This will be one of the most talked-about Idaho books in Idaho this season: 14 years after its last edition, Ridenbaugh Press has released a list of 100 influential Idahoans. Randy Stapilus, the editor and publisher of the Idaho Weekly Briefing and author of four earlier similar lists, has based this one on levels of overall influence in the state – and freedom of action and ability to influence development of the state – as of the start of 2015. The list was compiled chiefly in December 2014 and relied on input from a wide variety of publicly-involved Idahoans from the state. It is as current as today.
 
100 Influential Idahoans 2015. By Randy Stapilus; published by Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 202 pages. Softcover. List price $16.95.
100 Influential Idahoans 2015 page.

100 Influential Idahoans 2015
Idaho
 

Jan 24 2015

The salamander’s tale

idaho RANDY
STAPILUS
 
Idaho

The legislative activities most likely to draw a rolling-eyes reaction, at least in the days when I was a newspaper legislative reporter, was the designation of something as the official Idaho state “something.”

Idaho has a roster of them: 16 including the state song, motto and seal. The official fossil (the Hagerman horse; no jokes please). The official fruit (the huckleberry; no jokes, please). The official raptor (the peregrine falcon; you know the drill) as well as the official state bird (the mountain bluebird).

Most reporters and legislators used to think, at least: Do we really need more? Is there need to spend legislative time on additional designations? Turns out there are some practical reasons to do so.

The first bill introduced in this session, House Bill 1, sought to designate the giant salamander as the state amphibian. It was rejected on January 19 by the House State Affairs Committee.

It’s given me cause for a rethink.

At the hearing, Frank Lundberg of Boise, who is as expert on the subject of reptiles as anyone I know, pointed out that state symbols aren’t just ornamental: “They are a way to promote and enhance understanding of qualities that are unique to the state. Our symbols serve as messengers of what is special about Idaho to other people, states and countries.”

Why a state amphibian? Lundberg: “Amphibians are one piece of the natural heritage of Idaho that makes this state such a wondrous place to live. They have some amazing characteristics, some that could one day help medical research. Salamanders can regenerate lost limbs, some frogs freeze solid in the winter, having no heartbeat, and yet defrost in the spring and hop off. The word ‘amphibian’ means double life, referring to the fact that they are born in water but often live on land. Idaho Giant Salamanders epitomize the name ‘amphibian’ as they are born and live in water with external gills, yet for reasons we don’t quite understand yet, some individuals absorb their gills, grow lungs , and go live on land, only returning to the water to breed. Twenty other states have recognized this uniqueness by including these marvelous creatures in their state symbols.”

And, he pointed out, Idaho is the only place where the Giant Salamander lives.

How would Idaho benefit from this? “It says something good about Idaho. It says we care about the things that are unique to our state, to Idaho. It provides us with yet another symbol, another tool, which we can use to promote the benefits of Idaho to others. While it may be safely stated that not everyone cares if there’s a state amphibian, many in the country do care and will take note of one unique to Idaho. A few more people will visit the state. A few more scientists will study something in Idaho. School students will have another opportunity to learn more about Idaho.”

Practical benefits, then, at no cost.

The bill, proposed by a Boise junior high student, got support from Boise-area Democrats and Republicans, but not nearly enough to clear the committee. Continue Reading »

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Jan 24 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Boise public library hosts 3-D printers (Boise Statesman)
Legislators look at banning instant racing (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
Lewiston’s Gold’s Gym will shutter (Lewiston Tribune)
Legislators consider general fund for roads (Lewiston Tribune)
Democrats paid for ‘Tea Party’ flier (Moscow News)
Idahoans polled on use of public lands (Moscow News)
Nampa likely to see a Chick-fil-a (Nampa Press Tribune)
Idaho has varied online learning operations (Nampa Press Tribune)
Ohio Governor Kasich pitches messag at Boise (TF Times News)
Jerome works on Main Street revival (TF Times News)

Where do crime victims at UO go? (Eugene Register Guard)
Nike sued over Michael Jordan picture (Eugene Register Guard)
Gas prices at Klamath below $2 a gallon (KF Herald & News)
Part-time office opens by OC&E state trail (KF Herald & News)
Marijuana public hearings begin (Portland Oregonian, KF Herald & News)
Police go after string of car break-ins (Medford Tribune)
Layoffs accumulate at Ashland Ski Area (Medford Tribune)
Negotiations seem near end on drone flights (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Salem Health facility packed full (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bainbridge Island may buy park area for $6m (Bremerton Sun)
Carrier Ranger to be towed to Texas (Bremereton Sun)
Signs for free coffee will return to I-5 (Everett Herald)
Longview narrows search for city manager (Longviiew News)
Reichert says Obama should get Democrats behind trade (Olympian)
Prices for Super Bowl tickets super-high (Seattle Times)
Diocese-firm deal reached on malpractice case (Spokane Spokesman)
Bill aims to speed analysis of rape kits (Tacoma News Tribune)
Poison centers hear more pot-related calls (Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic)
Clark County staff reviews effect of charter (Vancouver Columbian)
Gas falling below $2 a gallon in Vancouver (Vancouver Columbian, Yskima Herald Republic)

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Jan 23 2015

Cheers, jeers

carlson CHRIS
CARLSON

 
Carlson
Chronicles

Cheers. . . . . to Boise Mayor David Bieter who took advantage of some face time with President Barack Obama on Air Force #1 while flying to Boise to lobby for the President to utilize his authority under the Antiquities Act to make the Boulder/White Clouds a National Monument. The President can and will give Rep. Mike Simpson the six months he has requested to get a new bill through the House after Senator Jim Risch six years ago went back on his word and put a hold on the bill Simpson had worked out with all the interest groups and was ten years in the making. Risch remains a road block in the Senate so even if Simpson gets his revised bill through the House he still has to overcome Risch before something is on the President’s desk. You can bet your last dollar though that if there is no Boulder/White Clouds bill on Obama’s desk as his term winds down, there will be national monument declared under the Antiquities Act.

Cheers. . . .also to former Governor Cecil D. Andrus, Idaho Conservation League Executive Director Rick Johnson and to Roberta Crockett, all of whom mentioned to the President while he was in Boise the need to protect the Boulder/White Clouds.

Jeers. . . .to Lt. Gov. Brad Little, who, as Acting Governor with Gov. Otter recovering from a hip operation, greeted the President when he landed in Boise. Little used his face time to lobby the President against a Monument declaration. Little should not be carrying Sandra Mitchell’s brief case nor carrying water for the snowmobilers and ATV users she represents who think it is their God-given right to run anywhere they want, anytime they want in Idaho’s vast backcountry. Brad should be aligning himself with Rep. Simpson and not the troglodites like Senator Jim Risch.

Cheers. . . . . .again to Governor Andrus, and add Governor Phil Batt, for once again standing up to the federal government and saying no to additional spent fuel alledgedly for research purposes. The Batt agreement is working and Idaho should not grant waivers for any reason.

Rest assured Andrus, who had some time with the President, also touched on the subject of nuke waste with the President. Though Andrus seldom mentions what he says to any President, always treating such conversations as private and privileged, don’t be surprised if the Energy Secretry doesn’t get an order from the White House to back off plans to bring two shipments of 25 spent fuel rods each to Idaho, at least until the department has answered the pointed questions Andrus sent on behalf of himself and Batt to the Governor’s office and the Department of Energy on January 22nd.

Jeers. . . . to the City of Boise. Or cheers if you lean towards secular humanism. Despite a heavy concentration of Mormons and Catholics in Idaho, the state’s largest metropolitan area failed to make it anywhere on Christianity Today’s recently published list of the 100 most Bible-oriented communities in the nation. Study was based on the percentage of population that reads the Bible at least once a week. Continue Reading »

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Jan 23 2015

Unlocking digital tools

trahant MARK
TRAHANT

 
Austerity

It’s time for State of the Unions. President Barack Obama, of course, on Tuesday. Then, a variety of state reports across the country. And, on Thursday, Indian Country’s national version, the State of Indian Nations. National Congress of American Indians President Brian Cladoosby spent about an hour talking about some of the challenges facing the more than five hundred tribal governments.

“Today, I bring a simple message from the tribes of the 21st Century: We must tear down barriers to growth, simplify regulations that are limiting opportunities, and acknowledge that tribes have the capability as governments to oversee our own affairs,” Cladoosby said. “Congress and the administration need to find ways to help bring federal agencies out of the 19th Century and into the 21st Century. We need them to be partners for growth and not barriers to growth.”

President Cladoosby’s talk covered much ground — a lot of material critical to tribal governments, such as rethinking the federal-trust relationship, an invitation for leaders of Congress to visit Indian Country, and for Washington’s NFL franchise to finally, finally, change its name.

I’d like to expand on two themes from the State of the Indian Nations speech — youth and technology.

The most common age in America today is 22 years old. This year, 2015, the Millennial Generation will pass the Baby Boomers as the largest-age group in the country. Indian Country is even younger than the rest of the nation. The American Indian Alaska Native population from birth through age 24 makes up 42 percent of the total Native American population (compared to about a third for country as a whole.)

We are at a moment in history where we really ought to be investing more resources in young people. Yet, instead, as President Obama said in his State of the Union, we’re loading up this generation with student debt — a total that now exceeds a trillion dollars. This is the logic behind the president’s call to make community college free. A proposal that will benefit Indian Country, including tribal colleges and universities.

But this is also about technology. We need a structure to prepare people for jobs that don’t yet exist. Continue Reading »

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Jan 23 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Tuition raises go partly for pay raises (Boise Statesman)
Looking at the cost of Obama’s Idaho trip (Boise Statesman)
Obamacare easing pressure in indigent care program (Nampa Press Tribune, Lewiston Tribune)
Regents at WSU may ban tobacco on campus (Moscow News)
How safe are Moscow crosswalks? (Moscow News)
Add the words hearing set for Monday (Nampa Press Tribune)
New Nampa office building opens for St. Alphonsus (Nampa Press Tribune)
Obama says he’ll work on freeing Idaho pastor (Pocatello Journal)
President at Eastern Idaho Tech likes free college (Pocatello Journal)
Rangen water call stayed in SRBA court (TF Times News)
State says wolf population high enough to avoid feds (TF Times News)

Eugene utility exec once fired, now rehired (Eugene Register Guard)
Funds arrived for Swanson mill rebuild (Eugene Register Guard)
Two UO librarians questioned about doc leak (Eugene Register Guard)
Oregon Tech trustees hold initial meeting (KD Herald & News)
Series of quakes erupt in S-Central OR desert (KF Herald & News)
Protest arrive over natural gas pipeline (Medford Tribune)
Possible closure ahead for asphalt plant (Medford Tribune)
Pendleton parents want pot kept away from kids (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Minimum wage at $15 would add $49 a month (Portland Oregonian)
Orenco nature park makes progress (Portland Oregonian)
Who should decide on school mascots? (Salem Statesman Journal)
Area C in Keizer might be developed (Salem Statesman Journal)

Root rot leads to chopping park trees (Bremerton Sun)
Narrows ferry tolls go up on July 1 (Bremerton Sun)
More bridge work planned at Everett (Everett Herald)
Everett city turns down county new courthouse plan (Everett Herald)
Counting the local homeless at Everett (Everett Herald)
Temporary Wyerhaeuser layoffs scheduled (Longview News)
Kalakala goes on its final trip (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Lucky Eagle casino slated for expansion (Olympian)
Bird quarantine set for Agnew area (Port Angeles News)
Tab for Bertha goes mostly to the state (Seattle Times)
State fair set to expand in 2016 (Tacoma News Tribune)
Fisher CEO says local economy looking good (Vancouver Columbian)
Medical pot under more review at Olympia (Yakima Herald Republic)
How about ballots with return postage? (Yakima Herald Republic)
Solid job improvement through 2014 (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Jan 22 2015

White House photo of the day

by under Idaho.

Obama at Boise
 

President Barack Obama greets attendees at his Boise State University speaking event.

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Jan 22 2015

What Obama said in Boise

ridenbaugh Northwest
Reading

From the White House transcript of President Barack Obama’s remarks in Boise on Wednesday.

So, last night, I gave my State of the Union address. (Applause.) Today, I’m going to be shorter. I won’t be too short, just a little shorter. (Laughter.) And I focused last night on what we can do, together, to make sure middle-class economics helps more Americans get ahead in the new economy. And I said that I’d take these ideas across the country. And I wanted my first stop to be right here in Boise, Idaho. (Applause.)

Now, there are a couple reasons for this. The first is because, last year, Michelle and I got a very polite letter from a young girl named Bella Williams — who is here today. Where’s Bella? There she is right there. Wave, Bella. (Applause.) Bella is 13 now, but she was 12 at the time. So she wrote me a letter and she said, “I know what you’re thinking — Wow, what’s it like in Boise, Idaho?” (Laughter.) So she invited me to come visit. And she also invited me to learn how to ski or snowboard with her. (Applause.) Now, as somebody who was born in Hawaii, where there’s not a lot of snow — let me put it this way — you do not want to see me ski. (Laughter.) Or at least the Secret Service does not want to see me ski. (Laughter.)

But what I do know about Boise is that it’s beautiful. I know that because I’ve been here before. I campaigned here in 2008. (Applause.) It was really fun. And the truth is, because of the incredible work that was done here in Idaho, it helped us win the primary. And I might not be President if it weren’t for the good people of Idaho. (Applause.) Of course, in the general election I got whupped. (Laughter.) I got whupped twice, in fact. But that’s okay – I’ve got no hard feelings. (Laughter.)

In fact, that’s exactly why I’ve come back. Because I ended my speech last night with something that I talked about in Boston just over a decade ago, and that is there is not a liberal America or a conservative America, but a United States of America. (Applause.)

And today, I know it can seem like our politics are more divided than ever. And in places like Idaho, the only “blue” turf is on your field. (Applause.) And the pundits in Washington hold up these divisions in our existing politics and they show, well, this is proof that any kind of hopeful politics, that’s just naïve. But as I told you last night, I still believe what I said back then. I still believe that, as Americans, we have more in common than not. (Applause.)

I mean, we have an entire industry that’s designed to sort us out. Our media is all segmented now so that instead of just watching three stations, we got 600. And everything is market-segmented, and you got the conservative station and the liberal stations. So everybody is only listening to what they already agree with. And then you’ve got political gerrymandering that sorts things out so that every district is either one thing or the other. And so there are a lot of institutional forces that make it seem like we have nothing in common.

But one of the great things about being President is you travel all across the country and I’ve seen too much of the good and generous and big-hearted optimism of people, young and old — folks like Bella. I’ve seen how deep down there’s just a core decency and desire to make progress together among the American people. (Applause.) That’s what I believe.

So I’ve got two years left and I am not going to stop trying — trying to make our politics work better. Continue Reading »

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Jan 22 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Obama visits Boise, delivers speech (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune, Pocatello Journal, Moscow News)
Washington AG proposes 21 as smoking age (Lewiston Tribune, Moscow News)
Nampa mayor Henry delivers state of the state (Nampa Press Tribune)
Idaho officials warn of avian flu spread (Nampa Press Tribune)
Xavier charter school buys building (TF Time News)

UO demands released documents back (Eugene Register Guard)
Local gas falls below $2 a gallon (Eugen Register Guard)
Man with measles tracked while contagious (Eugene Register Guard)
Renovations planned for Kalamth school (KF Herald & News)
KF council set increase in sewer rate (KF Herald & News)
Ashland chicken pox activity eases off (Medford Tribune)
Umatilla cultural center plans solar carport (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Progress expected on Pioneer Park proposal (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Oregon unemployment down to August 2008 level (Portland Oregonian, Salem Statesman Journal)
Carcinogens found in some e-cigarettes (Portland Oregonian)

Help located for Kitsap crisis centers (Bremerton Sun)
Inslee says legislators to blame on road funding (Everett Herald)
Stanwood debates library location (Everett Herald)
Local gas falls below $2 a gallon (Longview News)
State AG proposes 21 as smoking age (Spokane Spokesman, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Longview News)
Salary board votes to raise legislator pay (Vancouver Columbian, Olympian)
Forum explores how cuts at army base may hurt area (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Superbug sickens people at Seattle hospital (Seattle Times)
Seahawks try trademarking all sorts of things (Seattle Times)
Windows 10 emerging in release (Seattle Times)
Flu kills 6 so far in Spokane area (Spokane Spokesman)
Tolls on Tacoma Narrow Bridge will go up (Tacoma News Tribune)
Legislators consider pot DUI rules (Tacoma News Tribune)
New PAC takes aim at Vancouver port commission (Vancouver Columbian)

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Jan 21 2015

Pay-for state-ofs

frazier DAVID
FRAZIER

 
Boise
Guardian

President Obama is headed for Boise in the next few days. His speech — a follow up to the “state of the union” — will be free, even if it doesn’t include the infamous “rubber chicken” or snacks.

Imagine the uproar if the Governor or the President delivered a “state of the state” or “state of the union” address as a fund-raiser and charged for seating. That’s the plan for Treasure Valley mayors in coming weeks.

Seems the mayors of Treasure Valley have simply forgotten their roots–with the exception of Garret Nancolas of Caldwell. They are planning to address the citizens about public issues, talk about spending public money, and charge the citizens to hear them at an inconvenient time for the average worker. Nancolas’ speech is free.

Bob Henry of Nampa, Tammy de Weerd of Meridian, and Eagle’s Jim Reynolds all have scheduled “State of The City” speeches and they expect citizens to PAY to hear them expound on their goals and accomplishments. Sure, if you want to be a cheapskate or simply can’t afford lunch you can sit in the corner for free.

The GUARDIAN has bitched about the practice and the fund raiser nature for years, especially in Boise where 1,000 businessmen, contractors, and other beneficiaries gather for a breakfast where it costs $40 a plate–yielding a gross of $40,000 for the special interest business lobbying group called the Chamber of Commerce. (The only reason there is free seating at all is due to prior GUARDIAN posts). Continue Reading »

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Jan 21 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Obama will visit BSU tech laboratory (Boise Statesman)
Rep. Andrus and the salamander bill (Pocatello Journal)
Obama will meet with wife of jailed pastor (TF Times News)

Lane county reports measles (Eugene Register Guard)
Utility district wants leader back, he won’t come (Eugene Register Guard)
Hospital board members rescind resignation (KF Herald & News)

Port Prchard spots grill closes (Bremerton Sun)
Ferry game failures upset Kitsap (Bremerton Sun)
Pro-life rally draws statehouse crowd (Olympian)
State official delay avian flu quarantine (Port Angeles News)
Final trip planned for Kalakala (Tacoma News Tribune)
Bill would require local pot bans win votes (Tacoma News Tribune)
Goldendale considers its pot future (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Jan 20 2015

Eye on the nuclear rabbit

ridenbaugh Northwest
Reading

A guest opinion by Cecil D. Andrus, former Idaho governor, on nuclear waste at the Idaho National Laboratory.

There’s an old country expression that the people of Idaho should take to heart: Keep your eye on the rabbit. In this case, the rabbit is the incontestable threat to Idaho’s economic and environmental future presented by the storage above the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer of nuclear waste, whether liquid, transuranic or solid in the form of spent fuel rods.

It would only take one major seismic event to precipitate nuclear-tainted material migrating to and beginning to infect the aquifer. Idahoans would see a major part of the state’s agricultural economy, particularly the downstream potato, beet, alfalfa and trout farm businesses destroyed, never to recover.

Imagine how deadly one political cartoon showing an irradiated potato “going viral” would be?

One out of two residents in South Idaho obtain their culinary water directly or indirectly from the Snake River and/or the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer. If you are one of those two, how would you feel about continuing to draw your household water from a compromised source?

There are several key matters the public should keep in mind.

Gov. Phil Batt’s historic 1995 agreement that, to his lasting credit, he drove through the “Red Zone” was premised on a mutual agreement between the state and the federal government that all nuclear waste above the aquifer was to be removed from Idaho by 2035.

My fellow citizens, you are not going to reach that goal by adding to the waste instead of continuing to draw it down. Gov. Batt said it quite well: “You take an ounce of waste from the federal government, they want to give you 10,000 pounds.”

The issue is not so much what 50 spent fuel rods weigh (EPA states they could weigh up to 1,500 pounds each) that Gov. Butch Otter wants to allow, nor how much revenue-generating research is going to be generated by the spent fuel rods. The issue is that Gov. Otter and Attorney General Lawrence Wasden are looking the other way as Idaho’s National Laboratory increasingly becomes the de facto replacement for Yucca Mountain, Nev., as the nation’s permanent repository.

The second fundamental issue is this: Who do you trust to look out for your interests with the “greatest good for the greatest number” as a guiding principle? Is it two governors who between them have served Idaho in one office or another for a combined 80 years and have stood fast against Idaho becoming a dumping ground, or is it a federal government with a long history of breaking promises?

By the way, this is the same federal government that Gov. Otter so excoriated in his State of the State on a number of fronts. Why does he think they can be trusted to serve as “co-guardians” of Idaho’s future?

Gov. Batt and I are giving the people of this great state a solemn pledge that we are going to ask some tough questions in the next few weeks. We intend to get answers. This is not the first time Gov. Otter has sought an exemption. Exceptions quickly turn to norms, and we believe his administration has operated far too long in the shadows on this critical matter.

We take seriously the oath of office we both first took as governors to uphold the Idaho Constitution and to serve the best interests of the people. Though we no longer hold public office, we believe it still applies and we intend to do our duty.

Cecil D. Andrus is a former governor of Idaho.

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Jan 20 2015

Mormon mystery to miracle?

carlson CHRIS
CARLSON

 
Carlson
Chronicles

Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney is assessing his prospects for another run at the Presidency. His name indentification alone from being the GOP presidential candidate in 2012 would in normal times give him a leg up and make him the leading contender.

However, these are not normal times and there are some insurmountable obstacles standing in the way. That is not saying he does not have some assets, because he does.

First, he is adaptable, or, as he says with a new-found self-deprecating sense of humor, wife Ann says he learns from experience and is getting more experienced. Romney, his wife and their talented, attractive children are convinced that the warmer, human and humane side of the good husband and fine father he is was not allowed to show in 2012.

Second, they believe his executive and business skills will be even more obvious as an asset both in the primaries against non-business ceo’s like Senators Rand Paul and Ted Cruz, as well as presumptive Democratic nominee, former Senator Hillary Clinton. They will argue that only Mitt has the ability to capitalize on and make sure the nation’s economic expansion continues.

Third, supporters like Utah Congressman Jason Chaffetz claim time has proven that in foreign affairs Romney was correct in saying one could and should not trust the Russians. Across the board they believe their man’s ability to understsnd better the “optics” of issues than the President has been bourne out.

His two biggest assets, however, have considerable downsides. These two assets are flip sides of the same coin, and that is Romney’s Mormonism. The plain fact is that the Church Authorities up to and including virtually all the membets of the 12 Apostles and the First Presidency, are very proud of Governor Romney and his viability as a candidate for the Presidency.

Publicly, of course, the LDS church and its leadership maintain a posture of neutrality and non-partisanship. However, privately and behind the scenes this “favorite son” quality enables Romney to be one of only two GOP candidates, the other being Florida Governor Jeb Bush, and only one Democrat, former Senator Hillary Clinton, capable of raising the one billion dollars (yes, that is a “b”) most political analysts believe will be raised and spent to secure a party nomination and then run a viable campaign for the Presidency.

Thus, from an organizational and fund-riasing standpoint, Romney’s faith and religion are great assets. Through the Church he has an ability to muster more dedicated followers than even the Clintons and the Obamas.

And through the Church he has an almost inexhaustible fund-raising base that will enable him at a minimum to wear down his lesser resourced opposition, again with the exception of former Flordia Governor Jeb Bush.

If Romney does formally annnounce one can expect his 2012 Fiance co-chair, Melaleuca chairman Frank VanderSloot of Idaho Falls, to again line up as many statewide elected Republicans, and others, such as the Legislative leadership, behind Romney. It migh not be as easy as 2012 for there is little doubt that former Idaho attorney general and lieutenant governor David Leroy will head up Jeb’s Idaho camapign.

Count on Leroy and othe Bush loyalists across the country to exploit publicly one great negative issue in Romney’s record that he cannnot walk away from: he will be linked inextricably to the hated President Obama and the ObamaCare Health Plan which Democrats themselves say was modeled on the RomneyCare Health Reform program promoted and passed into law when Mitt was the governor of the state.

Romney’s biggest negative though is that because he is Mormon he cannot win in the south. If he cannot win the south he can neither win the nomination nor the general election. The path to the White House goes through Florida both in the primaries and the general. Continue Reading »

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Jan 20 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Reviewing presidential visits to Idaho (Boise Statesman)
Near-downtown homes may be moved from 5th st (Boise Statesman)
‘Ag Gag’ bill arrives in Washington legislature (Moscow News)
Local debate over genetically modified crops (Nampa Press Tribune)
As jobless rate declines, food stamp use rises (Nampa Press Tribune)
Water call for Rangen goes through (TF Times News)
Leading Idaho officials won’t be at Boise Obama event (TF Times News)
TF courts move toward paperless operation (TF Times News)

Eugene council keeps discussing taxes (Eugene Register Guard)
Pacific Power talks about possible KF city lawsuit (KF Herald & News)
Impact of low gas prices (Medford Tribune)
Walden blasts Obama immigration order (Pendleton E Oregonian)
DNA says Kennewick Man was an Indian (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Regulations impacting drop-in day care efforts (Portland Oregonian)

One phone calls 911 thousands of times on fakes (Bremerton Sun)
Snohomish evaluates 911 software (Everett Herald)
Longview looks at city manager finalists (Longview News)
Longview looks at “carbon capture’ for port (Longview News)
Backers of more post-prison monitoring look for money (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
MLK Day rallies, speeches (Spokesman Review, Bremerton Sun)
DNA says Kennewick Man was an Indian (Spokesman Review)
State House bars open carry in chamber (Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic)

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Jan 19 2015

State of the Union mentions

trahant MARK
TRAHANT

 
Austerity

Indian Country is rarely mentioned during a presidential State of the Union. That’s too bad. There is so much a president could do to improve the administration of federal Indian policy.

The president could urge Congress to fund Treaty Right obligations as automatic. After all, it’s essentially the same kind of spending as interest on the federal debt. (A cost, by the way, that the Congressional Budget Office figures will triple in a decade, reaching some $800 billion.)

Or insist on multi-year budgets for the Indian health system, making it much easier to plan ahead, be more efficient, and improve health care.

In a perfect world the president would ask Congress to invest in the next generation of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Everyone talks about how important young people are — so why not do something and something substantial?

Funny thing about that last point: That’s exactly what President Barack Obama will propose in his annual message to Congress.

The United States “dedicated ourselves to cultivating the most educated workforce in the world and we invested in what’s one of the crown jewels of this country, and that’s our higher education system. And dating back to Abraham Lincoln, we invested in land-grant colleges. We understood that this was a hallmark of America, this investment in education. But eventually, the world caught on and the world caught up,” he said in a Knoxville, Tennessee, speech, a preview of the State of the Union. “And that’s why we have to lead the world in education again.”

In an economy where knowledge and technology fuel the future the president said “the single most important way to get ahead is not just to get a high school education, you’ve got to get some higher education.”

Even though the president’s message was broad, he was also giving an apt description of the 37 tribal colleges and universities. Then again, the president is not new to this issue. He’s already championed increasing opportunity for Native students, most recently signing an executive order affirming that commitment.

So any boost in funding for community colleges will likely result in more money for tribal colleges too and that’s a smart investment for a lot of reasons.

First consider the big picture, the budget. It’s clear that the US government is on an austerity course. Money for education and other domestic programs has been shrinking not growing (measured by share of the economy). But the entitlement side of the budget —
Social Security, Medicaid and Medicare — is getting more expensive because of the sheer size of the Baby Boom generation.

The problem is that the country is not investing enough in the next generation; instead it’s saddling young people with student debt, now exceeding some $1.2 trillion (more than any other type of household debt). It’s we Baby Boomers who should be shouting about the stupidity of this policy. Fact is we need young people to be as successful as possible, as quickly as possible, to pay for our retirement. The generation called the Echo Boomers is huge, some 90 million people. (The most common age in America right now is 22 years old.) Continue Reading »

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Jan 19 2015

In the Briefings

gun

 
Tactical Export Strategies has organized 13 Idaho recreation-technology (rec-tech) companies to create a complete and functioning firearm from Idaho-made products. This firearm will be on display at the 2015 Shooting Hunting and Outdoor Trade (S.H.O.T) Show in Las Vegas at the Sands Expo Center January 20-23, 2015, in the Idaho Commerce booth (booth 2943).  (Image/Idaho Department of Commerce)

 
The Oregon Ducks’ loss at the national championship level stung, and it may not have been exactly the right note on which to launch the Oregon Legislature and re-swear in (for the fourth time) Governor John Kitzhaber. But the timing was fixed. A large portion of the governor’s combination inaugural and state of the state speech is in this edition along with a commentary on its unusual content.

The Washington Legislature launched last week, with much of the attention going to the governor’s state of the state address; much of it is reprinted in this edition. A pile of legislation was introduced as well, and some samples are referenced in the state section.

As per usual, the Idaho Legislature hasn’t immediately roared into action – things move a little slower in the first couple of weeks – but a lot of attention went to the governor’s state of the state address. A large chunk of it is reprinted in this issue, along with part of the Democratic response.

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Jan 19 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Supreme Court will hear Idaho Medicaid pay case (Boise Statesman)
DARE school programs generally in decline (Lewiston Tribune)
Getting into the Obama Boise events (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
Most of Idaho has strong snowpack (Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News)
Southern Idaho will see 13 new solar projects (Nampa Press Tribune)
Zions Bank starts political website (TF Times News)

3 of 4 Wendy’s at Eugene close (Eugene Register Guard)
New grant will help restore oak habitat (Medford Tribune)

Seahawks advance to Superbowl (Seattle Times, Spokane Spokesman, Tacoma News Tribune, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Kitsap Sun, Olympian, Longview News, Port Angeles News)
Plan suggests rilaroad loop at Everett (Everett Herald)
Lynnwood renting some land for $5 (Everett Herald)
Kilmer, constituents talk electronic warfare (Port Angeles News)
Reviewing legislator action on pot (Vancouver Columbian)
Vancouver oil terminal a divisive subject (Vancouver Columbian)

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Jan 18 2015

We lost the war

rainey BARRETT
RAINEY

 
Second
Thoughts

The war of terror is over. The terrorists won.

Before reaching for your friendly keyboard to throw electronic “rocks” my way, consider the evidence. As a matter of fact, consider a lot of evidence. The latest: three guys massacred 16 people in France. Though they met their own violent end(s) hours later, there are now 10,000 French army troops walking the streets of that country with 10,000 automatic weapons at the ready. Three dead guys – 10,000 armed troops. Plus God knows how many local cops, security types and various private guns-for-hire.

One guy – just one – puts some explosive powder on his shoe in an aircraft and tries to light it afire. From that day forward, hundreds of millions of us have had to walk barefoot in airport lobbies. One guy – millions barefoot.

Another guy – just one – had what appeared to be an explosive in his shorts while being an airlines traveler. From that day forward, hundreds of millions of us have had to endure full body scans and/or body scans with hand wands. One guy – millions of us being body scanned.

I could fill a few dozen more paragraphs but you get the idea. When dealing with terrorists, they almost always win by definition because, from the moment of the violence, everyone else reacts. Or over-reacts. Someone breaks into your house – you buy a burglar alarm. Or a gun. Or both. You buy new and heavier locks. More of ‘em. Somebody bashes your parked car. You fix it and park it somewhere else. You react – doing things you otherwise wouldn’t have done. Your thinking changes.

First the violence – the terror, if you will. Then the response.

Many moons ago, I landed in Washington D.C. – unemployed. Thanks to the late Sen. Len Jordan, I was hired as a uniformed Capitol police officer. Now days, Capitol officers are professionals – as well-trained as the D.C. cops. Patronage employees are now limited to copiers and staple machines.

I used to wander the halls of the Capitol and the House and Senate office buildings, first as a tourist and later as a reporter. You don’t do that today. Scanners, badges, armed police, body searches and more. All over the place. There are large cement planters everywhere on the Hill to block someone trying to ram a vehicle into a building. Acres of blacktop and more of just grass – cordoned off to keep open spaces on the Hill – open. Sharpshooters on the roofs of many federal buildings around the Capitol. Same with the White House and other locations.

Terrorists. Just a handful over the last 40-50 years. But billions spent in that same time reacting. Just in Washington D.C..

Checked your local court house or city hall carefully lately? Looked really close at those new cement planter boxes out front? The little security cameras in the trees or jutting out from the eaves? How about the new “No Parking” areas or the removal of parking spaces that used to be so handy? Noticed an armed officer or two in public buildings – or schools – in our little towns? How about all that new military hardware for local cops?

Terrorists. Winning. While we react. Continue Reading »

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Raising the Hardy Boys page.

 

Hardy

 
"Not a day passes that I don’t think about Vietnam. Sometimes its an aroma or just hearing the Vietnamese accent of a store clerk that triggers a memory. Unlike all too many soldiers, I never had to fire a weapon in anger. Return to civilian life was easy, but even after all these years away from the Army and Vietnam I find the experience – and knowledge – continue to shape my life daily."
 
Drafted! Vietnam in War and in Peace. by David R. Frazier; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton OR. 188 pgs. Softcover. $15.95.
The DRAFTED! page.

 

Drafted
 
Many critics said it could not be done - and it often almost came undone. Now the Snake River Basin Adjudication is done, and that improbable story is told here by three dozen of the people most centrally involved with it - judges, attorneys, legislators, engineers, water managers, water users and others in the room when the decisions were made.
Through the Waters: An Oral History of the Snake River Basin Adjudication. edited by the Idaho State Bar Water Law Section and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 300 pages. Softcover. $16.95.
See the THROUGH THE WATERS page.


 
Oregon Governor Vic Atiyeh died on July 20, 2014; he was widely praised for steady leadership in difficult years. Writer Scott Jorgensen talks with Atiyeh and traces his background, and what others said about him.
Conversations with Atiyeh. by W. Scott Jorgensen; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 140 pages. Softcover. $14.95.
The CONVERSATIONS WITH ATIYEH page.

Atiyeh
 
"Salvation through public service and the purging of awful sights seen during 1500 Vietnam War helicopter rescue missions before an untimely death, as told by a devoted brother, leaves a reader pondering life's unfairness. A haunting read." Chris Carlson, Medimont Reflections. ". . . a vivid picture of his brother Jerry’s time as a Medivac pilot in Vietnam and contrasts it with the reality of the political system . . . through the lens of a blue-collar, working man made good." Mike Kennedy.
One Flaming Hour: A memoir of Jerry Blackbird. by Mike Blackbird; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 220 pages. Softcover. $15.95.
See the ONE FLAMING HOUR page.


 
Back in Print! Frank Church was one of the leading figures in Idaho history, and one of the most important U.S. senators of the last century. From wilderness to Vietnam to investigating the CIA, Church led on a host of difficult issues. This, the one serious biography of Church originally published in 1994, is back in print by Ridenbaugh Press.
Fighting the Odds: The Life of Senator Frank Church. LeRoy Ashby and Rod Gramer; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 800 pages. Softcover. $24.95.
See the FIGHTING THE ODDS page.


 
JOURNEY WEST

by Stephen Hartgen
The personal story of the well-known editor, publisher and state legislator's travel west from Maine to Idaho. A well-written account for anyone interested in Idaho, journalism or politics.
JOURNEY WEST: A memoir of journalism and politics, by Stephen Hartgen; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, here or at Amazon.com (softcover)

 

 

NEW EDITIONS is the story of the Northwest's 226 general-circulation newspapers and where your newspaper is headed.
New Editions: The Northwest's Newspapers as They Were, Are and Will Be. Steve Bagwell and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 324 pages. Softcover. (e-book ahead). $16.95.
See the NEW EDITIONS page.

How many copies?

 
THE OREGON POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

The Field Guide is the reference for the year on Oregon politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Compiled by a long-time Northwest political writer and a Salem Statesman-Journal political reporter.
OREGON POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Hannah Hoffman; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
THE IDAHO POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase is the reference for the year on Idaho Politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Written by two of Idaho's most veteran politcal observers.
IDAHO POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
without compromise
WITHOUT COMPROMISE is the story of the Idaho State Police, from barely-functioning motor vehicles and hardly-there roads to computer and biotechnology. Kelly Kast has spent years researching the history and interviewing scores of current and former state police, and has emerged with a detailed and engrossing story of Idaho.
WITHOUT COMPROMISE page.

 

Diamondfield
How many copies?
The Old West saw few murder trials more spectacular or misunderstood than of "Diamondfield" Jack Davis. After years of brushes with the noose, Davis was pardoned - though many continued to believe him guilty. Max Black has spent years researching the Diamondfield saga and found startling new evidence never before uncovered - including the weapon and one of the bullets involved in the crime, and important documents - and now sets out the definitive story. Here too is Black's story - how he found key elements, presumed lost forever, of a fabulous Old West story.
See the DIAMONDFIELD page for more.
 

Medimont Reflections Chris Carlson's Medimont Reflections is a followup on his biography of former Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus. This one expands the view, bringing in Carlson's take on Idaho politics, the Northwest energy planning council, environmental issues and much more. The Idaho Statesman: "a pull-back-the-curtain account of his 40 years as a player in public life in Idaho." Available here: $15.95 plus shipping.
See the Medimont Reflections page  
 
Idaho 100 NOW IN KINDLE
 
Idaho 100, about the 100 most influential people ever in Idaho, by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson is now available. This is the book about to become the talk of the state - who really made Idaho the way it is? NOW AN E-BOOK AVAILABLE THROUGH KINDLE for just $2.99. Or, only $15.95 plus shipping.
 

Idaho 100 by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson. Order the Kindle at Amazon.com. For the print edition, order here or at Amazon.


 

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    Monday mornings on KLIX-AM

    watergates

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    More about this book by Randy Stapilus

    Water rights and water wars: They’re not just a western movie any more. The Water Gates reviews water supplies, uses and rights to use water in all 50 states.242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

    intermediary

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    More about this book by Lin Tull Cannell

    At a time when Americans were only exploring what are now western states, William Craig tried to broker peace between native Nez Perces and newcomers from the East. 15 years in the making, this is one of the most dramatic stories of early Northwest history. 242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

    Upstream

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    The Snake River Basin Adjudication is one of the largest water adjudications the United States has ever seen, and it may be the most successful. Here's how it happened, from the pages of the SRBA Digest, for 16 years the independent source.

    Paradox Politics

    ORDER HERE or Amazon.com

    After 21 years, a 2nd edition. If you're interested in Idaho politics and never read the original, now's the time. If you've read the original, here's view from now.


    Governing Idaho:
    Politics, People and Power

    by James Weatherby
    and Randy Stapilus
    Caxton Press
    order here

    Outlaw Tales
    of Idaho

    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here

    It Happened in Idaho
    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here

    Camping Idaho
    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here