Writings and observations

Rosellini, with a rose

Rosellini
Albert Rosellini

Albert Rosellini‘s father was a saloon keeper whose business was shut down by the coming of prohibition. He grew up in the Ranier Valley area of south Seattle when it was known as Garlic Gulch because of all the immigrant Italian families there.

Rosellini, who would become governor of Washington for two terms (elected 1956 and 1960, defeated in bids for third terms in 1964 and 1972), lived through some astounding changes before his death Monday at the age of 101. As a political record-setter, there was this: He was the first Catholic elected governor from a state west of the Mississippi.

He was known for a good many things, including his improbable tangential connection to “strippergate” not so many years ago, but probably most significantly to infrastructure (well, that and the Seattle World’s Fair, which he promoted heavily). One of the Puget Sound area’s landmark construction projects, the floating bridge on Lake Washington that links Seattle and Medina via SR 520.

All these years it has been a free-passage bridge. But that would be the same SR 520 on which that is about to change, as the Washington Department of Transportation notes: “Electronic tolling starts in December on the SR 520 bridge to help pay for the construction of a new faster, safer bridge.”

Haven’t seen any commentary from Rosellini on the new tolls. But he undoubtedly had some opinions about a bridge construction that could be done without them a half-century ago … but, apparently, no longer.

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