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Felony protection

Hart

Phil Hart

Idaho House Bill 139 may not be going anywhere; since it was introduced on February 16 it has stayed in the House Resources & Conservation Committee. But you have to wonder how thoroughly Representative Phil Hart, R-Athol, thought this throught before he had it introduced:

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, at such time as the Canadiangray wolf population exceeds one hundred fifty percent (150%) of the population objectives identified in the wolf conservation and management plan for the state of Idaho, according to statistics maintained by the Idaho department of fish and game, and a Canadian gray wolf causes the death of a person within the state of Idaho, any person who protects Canadian gray wolves shall be guilty of a felony, punishable by imprisonment in the state prison not exceeding five (5) years, or by fine not exceeding fifty thousand dollars ($50,000), or by both such fine and imprisonment.

That’s the full substantive text. The official purpose is noted as, “The purpose of this legislation is to identify which individual or individuals are to be held responsible for criminal prosecution should a Canadian gray wolf kill a person.”

So . . . it would be a felony to protect a wolf that has killed a person . . . or to protect wolves as a group? Would that include making felons of environmental activists who debate the law or regulation on the subject? The bill doesn’t include any definitions.

Explaining (to some extent) in Res & Con, Hart said that “this
proposed legislation deals with wolves and will hold people accountable for wolf attacks under the wolf management plan. He reported that people who live in rural areas have been denied these rights. . . . In the discussion on the motion, Rep. Hart responded to a question regarding records of wolf attacks on people in Idaho. He explained that studies have been done in other areas and the criteria is rigid and an eye witness is required to report a killing.”

Obviously a major problem. According to WikiAnswers.com: “Actually, there have been NO documented killings by wolves. Like any large carnivore, they deffinately have the means to kill a human… they can bring down moose. Usually, though, they like to stay away from humans as much as possible except for occasionally killing livestock.” If anyone does know of a documented instance, let us know . . .

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