"No experiment can be more interesting than that we are now trying, and which we trust will end in establishing the fact, that man may be governed by reason and truth. Our first object should therefore be, to leave open to him all the avenues to truth. The most effectual hitherto found, is the freedom of the press. It is, therefore, the first shut up by those who fear the investigation of their actions." --Thomas Jefferson to John Tyler, 1804.

Fires keep on coming

NW Reading

A statement from the Oregon Department of Forestry, on how the wildfires are continuing late into the season.

It’s fall but the wildfires keep coming. The 18-acre Buck Mountain Fire near Eugene in late September and a smaller, but high-potential blaze Tuesday evening up the canyon from Sweet Home serve as reminders of the continuing fire danger.

South Cascade District Forester Greg Wagenblast asks hunters and other recreationists not to let their guard down.

“The humidity is low and we’re having dry easterly winds,” he said. “These conditions, combined with the cured-out grasses and bone-dry forest fuels, have set the stage for fires.”

Firefighters were fortunate to stop the Sweet Home fire at small size during the evening when burning conditions had moderated. If it had burned on into the next day, he said, the outcome might have been different.

“Right now we’re hitting every fire start hard,” he said.

The dry conditions are just one reason for the aggressive initial attack. The other is reduced fire staffing. Most Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) field districts are currently at 50 to 60 percent of their peak firefighting force, since this late in the season seasonal employees have returned to school or their regular jobs.

To cope with this year’s unusually late wildfire activity, South Cascade and the neighboring Western Lane District have extended their firefighting helicopter contract into next week.

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