"No experiment can be more interesting than that we are now trying, and which we trust will end in establishing the fact, that man may be governed by reason and truth. Our first object should therefore be, to leave open to him all the avenues to truth. The most effectual hitherto found, is the freedom of the press. It is, therefore, the first shut up by those who fear the investigation of their actions." --Thomas Jefferson to John Tyler, 1804.

Defining a party

malloy CHUCK

In Idaho

Could this election define the heart and soul of Idaho’s Republican Party? Congressman Raul Labrador makes a case for those high stakes, which led to his endorsement of Sen. Russ Fulcher for governor and a host of tea party candidates.

“We need a new vision for Idaho,” Labrador said. “We need strong leaders that understand that business as usual is what should not be happening in Idaho. We should look for fresh ideas and for new ways to make Idaho what I believe should be the gem of the whole United States, rather than be at the bottom of all the different things.”

Labrador calls for leaders to “show a vision of what Idaho will be five years from now, 10 years from now and 20 years from now.”

Cecil Andrus could not have said it better. Of course, the Fulcher-Labrador crowd offers far different solutions than Andrus, but there at least is agreement on what some of the problems are. Idaho is last in the nation in wages, and first in the relative numbers of workers receiving minimum wage. It’s at the bottom, or near the bottom, in just about all measures for education and as stories by the Statesman’s Dan Popkey and others have revealed, Gov. Butch Otter’s Project 60 has been more of a campaign slogan than a formula for economic recovery.

When Labrador talks about things like “heart and soul,” he can start with the visual contrast between the young turks and the old guard. Fulcher and Labrador are two politically ambitious men who are in the prime of their lives. Otter, the leader of the old guard, is an example of an aging politician who has been there, done that and never wants to leave.

Yes, Fulcher and Labrador are about as conservative as politicians get. But in Idaho, that’s not a bad thing. Idaho is a poor state, and there is not a high threshold for new programs and more taxes. Idaho will never be among the big spenders for education, whether it’s the public schools or higher education. Paying the minimum wage will continue to be challenging enough for businesses.

This new brand of conservatives want what almost all Idahoans want – quality schools, good roads, safe communities and quality state services. But people such as Fulcher and Labrador think there are smarter and more effective ways to manage state government and boost the economy. Fulcher talks about natural gas exploration in the Payette area and Labrador talks about Idaho becoming the next Silicon Valley.

Both say that for Idaho to move forward, old leaders have to go. “Butch Otter has done a lot of things to admire in office. But after 40 years in government, he has lost his way,” Labrador says.

Labrador, especially, is what Otter was in his younger days – a firebrand conservative who challenges the old ways of doing business. Fulcher is more measured in his approach, but he has a similar resolve.

The question that Republicans will answer on May 20th is whether they are ready for a new heart and soul.

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One Comment

  1. slfisher said:


    “Fulcher talks about natural gas exploration in the Payette area…” and everywhere else, as well as exploiting timber and mineral resources all over the state. What will that do to our environment, especially since he’s also against the EPA? What will it do to our recreational opportunities and the tourist dollars those lands bring in?

    “Labrador talks about Idaho becoming the next Silicon Valley…” Not without more investment in higher education; even the companies we have now can’t find enough tech talent to staff themselves. Idaho had a much better shot at it a few years ago, before the higher ed budget got cut, before Idaho TechConnect got cut, before Gov. Otter shut down his technology advisory board because they were getting too uppity. Silicon Valley companies don’t want to move places where they can’t be assured of finding a workforce, and existing employees don’t want to move to a place that’s anti-gay and that doesn’t invest in public education.

    “quality schools” — Sure, as long as they’re not public schools. Quality Christian schools that are funded by the state? Yes, they’re all for those.

    “Quality state services” — um, like what, exactly? They’d love to get rid of DEQ and HHS. Sen. Fulcher is basically in favor of privatizing everything and I suspect Cong. Labrador is as well.

    May 14, 2014

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