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Posts published in “Day: July 18, 2010”

Dudley’s unfolding problem

dudley
Chris Dudley

The problem is somewhat bigger than it first seemed, and it started as a problem. It has sort of unwrapped, getting more pungent.

If you're Chris Dudley, the Republican nominee for governor of Oregon, your biggest problem is this: You're untested in public - governmental and elective - life, and questions both about how well informed you are and about how you react to various pressure stimuli are real questions voters and the people who advise them on voting will be considering. Dealing with that concern will be a main thread of the upcoming gubernatorial contest with Democrat John Kitzhaber, whose issues are in other areas: He has broad mastery of the subject matter, and his reactions to various challenges have been documented for a long time.

One way Dudley could spike the problem is by going right at it: Putting himself out there, answering questions, providing detail, exposing himself to the pressures so people can watch him in action. If, that is, he would leave a good impression afterward. There's the risk of falling on his face, and avoiding the risk is a way of conceding that those problems people wonder about really are, you know, problems.

So far, Dudley has been practicing avoidance. He has been arguing for fewer (and Kitzhaber more) debates. The traditional first one is the summer newspaper publisher's confab, where since 1986 the party nominees faced off in front of the state's newspaper reporters. Dudley begged off, saying he had a family vacation to tend to instead.

That sounded pretty weak. And the vacation wasn't even in Oregon, also not wonderful.

Then it turned out that while in Colorado, Dudley was not just relaxing with the family. Instead of speaking to newspaper publishers in Oregon, he was at Aspen at a Republican governors' meeting, speaking to the lobbyists and campaign finance people who were there.

As Jeff Mapes of the Oregonian wrote, "When the Dudley campaign declined an offer to debate Kitzhaber before the annual meeting of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association - which has a more than two-decade-old tradition of holding the first gubernatorial debate of the general election campaign - no mention was made that Dudley would be at another political event."

That's not likely to be forgotten. And it raises another dimension to the problem he has to deal with headed into the last three months of the campaign. Kari Chisholm at Blue Oregon outlined it:

"Dudley's now in a position where every time he tells folks that he has a seemingly-legit schedule conflict, they're going to wonder: What's really going on? What's he really doing? This is no longer just an issue about whether Dudley is willing to answer tough questions from the press and for Oregon voters - though it is still that - it's now also a more fundamental issue about his credibility and trustworthiness."

Review: The last of the Indian wars

trahant

Two subjects here. One is the long-time Washington Senator Henry Jackson, one of the most impactful the region has ever had, and his work with one of his staffers, Forrest Gerard - and we should note here that a lot of the work credited to members of Congress actually gets done by staffers, so that's a worthy story on its own merits.

The other is the issue at hand: "Termination," as applied to Indian reservations. As the glossary puts it, termination in the context of Indian reservations means "an end to the special relationship between tribes and the federal government. The idea was to settle claims with tribal governments and then terminate the federal government’s role on reservations. American Indians would then become subject to state laws."

For someone who likes clear and clean lines of government, the federally-recognized tribes and their reservations are an inconvenience. They fit nowhere in the nation's federal system, but they're not - terms of language notwithstanding - realistically independent nations either. (Independent nations controlled by a bureau of the federal government?) A wide range of people have bought into the idea of termination over the years. Of course, if that approach had become law, Indian country would look a lot different now, and surely a lot less prosperous.

Once, Jackson was one of them. He changed his mind, and his work with Gerrard was one of the key levers in that change.

So the new book Last Great Battle of the Indian Wars, written by former Seattle Post-Intelligencer Editorial Page Editor Mark Trahant (and, much further back, former Sho-Ban News editor), tells a story about how a policy - against termination - came to be put in place after an unsteady run through the years, and a story about how Washington works. It's a solid slice of political storytelling.

It isn't an entirely dispassionate look at the subject; Trahant is clearly anti-termination. His argument, and compelling, is that ending the federal relationship with the tribes would effectively end their governing structure, and over time - maybe not long time - that would effectively destroy the tribes and native culture. Now, he writes that tribal self-government "is no longer in question. Every tribe, state and federal leader now accepts that framework as a given."

Wasn't always that way. Trahant recounts how Congress formally adopted a termination resolution in 1958.

Jackson is one of the main personal reasons for that transition, along with Gerard. For those of us who don't track Indian issues in Congress closely, it's an obscure story. This book shows why it should not be.