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Town hall

There’s some civic interest out there: It didn’t all melt away after the 2004 elections.

Ron WydenWe saw it today at one of the town hall meetings Oregon Senator Ron Wyden was hosting, this one in McMinnville. (Others on Saturday were at Dallas and Salem; he seems to be making the run of the state in about a week or so.) On a rainy, blustery day, about 50 people showed up – a pretty good turnout, especially considering it was a lightly promoted meeting.

More remarkable about it was its practical, workaday feel. Senators hold these kind of meetings all the time around their states, but most of they turn largely into partisan cheering sessions. That wasn’t the case here; while some identifiable Democrats were in view, most of the audience seemed to consist of civic activists and local elected or appointed officials – a range of people of scattered views (more center to left than not though, evidently) there for practical information and ideas. And Wyden specifically said at the start that while he enjoys getting into partisan talk as much as the next politician, this session was a work meeting, and partisanship – as opposed to opinions on issues – should be checked at the door.

And so it was. Anyone who came to this Democratic senator’s meeting expecting a Bush Administration torture session was disappointed. Wyden disagreed with any numbers of Bush policies, but he took on the policies, not the administration. He did some thinking on his feet. He outlined a few ideas in progress – a revised approach to medical insurance, for example – that he said was in early thought stage, and then asked the audience – what do you think? (The audience was split.)

One got the sense of problems being grappled with, rather than rhetoric thrown. Quite a few politicians could earn a lot more respect if they troubled themselves to do something so simple.

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