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Posts published in April 2009

Bremerton v Seattle

bozeman

Cary Bozeman

Was in Bremerton last night, having dinner with a friend at Anthony's, which is right on the waterfront. A great view from there, but getting to Anthony's wasn't easy: Strategic parts of downtown Bremerton seem to be torn up to street repair, and there's a very concrete feel to a lot of what ought to be one of the city's major attractions.

And there's the matter of mediocre road signage in the Bremerton area, but we'll let that go.

Given that, Bremerton Mayor Cary Bozeman's recent hashing of Seattle's waterfront, and his recommendation that others do as Bremerton has done . . . well . . .

MORE ON BOZEMAN All right, this may have been a little unfair, because Bozeman has been something of a dynamo at Bremerton (probably more, in context, than Greg Nickels at Seattle). Tom Menzel, who lives not far from Bremerton (thursday night's dinner partner) offers this thought:

By the way, I meant to mention a political superstar who hangs around in Bremerton -- Mayor Cary Bozeman. This guy has been kicking ass and taking names in Bremerton for several years now. He is boldly taking a crappy town with no identity or direction into the 21st century. The guy is amazing. Everything you saw on the waterfront was due to his hard work and persistence. I wish you could have seen that area 5 or 6 years ago. It was a horrible disaster. Nearly all retail left downtown years ago for the mongo mall in Silverdale, leaving downtown in wretched shape. Since I had such a great experience working on downtown Boise redevelopment years ago, I have a real affinity for this guy.

Seattle, the cheaper alternative to Tacoma?

Any time a local paper reaches the conclusion that an important local business is likely to move away, that falls into man-bites-dog territory. But there's another bit more remarkable yet in today's story by Tacoma News Tribune reporter Dan Voelpel on the strategic planning, and potential move, of Tacoma's Russell Investments.

Russell is an unusual, maybe one of a kind thing in the Northwest - an investment company that is also a big employer, a direct major force in a local city's economy: Its employment base was 1,100 just at Tacoma, and it has offices around the globe. Note the "was", because the macro economy has led to scalebacks here too, by about 200 employees, a real hit at Tacoma.

But there could be more. Voelpel looked at the physical space and growth (or contraction) considerations Russell will have to be dealing with in the next few years, especially in the period right around 2013. Once-discussed plans for a Tacoma Russell tower probably have evaporated. But there was also this:

"In Seattle today, you can find a glut of vacant office space that could suit Russell’s needs and cost far less than paying the lease on a newly constructed office building. Most prominent of Seattle’s buildings? The former WaMu Center, a 55-story, 1.1 million-square-foot behemoth that became available with the demise of Washington Mutual Bank last year."

The bill parade

spring

Spring in Olympia, with actual sun/Stapilus

Olympia looked and felt like springtime today, which carried implications inside the legislative building (the Statehouse) - a reminder to everyone that the carriage turns into a pumpkin in only a few days. And there seems to be no certainty as to whether the work will be completed by then.

Those big-discussion matters are mainly financial, but piles of other pieces of legislation have been making their way through. This afternoon we took the 3:30 governor's bill signings, which offered a sense of some of the day-in, day-out aspects of this, at a very real choke point: The signature of the governor is a point at which mere legislation turns into actual law.

The way it happens is this. Governor Chris Gregoire sits at the end of a long table in a largish conference room in the governor's suit of offices, in front of a stack of bills and a box of black pens. Helping are a staffer or two; a photographer at the far end of the table shoots the signings. A bill number is called out, and a group of people in the lobby outside (often including bill sponsors and people who worked on the measure) are escorted in for the event; the governor briefly describes the bill and why it should become law, she signs, and the picture of all is taken. They then leave through the other end of the room, and the next group comes in.

It sounds a little factory-like, but there are a couple of mitigators. One that Gregoire projects friendliness and courtesy (seems to work better for her in person than on television), and everyone got some attention. The other is that, well, the bills have to be dealt with quickly. Washington requires the governor act on bills within five days (that includes Saturdays and Sundays) after final passage during the session, and when the bills fly out, they pile up.

So there were 16 bill signings on Thursday, in somewhat over a half hour (going a little faster than usual) and odds are that none will make for any big headlines. SB 5305 repeals obsolete language in the state retirement law. SB 5322 concerned civil service commissions for sheriff's offices. SB 5343 had to do with the regulation of accountants. (How's that for excitement? But someone has to deal with all this.)

One bill stuck out: SB 5284, "relating to truth in music advertising." More fully: "Creates the truth in music advertising act. Prohibits a person from advertising or conducting a live musical performance or production through the use of a false, deceptive, or misleading affiliation, connection, or association between a performing unless certain conditions are met."

Meaning? Suppose you see an ad for a concert by a famous music group, you buy a ticket, and then discover that it wasn't the original group, it's someone else performing their material, possibly using the original group's name. The bill wouldn't ban the concern but it would allow a promoter to sell tickets only if he made clear who and what the performing group actually was. (You can probably guess where the bill came from.) A consumer protection measure, in other words.

Signed off by the governor on Thursday. And spring rolls on . . .

Bailout numbers

The number of banks in the Northwest getting bailout (TARP) money keeps on rising. Here's the latest, according to ProPublica:

Washington: 15 banks.

Oregon: 3 banks.

Idaho: 4 banks.

The gay marriage referendum

The Washington Legislature's passage today of Senate Bill 5688, the revised domestic partnership act - revisions that provide same-sex couples virtually all of the legal status of marriage except that formal description - was not close, though it was partisan, splitting pretty much along party lines. And the aftermath is as predictable: A push for a referendum, to try to overturn the law at the ballot box.

The core national analysis has been that public attitudes on same-sex marriage have been shifting, in increments, gradually becoming more accepting of them. The question mark seems to be the timetable. Oregon gay-rights activists seem to have mapped that transition carefully, deciding to pass on 2010 for an attempt to overturn the 2004 constitutional amendment banning gay marriage. Their thinking clearly is that a little more time is likely to improve their odds of success, and they're probably right.

However, the Washington referendum - which will have to content itself with settling for complaining about specific provisions, rather than an up-or-down on "gay marriage" - is likely to do two other things, whatever the results (and assuming the proponents succeed in getting it to the ballot, which may not be a foregone conclusion).

First, it effectively inoculates the legislators who voted for it. If the referendum to kill the new law fails, that means the legislators were on the popular side, If it does kill the new law, the beast is dead anyway and no one will care next year.

Second, it will provide a new, reasonably clear measure of how people are feeling about this now.

Where will that go? The Slog today quotes one referendum organizer as saying, “We are taking a statewide poll this week. We’ll make the poll public when we get it, unless it’s so ugly that I don’t want to tell anybody.”

That they're holding out that possibility may have some significance.

The Salem to Vancouver rail line?

What was striking, sitting in the Oregon House Sustainability & Economic Development Committee session this afternoon, was the matter of factness around a pretty big idea: Extending a commuter rail line from the Portland metro area to Salem.

There is, of course, sometime to work with already on the northern reach: The tri-county MAX rail system, together with a recently-opened add-on, already runs not just from Hillsboro to Gresham but also south to Wilsonville, a big chunk of the way to Salem. There are also plans, in conjunction with planning for the upgrade to the Columbia River I-5 bridge, to extend commuter rail north through to Vancouver, where it could easily be strung in parallel to the Mill Plain crossway.

So now imagine a connector linking to the south, running through communities large and small (Donald might be a stop, or at least slow-down point) on existing tracks. The significant number of people commuting or running back and forth between Portland and Salem could train it. (Especially if they start loading in wi fi throughout the system.)

It's a big project at a time when big new projects aren't much in fashion. House Bill 2408, which has a substantial bipartisan group of sponsors, doesn't authorize the line, but it does create a task force on it and will wrap up a study on the idea, due out this fall.

Representative Paul Holvey, D-Eugene, said "I'm not famliar with Donald" (well, most people a few miles from it aren't), and said it was a shame the 4th congressional district wasn't included. But he'd support the study anyway.

We know of at least one legislative staffer (and there are doubtless others) who commutes from Eugene to Salem. Give it a little time, and Eugene might make the line yet.

Digging in

symms

Steve Symms

Idaho Representative Walt Minnick - the Democrat elected last year in one of the most Republican House districts in America - just keeps on strengthening his position.

This latest had to be mind-bender for a lot of people: A fundraiser for Minnick, in Washington, headlined by none other than former Senator Steve Symms (1981-93), now a lobbyist in DC.

Symms is in no conceivable sense a liberal or moderate Republican, and as if to underline that, he was the guy who ousted veteran Democratic Senator Frank Church back in 1980. He campaigned alongside Ronald Reagan and was very much of a piece with the big Reagan win that year. He has never suggested, never indicated, any kind of philosophical mind change.

For whatever reason - could the realities of lobbying in Washington in 2009 have something to do with it? or maybe Minnick's own philosophical demeanor - he is fundraising for Minnick. This may be (someone offer a correction if needed) the first ever Democrat that Symms has publicly supported in any significant way.

There may be a reason Republican opposition to Minnick isn't coalescing very quickly yet.

A long way around

bridge

Hood Canal Bridge/WADOT road cam

You see some effort on some of the really big projects, but you have to wonder how much effort is made by transportation construction planners to evaluate the impact their projects will have on people who need to, you know, drive there.

Here's one out of the way for most Northwesterners but a very big deal locally: The Hood Canal Bridge in Washington, which connects the Kitsap Peninsula with the Olympic Peninsula. People who live or work or simply need to travel between the Bremerton-Poulsbo region to the east or the Port Angeles-Sequim-Port Townsend area to the west, use the bridge a lot, and so does a good deal of commercial traffic. There's a contingent who live on one side of the bridge, and work on the other.

The bridge is something of a choke point. If you want to drive from one peninsula to the other, you can do it, but the shortest route will take you two hours. (A pretty drive, but not a pretty commute.) There are ferries, but their capacity is limited, and the could be real time-munchers when relied on regularly.

The bridge needs repairs. The last time we crossed it, about three years ago, the need seemed to be there just in listening to the bumpy road. The repair is a long-running project, but as part of it, the bridge will be closed to traffic for about six weeks, starting beginning of next month.

So what are commuters and others to do? The Kitsap Sun surveyed a bunch of people, and found widely varied reactions. One commuter suggested she may try camping on the work side of the bridge, rather than face the other options.

bridge

/WADOT

The question is how well the Washington Department of Transportation evaluated all this, and the options that are going to be available to drivers, for that six-week stretch?

The WADOT Hood River Bridge web site does suggest some options. One is "drive around," which would be okay but vacationers, not so wonderful (because of the 2-hour time) for most others. There is a free water shuttle, a ferry of sorts, with 30-minute departure times, which looks like a feasable option; maybe. Then there's a temporary Port Townsend-Edmonds ferry, for the traffic headed to or from the Seattle area; but that would bypass the Kitsap area and be really time-intensive.

Maybe there are no perfect answers. But the thought process would be enlightening.

Tea parties, then and now

Jeff Kropf

The Boston Tea Party, 1846 Nathan Currier depiction

The 1773 incident now known as the Boston Tea Party was a truly spontaneous demonstration of immediate anger. It stemmed from the imposition of a royal tax on the tea, and was the result of a situation specific to Boston. Taxable tea was arriving from Britain in all 13 American colonies, but in the other 12 colonies protesters sent the tea on a return trip with their visible protests alone. It was a less simple matter in Boston, where the governor of Massachusetts had an insider business arrangement with the providers (two of them were his sons). And so a standoff. A meeting to consider options was called by the rabble-rouser Sam Adams, and in the midst of it some of the fed-up simply stalked out and (there are differing reports over how many were actually dressed as Indians) boarded the ship and tossed the tea into the harbor.

Some contrast with what's happening in terms of current "tea parties," aimed as criticism of the Obama Administration's financial policies, is worth a note. A string of tea party events are scheduled - for the 15th, of course - in Idaho (Boise, Coeur d'Alene, Council, Idaho Falls, Pocatello, Priest River, Rexburg and Twin Falls), in Oregon (Astoria, Beaverton, Bend, Coos Bay, Corvallis, The Dalles, Enterprise, Springfield, Forest Grove, Grants Pass, Klamath Falls, La Grande, McMinnville, Medford, Milton Freewater, Newport, Oregon City, Portland, Reedsport, Rogue Riven, Roseburg, Salem, Tillamook) and in Washington (Anacortes, Bellevue, Bellingham, Colville, Everett, Grays Harbor, Issaquah, Kennewick, Moses Lake, Mount Vernon, Oak Harbor, Okanogan, Port Orchard, Pullman, Olympia, Shelton, Tacoma, Port Angeles, Redmond, Seattle, Spokane and Yakima).

That's a lot of scheduled spontaneity.

Some of what's happening is coming out of conservative blogs and networking. But there's a good deal more going here.

The central Tax Day Tea Party web site is well equipped with Resources, Media/Press, Team Wiki, Media Wiki, Social Networking and Store functions. Someone centrally put this up and organized rapidly and at considerable cost.

It turns out to be a lobbying astroturf project of Freedom Works and Americans for Prosperity. The liberal site Think Progress pointed out how

– Freedom Works staffers coordinate conference calls among protesters, contacting conservative activists to give them “sign ideas, sample press releases, and a map of events around the country.”

– Freedom Works staffers apparently moved to “take over” the planning of local events in Florida.

– Freedom Works provides how-to guides for delivering a “clear message” to the public and media.

– Freedom Works has several domain addresses — some of them made to look like they were set up by amateurs — to promote the protests.

– Americans for Prosperity is writing press releases and planning the events in New Jersey, Arizona, New Hampshire, Missouri, Kansas, and several other states.

Freedom Works was "founded in 1984 and described as a 501c4 "grassroots organization," is chaired by former U.S. House Majority Leader Dick Armey. . . . FreedomWorks was formed in 2004 when Citizens for a Sound Economy merged with Empower America." It has worked on a number of policy matters, notably on Social Security, closely with the former Bush Administration.

There's nothing wrong with any of this - free speech is everyone's right, and everyone has the responsibility to protest government actions they disapprove of - but the parties shouldn't be described (as they are in some quarters) as an uprising from below. That would be a significant mischaracterization.

Side note: A distinction of core message. The message behind the first was, "No taxation without representation." Today, we pretty much have the "representation" part covered, which leaves the new message a tad unfocused. (The national tea party site doesn't focus on a specific message; the words on its core graphic are, "Silent Majority No More." That may give a clue as to the point and purpose.)

Foreclosure patterns

The Puget Sound Business Journal this week pulled together a large take-out on foreclosures around King County, and used the statistics on foreclosures to map the areas around King where foreclosures were especially high or low.

High? Maple Valley and Tukwila, notably high-growth areas over the last decade. The highest concentrations of foreclosures in the county, in fact, run roughly in the south-county triangle between those communities and Federal Way. Seattle itself? Less so; and most of the really rural areas in east-county aren't especially foreclosure hotbeds either.

These are mostly new houses.

Amtrak hopes

In the southern Idaho-eastern Oregon area there's been hope, for a long time, of restoration of the old Pioneer trim passenger line on Amtrak. It's been a distant hope, even as legislators such as Idaho Senator Mike Crapo have pushed for it. But now comes a sign that maybe, possibly, it might happen.

Financially, the line was a loser ($20 million a year) when it was shuttered in 1996. But times are changing, and prospects - especially in the new economic-political environment - are changing. Last year Congress ordered a rethink on passenger lines in Amtrak, and the Associated Press is reporting now that Pioneer is currently under evaluation.

Cards and letters time.

The fork in the outlet

Otter

Butch Otter

Title of this post refers, as viewers of "Lost" may recognize, is the nickname assigned by its producers to the upcoming season-ending big deal. It also may apply to the immediate situation at the Idaho Statehouse.

Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter allowed today as how he's frustrated by the legislature, and he has ample reason. (And this week's are far from his first frustrations.) As the Idaho Statesman pointed out, "On Thursday alone, various parts of the Legislature rejected some of his plans on transportation funding, and on spending federal stimulus money."

There is the possibility, albeit a thin one, that the legislature could wrap up business by the end of next week. Another week or even two would be a better bet. But they could be in session a lot longer, because Otter could keep them there. A key quote from the governor: "All you've got to do is look back, if you've got any historical memory. There's lots of things the governor can do."

You don't have to reach back especially far, either, just to 2003. That year, the legislature kept rejecting transportation plans offered by Governor Dirk Kempthorne (does this sound familiar?). Kempthorne couldn't force them to pass them. But he could veto budget bills, as he did in an eight-pack one memorable day, and budget resolution is the one significant thing the legislature has to do before leaving town. The two sides endured an angry standoff for weeks, until after 118 days on May 3, the legislators finally caved.

Otter could do something similar. Its not something anyone really wants. But his comments today leave no doubt: It's on the table. Message to legislators: Don't buy any non-refundable plane tickets any time soon.