And in Oregon

census
Population increase in counties/U.S. Census

The Oregon numbers are also out today, and as in Washington there are no huge shocks.

Data for Oregon show that the five most populous incorporated places and their 2010 Census counts are Portland, 583,776; Eugene, 156,185; Salem, 154,637; Gresham, 105,594; and Hillsboro, 91,611. Portland grew by 10.3 percent since the 2000 Census. Eugene grew by 13.3 percent, Salem grew by 12.9 percent, Gresham grew by 17.1 percent, and Hillsboro grew by 30.5 percent.

The largest county is Multnomah, with a population of 735,334. Its population grew by 11.3 percent since 2000. The other counties in the top five include Washington, with a population of 529,710 (increase of 18.9 percent); Clackamas, 375,992 (increase of 11.1 percent); Lane, 351,715 (increase of 8.9 percent); and Marion, 315,335 (increase of 10.7 percent).

Biggest percentage county increase, as you can see, has been in Deschutes, though it’s less than it would have been if the trajectory of the first two-thirds of the last decade had continued. And it remains the seventh most populous county now, same as it was a decade ago.

And in the ongoing contest for second place, Eugene edges out Salem, this time. And barely. Hillsboro continues to be on a strong trajectory for fourth place before long. And while the strong growth in Washington County was surely expected, we’d have thought a higher growth in Clackamas would have been registered. But apparently not.

Oregon was reported a decade ago as 86.6% “white,” but 83.6% now. Hispanic portion was 8% then, and 11.7% now.

A side note. Oregon’s total population was reported as 3,831,074; divide that by five congressional districts, and you get 684,280 each. Washington County’s population is 529,710 is enough to make up most of a whole congressional district. Or this way: If you add the populations of Multnomah and Washington counties and divide the total by two, you get 766,215 – most of what you need for two districts.

NOTE Corrected for final district figures (h/t to a sharp-eyed correspondent).

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