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Posts published in “Day: January 21, 2009”

Remaking Springfield

In September we posted on a Eugene Register-Guard article noting the number of larger strip clubs in Springfield than in neighboring, and much larger, Eugene, a piece speculating on how the cities' different histories and social attitudes may have led to the disparity.

A guest op in the R-G today carries some of that forward, in the current debate over a proposal to open a new strip club in the downtown area.

Twenty years ago, The Register-Guard published an article with a headline that was something like “100 Best Things About Springfield,” and one of the highlights was “the real blue- collar bars downtown.” Ten years ago, maybe only five years ago, Dugger could have opened Shaker’s downtown and there would have been little outcry. What’s changed is that many in Springfield now have higher expectations of what they want their downtown to be.

They want to take families downtown after dark and feel safe anywhere from 10th Street to the Willamette River. They want nice places to shop and eat. They want to see their Academy of Arts & Academics students in a play at the Wildish Theater and get a fudge sundae after the show. They want to visit the Springfield Museum or take in an exhibit at the Emerald Art Center and have a nice glass of wine before or after. They want well-lighted streets with windowed storefronts to see what’s going on inside.

They don’t want to feel as though they have to cross the street to avoid a long, dark, uninviting block or a cluster of unsavory characters.

Dugger’s plans may have fit in the old downtown Springfield, but not in the new one — and that’s why so many showed up at the City Council meeting. To him, this is about his right to make a living with a legal strip club; to many others, this is about whose downtown it is and what kind of businesses they want to see there.

Adams’ survivability

Sam Adams

Sam Adams

Our first take on the scandal storm surrounding Portland Mayor Sam Adams (now a national story) was that it was significant but probably survivable, on grounds that his actions has no involvement with the handling of his current office. There also seemed to be a limit to the water torture effect: What else could come out to keep the story alive, to justify ongoing headlines?

As we get into Day 3, though, the question of Adams' survivability is moving rapidly in new directions, and becoming a lot less clear. There's an accumulative piling on effect, and it could make Adams' position untenable in short order. There are four factors here: The fact that he lied; that he lied about the whole case in response to charges from a fellow candidate for mayor, developer Bob Ball, which led to Ball's statements being dismissed as untrue; acknowledgment that another part of his story (relating to mentoring) was untrue as well; and the appearance at least that as a city council member he hired away a reporter at the Portland Mercury who was working on the story, essentially to quash it. The line between private activity and abuse of office has gotten a little blurrier.

There's a recall effort underway; the grounds: "1. Alleged illegal sexual misconduct with a minor under the age of 18; 2. Alleged ethical misconduct during his mayoral campaign of 2008 by making false statements; 3. Alleged ethical misconduct by encouraging others to lie about his own misconduct; 4. Alleged ethical misconduct by awarding city jobs to members of the media that were reporting, or were professing to report, this issue." That effort is somewhat stymied, though, because under state law elected officials cannot be recalled until they have served at least six months in office.

Although there's been no specific allegation of an illegal act, a state attorney general's inquiry is under way. Multnomah County is doing likewise.

And the news media is all over the story. The print Oregonian this morning had six news stories about Adams' scandal this morning - probably more space devoted to it in the local section than to everything else there put together - along with an editorial concluding: "He's already said he doesn't plan to quit, but we submit that it is not in the city's interest to have a mayor who cannot vouch for his own character under fire. He should resign." The Portland Tribune called for resignation too. And so have piles of letters to the editor around the area.

Can Adams ride this out, or is he being swamped by the storm? Today, even though a resignation may be the only way he would depart, his odds of survival in office much longer look a little less than even.