighten railroad right of way rules (Nampa Press Tribune)
Staying out of jail on probation expensive (Nampa Press Tribune)
Wind energy looking for trained workers (TF Times News)
Twin Falls schools try new reading teaching (TF Times News)

UO trying for re-emphasis around genetics (Eugene Register Guard)
More Medford utility bills goes unpaid (Medford Tribune)
Concordia law school accreditation issues (Portland Oregonian)
Reviewing wilderness in Oregon (Portland Oregonian)

On-line retailers at Kitsap doing well (Bremerton Sun)
State trooper disciplined after collision (Everett Herald)
WA legislature sues on school funding (Vancouver Columbian, Kennewick Herald, Longview News)
Hanford clears two more tanks of waste (Kennewick Herald)
Drones banned from Olympic National Park (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Deep splits on gun initiatives (Port Angeles News)
Government considered as job maker (Spokane Spokesman)