Archive for June, 2010

Jun 21 2010

The outsourced speech

Published by under Idaho

Plagiarism is easier to detect these days than it once was, what with search engines and even web sites designed to match texts. KTVB-TV in Boise did a fine job of using that technology to take one more look at the controversial case of the congressional announcement speech by Vaughn Ward, who lost the Republican primary last month in Idaho’s 1st district.

The original controversy centered on the similarity of a relatively few lines in the speech to one several years ago by Barack Obama. But much more of it, apparently, comes wholesale from a speech by a Republican Pennsylvania congressional candidate. Asked about the speech, Ward’s former campaign manager said the speech was “outsourced.”

Like a college kid buying a term paper? So it would seem. Maybe there’s something to this call for “authenticity” in politics.

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Jun 21 2010

This week in the Digests

Published by under Digests

digest
weekly Digest

Business and economic news dominated our Washington, Idaho and Oregon Public Affairs Digests this week, as unemployment statistics and employee pay numbers stabilizing or jogged upward. Another significant piece of news for Northwest transportation and economic development: Major changes in air routes for Horizon Airlines, with significant cuts in a number of the smaller Northwest markets they serve.

There were significant legal decisions, including one in Oregon relating to medical marijuana users who seek concealed weapons permits; in Idaho, a legislator is considering introducing a medical marijuana bill in the 2011 session. Idaho also reports meth use down.

As a reminder: We’re now publishing weekly editions of the Public Affairs Digests – for Idaho, Washington and Oregon – moving from a monthly to a weekly rundown of what’s happening. And we’re taking it all-electronic: The print edition will be moving to e-mail.

That means we can include more information, and get it out a lot faster: The weekly Digests will be in your in-box first thing Monday morning. If you subscribe, of course: That’s $59 a year, for 50 issues and the yearbook. Yes, including the yearbook. The Idaho Yearbook, which we published for years up to 2002, will return early in 2011 – in printed book form – and Digest subscribers get it for free with their subscription. And the Oregon and Washington yearbooks will be coming out at the same time.

If you’d like to take a look at one of the new weekly Digests, here’s a link to the Idaho edition, to the Oregon edition and to the Washington edition. If you’d like to subscribe, here are the links (through to PayPal) for Idaho, for Oregon and for Washington.

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Jun 20 2010

A place for Cashmere

Published by under Washington

world
Cashmere World site

File this in the efforts-at-new-news-media directory . . .

Around the Northwest, there are several web sites aimed at becoming news web sites for local communities that once but no longer have print newspapers. Orting, Washington and Shoshone, Idaho are two that come to mind.

These have been sprouted by local people, sometimes those displaced by the closing of the local paper. But now comes one backed and sponsored by a daily newspaper, aimed at one of its readership-area, nearby communities.

The paper is the Wenatchee World, and the site is the Cashmere World; the town of Cashmere is about eight miles northwest of Wenatchee. It’s not a blog; it’s more like a newspaper web site. There are news stories, conventional stories, mainly on business and sports.

The paper describes it roughly: “This pilot project is Cashmere’s new community website, with the aim of helping Cashmere residents develop their own news and features about their town, their schools, their individuals and businesses. We have been discussing this with community members for some time, and held a training session for the writing of news. This program is not intended for bloggers’ comments.”

Will it work out and provide a model for other papers?

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Jun 19 2010

Huffman on BP

Published by under Oregon

huffman
Jim Huffman

You’d think you’d want to pause for just a moment before jumping to the defense, these days, of British Petroleum. But Oregon Senate candidate Jim Huffman, the Republican nominee (against incumbent Democrat Ron Wyden), does just that. (Hat tip here to Blue Oregon.)

In a report in the Medford Mail Tribune, Huffman said that the federal government ought not be “a dominant player in our lives,” and beyond that “the federal government can’t solve any problem.”

And: “Funding bike paths, taking over General Motors and telling BP to pony up $20 billion to a fund that the president will hand out — these don’t fit the enumerated powers of the government in the Constitution.”

So if a BP virtually destroys vast stretches of our common property, just who is it that should deal with the situation? And is he really arguing that the federal government never has solved a problem – that it cannot? If that’s the case, why is he bothering running for office in an organization so completely pernicious when it’s not ineffective? Why waste your time?

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Jun 18 2010

Friends of BP

Published by under Northwest

Curious at all about who in the Northwest political sphere that British Petroleum – they of the endless Gulf oil spout – consider their friends?

You can probably make some assessment through looking at whose campaigns they have contributed to.

In the current cycle, according to the invaluable Open Secrets.org: Doc Hastings, R-WA6 ($1,000); Rick Larsen, D-WA2 ($1,000); Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-WA5 ($1,000); Greg Walden, R-OR2 ($1,000).

In the 2008 cycle, you get these: Larsen ($2,000), McMorris Rodgers ($1,000), Walden ($1,000), Jay Inslee, D-WA1 ($1,000), and former Oregon Senator Gordon Smith ($2,000). No one in the Idaho delegation in either cycle.

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Jun 18 2010

Rossi’s semi-campaign

Published by under Washington

The Seattle Times questioning whether Dino Rossi is really even interested in the Senate campaign? It did in an article today, following up with this:

“Since declaring his candidacy May 27, Rossi has scheduled few press events, skipped some chances to debate his GOP rivals and kept his campaign web site practically devoid of content. Meanwhile, he has found time to speak at real-estate seminars teaching investors how to make a profit off buying and selling foreclosures.”

That latter point has been happily seized on by Democrats, and may have left some Republicans wondering – why would he do it? Why go so far out of your way to deliver the opposition a talking point?

Another point in the article, about Rossi’s no-showing at events this season aimed at Republicans, may be more telling.

One such event is slated for this evening, directed toward Tea Party enthusiasts and other conservatives, and is expected to draw the other two significant Republican contenders, Clint Didier and Paul Akers. Rossi’s response to his nonappearances has run like this: “There is no Republican primary. There is no Democratic primary any more. It’s been wiped out,” Rossi said. “I would like to be in situations where I can compare and contrast with Patty Murray.”

On a formal level Rossi is, of course, correct: The August primary will not decide party nominees, only a top two, and Rossi is highly likely to clear that bar.

On a more pragmatic level, though, Rossi seems to be kissing off the people in his own party – the most activist segment of it – who have been arguing that people like Didier or Akers are the real conservatives and Rossi just an establishment RINO. Rossi will need those activists in November, more than he will in August, and he’s not been laying down much ground work for developing them into a loyal base. Call that a factor in the eventual Murray-Rossi contest.

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Jun 17 2010

How much a race in OR 1?

Published by under Oregon

So is the race in Oregon’s House 1, between incumbent Democrat David Wu and Republican Rob Cornilles, heating up?

Chris Cillizza’s Fix at Washington Post certainly advances the possibility: “Oregon Democratic Rep. David Wu is among the more unlikely GOP targets but a new internal poll for his opponent’s campaign suggests he might be in a real face this fall. Wu takes 46 percent to 40 percent for sports business consultant Rob Cornilles in the Moore Information survey, which was obtained by the Fix …”

Obtained, presumably, from the Republican sources Cornilles’ campaign is closely tied to. Cornilles, unlike some other Republican primary contenders around the country (see Vaughn Ward in Idaho, for example) was very much the preferred choice of the national Republican establishment, and he has a solid campaign staff (including some Oregon-experienced staff) with significant Beltway links. For a Cornilles-run internal poll (which it was) to take substantial mention in the Post or National Journal isn’t especially unusual. (It does indicate a campaign staff alert to pushing all the buttons it can.)

That said, the results in themselves should be treated, as intentionally released campaign-generated numbers always ought to be, with deep caution. The sense here is that Cornilles is further back than he seems to be; Wu has for a decade now been regularly described an advance of elections as more vulnerable than he turns out to be, even in years of bad headlines, which this one isn’t. The appearance of the numbers, though, does say this: The Cornilles people are working, and if a large enough anti-incumbency opening does appear, they’re positioning themselves to take advantage of it.

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Jun 16 2010

Comings and goings

Published by under Northwest

A great resource for visualizing where people in the Northwest are coming from and where they’re going: A map on Forbes.com generated from Internal Revenue Service Data. county by county, it shows where people around the country are arriving from, and where they’re headed.

Click on Multnomah County, and you can see where people in Portland are coming from (mainly California and the Washington/New York pole), if you can work through the heavy run of stats (represented here by black and red lines). But some of the most interesting bits are in the smaller counties. Idaho County, Idaho, for example, sends people to other nearby rural counties but draws them from more urban places, notably the Boise area.

Lots to play with here. (Hat tip to Jack Bog’s Blog.)

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Jun 16 2010

“He did nothing wrong”

Published by under Washington

Not entirely by way of defense of the two women who were not behaving ideally in their interaction with a Seattle police officer . . . but is this really what a Seattle police union rep really ought to be suggesting about the officer in this incident – wherein he slugged an apparently unarmed woman – in this video:

“He did nothing wrong. If anything, I think he maybe waited a little too long to engage in force because I think he was trying to defuse the situation and calm people down . . .”

Seattle is lucky a riot didn’t erupt then and there. Historically, riots have been sparks by just such incidents . . . even when not caught on video.

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Jun 16 2010

Felon on the run

Published by under Washington

<br />
Miller
Jesse Miller

Meet a new (since last month) state House candidate in District 29 in Tacoma, Jesse Miller, a civic activist, at Olympia and locally, working behalf of the poor. She is outspoken about racism. She runs a business, albeit one unusual for a legislative candidate: A rap record label called Felony Entertainment. Her roster of community activism – a lengthy list – includes Social Justice Fund-Leaders Under 40, Chair of the Board for Statewide Poverty Action Network 2004-2008, Springbrook Project 2008-, member of Black Collective, The Matrons Club, Praxis Project, Vote For A Change Campaign, Accessing The American Dream Project, Hip Hop Pioneer.

And one more thing, in no way being hidden by the candidate: About 15 years ago she was convicted on a drug charge (cocaine delivery) and served two years in prison. She’s fulfilled all her obligations but, as the Felony Entertainment site quotes her: “’I found my options were slim,’ she said, noting employment offers were limited to flipping burgers and other minimum wage jobs. ‘That felony conviction followed me around’.”

The district is pretty solidly Democratic, but this is a very edgy candidate for the Democrats anywhere in Washington, no?

Well no. She’s running as a Republican, challenging incumbent Democrat Steve Kirby, who actually was supportive of some of Miller’s proposals last term. (Miller has an interesting runthrough about the party choice on her Facebook page.)

A 2009 law opened the door to voting and even running for office for people who have a felony conviction in their background. Not everyone supported it; Representative Christopher Hurst (a Democrat, and a police detective) told the Tacoma News Tribune that a felony conviction “should be a lifetime disqualifier . . . There are plenty of other people who could run for public office.”

There are, but the kinds of people who wind up in most legislatures tend to be . . . a lot alike. And if a person has gone through the strenuous process of societal repayment, has stayed clean and is up front about the record – why exactly should the citizen be denied the run, and the voters given the option? The point of having a lot of people in a legislature – 147 in Washington’s case – is to collect a wide range of experiences, and people who have responded (hopefully successfully) in various ways.

A lot of material for discussion here.

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Jun 15 2010

Green prisons

Published by under Oregon

Of interest: Oregon’s prisons are moving toward solar energy.

It doesn’t seem an obvious fit, but it apparently can work. In this high-priced arena, significant energy costs at a few of the facilities already have been trimmed back. The Two Rivers Correctional at Umatilla has has a good enough experience with it that others are now sending out requests for bids.

One more thing in a prison system that isn’t reliant on an external network. There could even be a security advantage in that.

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Jun 14 2010

This week in the PADs

Published by under Digests

digest
weekly Digest

This week’s Oregon, Idaho and Washington Public Affairs Digests are out, political news continues regionally as Washington Republicans hold their convention in Vancouver and the Idaho 1st district contest continues to take shape.

There are also reviews of the Oregon state government 9% solution, school closures in Portland and elsewhere, the shift of Boise State University athletics to the Mountain West Conference, new filings in the Lowe court case, the dispute over trust lands in the Okanogan territory and much more.

As a reminder: We’re now publishing weekly editions of the Public Affairs Digests – for Idaho, Washington and Oregon – moving from a monthly to a weekly rundown of what’s happening. And we’re taking it all-electronic: The print edition will be moving to e-mail.

That means we can include more information, and get it out a lot faster: The weekly Digests will be in your in-box first thing Monday morning. If you subscribe, of course: That’s $59 a year, for 50 issues and the yearbook. Yes, including the yearbook. The Idaho Yearbook, which we published for years up to 2002, will return early in 2011 – in printed book form – and Digest subscribers get it for free with their subscription. And the Oregon and Washington yearbooks will be coming out at the same time.

If you’d like to take a look at one of the new weekly Digests, here’s a link to the Idaho edition, to the Oregon edition and to the Washington edition. If you’d like to subscribe, here are the links (through to PayPal) for Idaho, for Oregon and for Washington.

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Jun 13 2010

The familiarity of Nadine

Published by under Washington

A fine Spokesman-Review piece today about local television, especially local television news, through the lens of Nadine Woodward.

Woodward was on-air at Spokane’s KREM television for 19 years before, last year, running into a conflict with management, and ultimately leaving the station. The departure was acrimonious, and involved allegation of age and gender discrimination, and was a visible case in the community.

She was in any event not out of work for long, signing on with competing KXLY. And KXLY quickly launched what was described as the biggest promotional campaign any Spokane station has undertaken to promote a specific personality. KXLY has material to work with, since Woodward was already well known around Spokane. From the story: ” Since March, when Nadine Woodward started her new job, her 18-year-old son Connor complained he couldn’t avoid her, even miles from home. On his way to school he’d see some of the 20 large billboards filled with her smiling face, part of a media blitz calling attention to her new position at Spokane broadcaster KXLY.”

A good look inside local TV as it’s practiced.

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Jun 12 2010

Non-establishment tea

Published by under Washington

At the Washington Republican Convention at Vancouver, it’s the establishment over here, and the Tea Party people over there. The twain meet only erratically, it seems.

This might, in theory, have been a moment for unification and coming together, notably in the Senate campaign which features – as the two apparent leaders – former gubernatorial candidate Dino Rossi and former football player Clint Didier. Rossi was the hard-get for the establishment, the guy people in both Washingtons’ Republican leadership council wanted as standard bearer against Democrat Patty Murray. Didier is the Tea Party guy, matching up well in mood and rhetoric to what they’re looking for. He even interrupted his weekend for a quick meeting with former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin, who may have ticked off Tea Party people elsewhere but still seems in good graces among those in Washington.

So the Tea Party appeared, according to a range of accounts, to be much more happy with Didier. And when both major candidates spoke to the Tea people, you get things like this (as reported in the Everett Herald):

Where Rossi avoided direct answers to most of the questions, Didier didn’t, and his answers were what they wanted to hear.

For example, on whether each backed Arizona’s controversial law dealing with immigrants, Rossi responded that the nation needs a “tall fence and high gate” to deal with those crossing into the country illegally.

Didier simply said, “Yes ma’am, I am 100 percent behind it.”

The Washington primary election won’t, of course, result in a party nominee – just two candidates who go on to November. Those two, presumably, will be Murray and Rossi. What it won’t do is give closure to some of the Didier people who may wonder how many non-Republicans, or RINOs, sent Rossi on his way to the fall.

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Jun 12 2010

Hart on and in taxes

Published by under Idaho

The story this last week about state Representative Phil Hart, R-Athol, being slapped with $300,000 in tax liens (from 1997-2003 and two more recent years) almost slipped by – people get into financial arrears, on a basic level there’s nothing shocking there – except for a few points that should be noted before this slips away.

One is that Hart is quite influential among very conservative Republicans; in the Panhandle, he’s among the must-get endorsements if you’re running with Tea Party and other very ideological conservatives. He has become influential enough that he was a key lever behind the ouster of incumbent Republican Senator Mike Jorgenson, from his district, by Steve Vick; the extent of Hart’s involvement has been a matter of some dispute, but he apparently recruited Vick to run. In a contested open-seat race in the other House seat in the district, Vito Barbieri, a Hart ally, won the race. He has a power base in Kootenai County; he’s one of the real influentials in that area.

This should be noted too: Hart is a member of the House Revenue & Taxation Committee, the key locus for tax policy in Idaho.

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