Writings and observations

National redistricting

This sounds like an idea that must not be new but sure doesn’t seem familiar: Instead of each state redistricting their congressional districts, that work would be done by a national National Commission for Independent Redistricting. Starting, if the legislation were passed, in 2020.

The proposal, by Oregon Representative Earl Blumenauer, will be immediately set upon by the states-rights crowd, but it merits some attention.

Nationally, when it comes to redistricting – for congressional and state legislative lines – there are two kinds of states: commission states and legislature states. Legislature states have the work done by legislatures. (Oregon still does it this way.) Commission states do it by using a special commission; Washington and Idaho do it that way. Generally – Oregon’s smooth experience this cycle notwithstanding – the commission approach seems to yield better results.

So why not a commission on a large scale?? Carefully balanced, it would have the potential to drew lines that weigh less with local political interests, and more with balancing voter rights.

Blumenauer on the measure: “In hallways and back rooms in state capitols across America, politicians are hard at work helping members of Congress pick their voters, so that for the next ten years, it will be harder for voters to pick their politicians. This system divides local communities of interest, resulting in districts that look like a raw egg has been splattered against a wall. It turns districts bright red and bright blue, making it harder to elect representatives with nuanced policies, rewards extremism, and makes it nearly impossible for the members of Congress they elect to reach bipartisan agreement to address our nation’s most urgent needs. This legislation will ensure that Congressional elections are more competitive and fair, and that voters get to choose their representatives. Now is the time to reform the redistricting process and act in a way that reflects broad public interests, rather than narrow and immediate partisanship.”

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