Writings and observations

Wolf hunting, close up

It’s long been our thought that the policy reintroducing wolves to parts of Idaho and the west was a mistake – not just because of the impact the wolves might have on other animals and on people, but because of the impact on the wolves themselves. And beyond that, what people turn themselves into as a result.

wolf trap
“Pinching” and the bloody, slowly dying wolf/from www.trapperman.com

You can see some of that directly in the picture, reproduced from the site trapperman.com, showing a hunter with the handle “pinching” seemingly having a wonderful time as an agonized wolf behind him leaves his blood in the snow, suffers and slowly dies. Is, a good many web writers have said, simply tortured to death. A detailed account can be found on the Earth Island site.

“Pinching” (who happens to be a Forest Service employee at Grangeville) remarked of the kill: “No rub spots on the hide, and he will make me a good wall hanger.”

In a followup, the Idaho Statesman‘s Rocky Barker notes that “Idaho Department of Fish and Game official said the trapper broke no laws. The trapper had all of the necessary permits, permission from the landowners and he had participated in the mandatory wolf trapping class, conservation officers found when they investigated. “They couldn’t find that he did anything illegal,” said Mike Keckler, Fish and Game communications chief. Had the trapper followed guidance provided in the trapping class he would not have photographed himself with the live-trapped animal, Keckler said.”

Idahoans may find out what happens when that admonition isn’t followed. Don’t be surprised if the picture goes viral, and begins a visual definition of wolf hunting. A number of wolf hunters may object that they don’t act that way, that they go for a humane kill rather than something like this. But comments from a string of public agencies say that there’s no law against what you see in this picture. So there we are.

Share on Facebook