Press "Enter" to skip to content

Posts published in “Day: January 20, 2006”

Placing Saxton on the spectrum

Ron Saxton, Republican candidate for governor, is a man pulled in a couple of dstinct directions. His main appeal is as the guy who's centrist enough to win over voters in the general election. But to get to the general election, he has to win a primary election where most of the voters are conservative.

Ron SaxtonThat makes for a question ticklish in the extreme: How "moderate" - or "conservative" - is Ron Saxton?

All this should be prefaced with our usual disclaimer: Such labels as "conservative," "moderate" and "liberal" have long since passed any point of real meaning, especially when the most "conservative" politicians in our nation's capital qualify as the most radical major politicians of the last couple of generations. The terms have more to do with branding and with group self-identification, and there they have real political impact and significance.

In running against two candidates commonly defined as "more conservative" - Kevin Mannix and Jason Atkinson - Saxton has been shorthanded as the moderate in the race. He hasn't really seemed to push against that definition, maybe because of the general election advantages it could confer.

But he has gotten support from a number of Oregonians who define themselves as very conservative indeed, and that may - with less than four months remaining till primary election deadline - start to send some ripples, and shivers, around the state. (more…)

After the storm

Spokane's new mayor, Dennis Hession, must know a bit about how Gerald Ford felt in the late summer of 1974 - a low-key, cool personality taking over in the wake of a mighty storm of chaos.

Dennis Hession delivers state of the cityIt may be just the right way. Introducing himself (till recently, he's not been a household word in town), and talking a bit about his upbringing (as a Catholic in Salt Lake City), a family man and a professional with a load of civic involvements, he struck a modest chord as he launched into his first state of the city speech:

"I believe strongly in open, accessible government. With that in mind, I thought it was important to disclose some information about myself. I’ll understand if by the end you are wishing for less transparency, but here goes."

Odds are Spokane wasn't looking for less transparency at all: The surprise opaque nature of Hession's predecessor, Jim West, underday the eight months of chaos the city endured before West's recall on December 6. By starting as he did, Hession gave a nod to the point that civic transparency is good politics as well as good government. (How many in Spokane heard Hession's opening lines and - just for amoment - cringed and thought: No shockers, please!) (more…)


Oregon went for simplicity in its preferred design for a state quarter, opting for a basic view of Crater Lake over more complex sets of images. In looking at designs for something as small as a quarter, that makes sense: Less can be more.

Will Washington go the same way?

Quarter design 1Quarter design 2Quarter design 3

When Governor Christine Gregoire gets to make the choice for her state, she'll have a similar option: Clearly, one of the designs - the salmon and mountain look to the left - says the state more swiftly and cleanly than the others. The middle design, of a tribal rendering of a fish, is simpler graphically, but also subtler - it would probably leave a bunch of people scratching their heads.

What's the popular choice? The Seattle Post-Intelligencer has put the designs on its web page and asked readers to vote. Of the more than 3,100 votes so far, more than half (51.8%) went forthe design at the left, just 19.9% for the design in the middle, and 28.3% for the more complicated design to the right.