Press "Enter" to skip to content

Drop ins

Drop-in time on some Saturdays at Boise City Hall is a new thing from Boise Mayor Dave Beiter, a casual and informal slot in his office time when Boise citizens can walk in and have a few words with the mayor. It’s good politics – who knows how many seedling problems were snuffed with a little face time? (we know of a few) – and also good governance.

There’s a limit, as you go higher up the political chain, to how far you can push this (though, once upon a time, even presidents used to do something similar). A straight equivalent for Bieter’s drop bys may not be entirely practical for Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels. But maybe, easy re-election last year or no, he should consider trying it.

The thought might even occur to some mayoral staff after reading a blistering Seattle Times piece on access to the mayor’s office, on the nightmare story of one Seattle resident who just wanted to be treated with a little respect: “To the lifelong teacher it cuts to the core of what citizenship is all about. First people are discouraged from participation by phone mazes, forms, handoffs and unanswered messages. Then they’re marginalized as irrational, he says, just for continuing to knock on the door.”

Such stories often pass under media radar, since visibility in newspapers and broadcast outlets is sought after even by the Nickels of the world; Seattle Times reporters usually get a callback from city hall. But tales of lack of access, and of bureaucratic indifference, add up and eat like termites into the strongest of political superstructures.

Share on Facebook