Writings and observations

L87

L87

The adopted map

 

And redistricting in Idaho is, apparently, about done: The commission on Friday adopted a plan, L87, by unanimous vote:

The legalistic requirements seem to be met fairly cleanly: The highest population deviation reported is -5.24%. Not bad.

Looking around the map, a few impressions …

Overall, Democrats should be reasonably happy. They should like the Coeur d’Alene-area, and Moscow and Lewiston-based, districts, which are clearly drawn and surprisingly compact. The Boise-area districts are in generally not bad for them either, and they got mostly what they wanted in the Blaine County and Pocatello areas as well. Some of the Boise-area Democrats were thrown into more problematic districts with a Republican or two (notably the three in District 16). Still, it’s better than they had good reason to expect.

People in the two districts that have generated complaints – the Owyhee/Twin Falls district in the southwest, and the Franklin-Bear Lake-Caribou-Bonneville-Teton district in the southeast – will get less satisfaction, because those districts largely remain in place. We will hear complaints form those quarters that the districts they have disliked (with reason) for the last 10 years will be extended another 10.

In fact, taken as a whole, this map looks a great deal like the current one (and not tremendously like the map proposed by the former outgoing commission). It almost seems as if the commission took a leaf from Oregon, starting with the current map and just tweaking it as necessary.

A large batch of legislators will confirm, though, that it isn’t an exact match: A lot of them were thrown together in districts with more incumbent legislators than available seats. They include the House speaker and majority leader – You can say this about the plan: The powerful got no special protection.

Senate matchups (drawn largely from blog reports of the Spokesman-Review‘s Betsy Russell):

District 1: Sens. Shawn Keough, R-Sandpoint, and Joyce Broadsword, R-Sagle
District 11: Sens. Patti Anne Lodge, R-Huston, and Melinda Smyser, R-Parma
District 16: Sens. John Andreason, R-Boise, and Les Bock, D-Boise
District 20: Sens. Shirley McKague, R-Meridian, and Chuck Winder, R-Boise
District 23: Sens. Bert Brackett, R-Rogerson, and Tim Corder, R-Mountain Home

House:

District 5: Reps. Dick Harwood, R-St. Maries; Shirley Ringo, D-Moscow; and Tom Trail, R-Moscow
District 8: House Speaker Lawerence Denney, Reps. Carlos Bilbao, Judy Boyle, Ken Roberts (assistant majority leader), Steven Thayn
District 14: Reps. Reed DeMordaunt, R-Eagle; Marv Hagedorn, R-Meridian; Mike Moyle, R-Star House Majority Leader)
District 16: Reps. Max Black, R-Boise; Grant Burgoyne, D-Boise; Elfreda Higgins, D-Boise
District 23: Reps. Pete Nielsen, R-Mountain Home; Jim Patrick, R-Twin Falls; and Rich Wills, R-Glenns Ferry
District 24: Reps. Sharon Block, R-Twin Falls; Stephen Hartgen, R-Twin Falls; Leon Smith, R-Twin Falls
District 30: Reps. Janice McGeachin, R-Idaho Falls; Erik Simpson, R-Idaho Falls; Jeff Thompson, R-Idaho Falls

By my count, 33 legislators will be tossed into these uncomfortable spots – just under a third of the legislature. And that means a lot of seats will be open, too.

Odds are, in any event, this is it.

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One Comment

  1. mark said:

    Dramatically different from the previous commission’s maps is the ignoring of Indian reservation boundaries. On its face, a significant diminishing of a community of interest, but given the high proportion of non-Tribal fee land within the reservations, maybe not that big a deal from the demographic perspective. Viewed from the Tribal perspective of a sovereign nation, it is and might be a fatal flaw if taken to court.

    October 16, 2011

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