This will be one of the most talked-about Idaho books in Idaho this season: 14 years after its last edition, Ridenbaugh Press has released a list of 100 influential Idahoans. Randy Stapilus, the editor and publisher of the Idaho Weekly Briefing and author of four earlier similar lists, has based this one on levels of overall influence in the state – and freedom of action and ability to influence development of the state – as of the start of 2015. The list was compiled chiefly in December 2014 and relied on input from a wide variety of publicly-involved Idahoans from the state. It is as current as today.
 
100 Influential Idahoans 2015. By Randy Stapilus; published by Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 202 pages. Softcover. List price $16.95.
100 Influential Idahoans 2015 page.

100 Influential Idahoans 2015
Idaho
 

Mar 05 2015

Crueler

by under Bond.

Bond DAVID
BOND

 
Rant

T.S. Elliot, the great English poet, said in his epic The Waste Land, that April is the cruelest month. Being born in April, I have to wonder if he was right about that. March strikes me as crueler.

(A caveat to March. It was the month my wonderful mother was born until a few Octobers ago took her away from me.)

But March this year also marks the sixth month I have been banished from publishing in Hagadonia, even for free. I wrote for free, for years, just to give a voice to the miners up here – men and women too exhausted at the end of a long shift to put words to paper, but articulate nevertheless. All I did was take notes.

The miners and timbermen create the fat-cat economy people in Coeur d’Alene and Spokane and Seattle and Missoula enjoy. Burn up the saw-mills, pull down the headframes, your need to drive metal cars and live in wood houses prevails.

Coeur d’Alene offends me.

Rather than restore the fine old steamships that used to ply the lake, they burned them to the Plimsols and let them sink, to much hurrah. Louise Shadduck, a dearly-departed friend, wept. When Hagadonia acquired the Elizabeth, New Jersey, Daily Journal, one of its first moves was to haul 200 years’ worth of newspaper archives to the garbage dump. This action against New Jersey’s oldest newspaper led to a strike nobody wanted. I was there.

Whither history, then? From where comes the voice of the working man making history right now? Or is the working class beneath and above them an embarrassment to the putters at the Coeur d’Alene Resort?

On to my dearly-departed Mother. Patty was her name. She was graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of California, but as a kid all I knew was that she could stuff 50 kids into a 1955 station wagon and take us anywhere. She was a community organizer in the real, not presidential sense. She led me to believe that reading good books was the best thing I could do, and she helped me through the flash-cards we had to do for arithmetic.

Mom hosted a University Women’s meeting every Wednesday at our house on Vancouver Island, and I would sneak down the stairs to listen to these elegant ladies discuss nuclear disarmament, Nevil Shute’s “On the Beach,” Ike’s deals with Tito and Kru. Mom turned me on to writers like Norman Maclean. She never quit giving.

We talked every week, up until the time she died. Her ending is too horrible to write about. Imagine a great big beached fish, flopping about on a hospital bed, unaware, and having to pull the plugs out of your best friend.

She gave me a love of literature, from sitting on her lap and reading Dickens, to some great authors and poets in later years that she sent me.

Enough of that. I am crying. And enough of Hagadonia. They wouldn’t get it.

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Mar 05 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

New dean of students at UI resigns (Boise Statesman)
Corps engineer takes new look at Snake dam breaching (Boise Statesman)
Legislatue trims its to-do list (TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune)
Teacher pay increase considered by legislature (Lewiston Tribune)
Judge may bear down on Syringa case (Moscow News)
Rail lines near Pullman may be abaondoned (Moscow News)
Early planting begins in Magic Valley (TF Times News)

Center for mentally ill will close (Eugene Register Guard)
Green fuel bill clears legislature (Portland Oregonian, Eugene Register Guard, Salem Statesman Journal, Medford Tribune, Pendleeton E Oregonian)
What will Congress do with Klamath settlement? (KF Herald & News)
President of KCC receives pay raise (KF Herald & News)
Supreme Court case won’t affect OR health rates (KF Herald & News)
Gas prices continue rise (Medford Tribune)
Blue Mountain college bond goes public (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Brown calls for inquiry of energy tax credits (Portland Oregonian)
Chief Joseph, Duniway headed to US Capitol (Salem Statesman Journal)

Reviewing effects of Supreme Court on health care (Bremerton Sun)
Olympic park seeks funds for road repair (Bremerton Sun)
Olympia city changes committee makeup, mayor role (Olympian)
Lanslides an ongoing problem near Port Angeles (Port Angeles News)
Port Angeles bans fireworks (Port Angeles News)
New Seattle city district plan yields more candidates (Seattle Times)
Medical school measure pursued at Olympia (Spokane Spokesman)
New traffic cams spotted near schools (Spokane Spokesman)
City of North Bonneville may open public pot shop (Vancouver Columbian)
Slow development on BPA power line (Vancouver Columbian)

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Mar 04 2015

The Hindu prayer

frazier DAVID
FRAZIER

 
Boise
Guardian

Looks like the Ada County Highway District isn’t the only governmental body making headlines based on religious prayer to open meetings.

With its history of accepting free trips to Turkey from the Islamic-based Gulen Society, it is no surprise the Idaho Senate is set to open its Tuesday session with a Hindu Mantra–according to a press release we received from Rajan Zed who bills himself as “President of Universal Society of Hinduism.”

We assume the release is legit since it included the image of Zed and appeared to come from him. When we did some additional research (Google), it looked like he has enjoyed a vast amount of prior publicity forcing legislative bodies to hear his Hindu invocation. Most notable was on July 12, 2007, when he appeared at the United States Senate as its guest Chaplain to the dismay of some Christians who were arrested. Continue Reading »

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Mar 04 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

At Senate’s Hindu prayer, partial GOP walkout (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
UI student dean resigns after 2 months (Lewiston Tribune, Moscow News)
Washington may raise minimum wage to $12 (Lewiston Tribune)
Boater say ‘poison pill’ in Deer Flat plan (Nampa Press Tribune)
Little action on road funding legislation (Nampa Press Tribune)
Idaho may get March presidential primary (TF Times News)
Should state try to recoup IEN payments? (TF Times News)

Oil pipeline protest at Eugene brings artists (Eugene Register Guard)
Bill would let workers discuss salaries (Eugene Register Guard)
‘In God We Trust’ motto opponent gets death threat (KF Herald & News)
Gold Hill city hall cameras watching employees (Medford Tribune)
Aryan gang may get plea agreement (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Why gas prices rose so fast lately (Portand Oregonian)
Unemployment rate falls again to 6.3% (Salem Statesman Journal)

Very low snowpack around Washington (Bellingham Herald)
Adele Ferguson of Bremerton Sun dies (Bremerton Sun)
House votes for $12 minimum wage bill (Spokane Spokedsman, Vancouver Columbian, Bremerton Sun, Olympian)
Flu kills 9 people in Snohomish (Everett Herald)
Big pay boost for Lacey manager (Olympian)
Local lawmakers oppose gas tax (Port Angeles News)
Moneytree pushes to weaken state loaning laws (Seattle Times)
Why gas prices rose so fast lately (Tacoma News Tribune)
Plans for five waterfront blocks released (Vancouver Columbian)
Yakima Clerk, commissioners battle rages (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Mar 03 2015

At the Benewah County Lincoln Day

carlson CHRIS
CARLSON

 
Carlson
Chronicles

My Democratic sympathies are well known, so there was more than an eyebrow or two that arched up when I walked into the St. Maries Elk Club last Saturday, plopped my $10 down for the chili luncheon fare, and took a seat.

While some were surprised, they were no more surprised than I at the warm greetings I received. County GOP chair, former State Representative Dick Harwood, was his usual gracious self. I’ve known Harwood for years. While we seldom agree on much, we respect each others right to hold differing views and we keep our sense of humor.

Likewise, St. Maries City Councilman Judd Wilson, though a Tea Party Republican, is a good friend and we enjoy debating the issues and exchange book recommendations. Wilson knows I have a soft spot for Marines inasmuch as my son, Scott, is currently a captain in the Corps. Wilson is a retired USMC officer though he’d be quick to tell you that once a Marine, always a Marine.

I also enjoyed meeting the State GOP’s Second Vice Chair, Jim Pierce, who walked over and introduced himself. Said he was a fourth generation Idahoan who enjoyed my columns, though he seldom agreed with their point.

I said that wasn’t a bother. My purpose was achieved if I provoked a reader to see things from a different perspective and to revisit an isssue.

I came to listen to what Senator Mike Crapo had to say about current debates in Washington, D.C. I like Mike Crapo. He is thoughtful, intelligent and articulate. I have long admired the courage he showed when sitting on the Simpson/Bowles Coimmission that President Obama largely named to look at the catastrophic escalation of the national debt and recommend some tough castor oil.

President Obama began to lose me when he did not endorse the tough set of spending cuts, some new taxes and some genuine reforms to get us back on the path to fiscal sanity and balanced budgets. Crapo stood out in forthrightly defending the Commission’s work.

All that said, I was surprised by the Senator’s remarks. Frankly, he just tossed out “red meat” one-liners to his conservative audience. It was political cant, posturing and patronizing. Continue Reading »

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Mar 03 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Statehouse add words protesters arrested (Boise Statesman, TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune)
A court settlement nears for juvenile mental health (Boise Statesman)
Idaho House votes for exam requirement for RU486 (Nampa Press Tribune, TF Times News, Lewiston Tribune)
UI student dean resigns (Moscow News)
Downtown Caldwell envisions plaza (Nampa Press Tribune)
Nampa council approves new St Al hospital (Nampa Press Tribune)
Debate over ‘constitutional carry’? (Pocatello Journal)

Lawsuits suggest Astoria port is a troubled place (Astorian)
Warrenton consider pot future (Astorian)
Mass vaccinations at UO (Eugene Register Guard)
Finalists names for Eugene school superintendet (Eugene Register Guard)
Snowpack down to record lows (KF Herald & News)
Could Medford pot moratorium help black market? (Medford Tribune)
Josephine Co considers $4m unpaid PERS bill (Medford Tribune)
Pendleton considers major water rate hikes (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Legislators consider tax break for data centers (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Reviewing state legal costs in Kitzhaber case (Portland Oregonian)
State parks looking for rehab, not additions (Salem Statesman Journal)
State law would offer chemical regulation (Salem Statesman Journal)

Inslee talks about cost of college at WWU (Bellingham Herald)
State Senate, House conflict on labor bills (Bellingham Herald)
Senate approves transit legislation (Spokane Spokesman, Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic, Bellingham Herald, Olympian, Bremerton Sun, Longview News)
State DNR rejects Navy training plan (Bremerton Sun)
Airlines planning under way at Paine Field (Everett Herald)
Owen kills 2/3 rule for Senate tax bills (Tacoma News Tribune, Yakima Herald Republic, Olympian, Longview News)
Simpson lumber sale led to layoffs (Longview News)
Clallam County looks at economic development money (Port Angeles News)
Pierce county sues to stop lawsuit over building (Tacoma News Tribune)
Oil trains could expand massively in Washington (Vancouver Columbian)
Motor oil spills into Sunnyside waterways (Yakima Herald Republic)

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Mar 02 2015

Welcome, Madam Speaker

rainey BARRETT
RAINEY

 
Second
Thoughts

Our congratulations to Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) on selection as Speaker du jour of the U.S. House of Representatives. And our thanks to the 52 Republicans who made it possible while cutting the legs off titular Speaker John Boehner. While he may retain the title, the power referred to in that nomenclature clearly belongs to the lady from California.

To me, it’s not a Republican or Democrat thing. It’s a who-can-govern issue. He can’t. She can. The Friday night edge-of-the-cliff-follies dealing with continued funding for the Department of Homeland Security could more aptly be titled “Night of the Long Knives” for Boehner and his political party of the perpetual Chinese fire drill. It was not Boehner’s first public humiliation. It won’t be his last. Bet the farm.

Apparently without giving marching – read voting – orders to her Democrat soldiers, the Minority leader sat on the sidelines, watched the Republican bloodletting as the first DHS bill was killed by GOP subversives, then called a quick news conference.

She announced she was “asking” Democrats in the House to get behind the second DHS bill because “national security is at stake and the issue is too important for partisan politics.” And that’s how it appeared in living rooms from coast to coast. A request based on national interest and common sense. Jolly good!

What it really was was gut politics at its best. And the guy getting the gut shot was Boehner. Without Pelosi and her Democrat soldiers, Boehner couldn’t do what he’d had at least three weeks to get done. DHS would close up shop in a couple of hours. He and his “leadership” team publically proved they (1) couldn’t accurately count the noses of their own troops, (2) couldn’t “whip” enough loyal troops to pass what had to pass, and (3) couldn’t avoid a DHS shutdown without votes from the Democrat caucus.

Pelosi quietly – and behind-the-scenes – did what Boehner and his minions couldn’t do in public. Or in private either, for that matter. Again, it’s not a matter of liking Pelosi or disliking Boehner. It’s two contestants in the ring. One who knows what to do there – the other without a clue – who stopped training too early for the big fight. She whipped him. Fair and square.

While the DHS funding bill was important, there’s an even larger matter to consider. Pelosi’s agenda – and that of the Democrat party – is immigration reform, tax reform, public works spending, voting rights protections and a half dozen more subjects of national importance. If you make a vertical list of those, then a second list of what the Republican crazies oppose, you’ll pretty much be able to draw a straight line from items in column “A” to items in column “B.”

The clown bus folk can scream, holler and pound their little fists on the well-carpeted House floor. But, if Boehner wants to survive with all the perks of being Speaker, he’s going to have to come to terms with the lady from California to save his own butt …. er …. bacon. Continue Reading »

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Mar 02 2015

In the Briefings

kingenergytracking
 

King County Executive Dow Constantine (foreground, left) tours a new energy use tracking system being installed by the county. (See the local government section.) (image/King County)

 
After the gubernatorial excitement of the last few weeks, things seemed to settle down a bit in Oregon last week. Just as the legislative activity started to pick up.

So it seemed in the other two states as well.

Idaho officials managed a short-term stopgap last week in the public school broadband collapse; money was appropriated, and for the most part at least the system will not go dark – for now. How long the stopgap may sufficie, though, remains unclear.

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Mar 02 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Legislators consider legalizing marijuana oil (Boise Statesman)
Community funds awarded to neighborhoods (Boise Statesman)
Juvenile mental health care lawsuit nears end (Lewiston Tribune)
Schmidt held Moscow town hall (Moscow News)

Tires stored illegally at Eugene draw state (Eugene Register Guard)
Legislators consider limits on vaping (Eugene Register Guard)
Lawmakers balancing cleaner fuel, gas prices (Medford Tribune)
Portland looks for new home for homeless (Portland Oregonian)
GMO food label bill slows down at statehouse (Salem Statesman Journal)

Kitsap resolves condo lawsuit (Bremerton Sun)
Timber sale near Gold Bar held off (Everett Herald)
Hospital at Monroe will change name and alliance (Everett Herald)
What was Kitzhaber doing his last couple weeks as gov? (Longview News)
New chief tries for change at Seattle police (Seattle Times)
Spokane composting gets concerns from state (Spokane Spokesman)
Flu season still continuing (Vancouver Columbian, Yakima Herald Republic)
Fort Vancouver plan raise in entry fee (Vancouver Columbian)

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Mar 01 2015

Actual effects

idaho RANDY
STAPILUS
 
Washington

The argument against major raises to the minimum wage, notably in Washington – where the minimum is the highest in the country – sometimes runs to the ideological (government shouldn’t so regulate business) but focuses more on the practical.

That is: Higher minimum wages would have negative economic effects, especially in the area of the number of jobs out there. Raise the wage, the argument goes, and the business-wage monetary pie will be sliced fewer ways, cutting out some of the jobs.

The argument sounds sensible from a numerical standpoint, but it runs aground in several other places. One is that the amount of money dedicated to paychecks is not static: It varies as the need for workers goes up or down. A hamburger joint that needs to hire (let’s say) a dozen workers to meet the demand and keep the business operating properly isn’t going to suddenly drop to nine employees because wages went up. More likely, as is the case for any business when some part of the operation becomes more costly, the price of a burger and fries will edge up. Most of the time, customers little notice – less than they would if they weren’t getting their orders filled.

This comes back to mind with a piece in the Horse’s Ass blog, recalling the warnings of Andrew Friedman, a Seattle bar owner (it’s called Liberty, of course) warned that a $15 minimum wage meant “Local independent businesses WILL closed, many of your neighbors WILL be out of work.”

About nine months ago, the minimum wage was approved. A few days ago, some months after its effects had some time to settle in, Friedman had some business news. No, not the closure of Liberty, but rather the opening of second bar (the Good Citizen).

Sounds like more jobs have been created.

Albeit, for customers, probably a higher tab on the well drinks.

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Mar 01 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

West Ada bond again: schools filling fast (Boise Statesman)
Pullman drone company gets ready to ship (Lewiston Tribune)
Parental control bill and faith healing (Nampa Press Tribune)
Ed official says broadband transition continues (Nampa Press Tribune)
Vallivue schools look at new bond (Nampa Press Tribune)

New trails sought for Skinner Butte (Eugene Register Guard)
Legislators consider clean fuel details (Eugene Register Guard)
Tuition at UO may increase 3.7% (Eugene Register Guard)
Reviewing Cover Oregon (KF Herald & News)
Republicans pick Currier as new party chair (Portland Oregonian)
Solar project wrongly gets tax credits (Portland Oregonian)
Looking at where homeless crisis came from (Portland Oregonian)
Looking at Kitzhaber’s last two weeks (Salem Statesman Journal)

Evaluating Kitsap water quality (Bremerton Sun)
Could Paine become a passenger terminal? (Everett Herald)
Some schools tocking reec facilities after hours (Everett Herald)
Medical pot growers concerned about new bill (Longview News)
Propane exporter make case for Longview shipping (Longview News)
7,600 marine mammals found in Lower Columbia (Longview News)
2/3 of state spending legally mandated (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
State has concerns on electronic warfare training (Port Angeles News)
Reviewing socialist Sawant’s term on council (Seattle Times)
Problems over sales of Super Bowl tickets still persist (Seattle Times, Yakima Herald Tribune)
Bill would split pot revenue with local agencies (Vancouver Columbian)
Seattle school refuses Common Core testing (Vancouver Columbian)

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Feb 28 2015

A dry time

idaho RANDY
STAPILUS
 
Idaho

When I want to check an official record for an indication of how wet or dry the region is, I usually go to the Western Regional Climate Center (wrcc.dri.edu), which among other things compiles snowpack information for the western United States. The numbers there rise and fall, but at the moment the numbers on its charts seem not to look all that bad.

Usually I look for the percent of normal accumulated precipitation, which shows how various areas – river basins mainly, but broken down to much smaller units – are faring. 100 percent at this time of year typically would indicate normal levels. 150 percent would suggest some risk of flooding (at least in some places, depending on the lay of the land); 50 percent or less usually means dry times ahead.

The “water year” for measurement purposes started at the beginning of October, and for some weeks toward the end of last year the numbers were looking good, even on the high side. But in the last couple of months there’s been a gradual drop.

They’re still not terrible, and if they maintain where they are now into summer Idaho would have ample water. The Spokane River basin, at this writing, was 90 percent; the Salmon River, 97 percent; the Little Wood River basin 80 percent. Some are lower, like the Medicine Lodge area (64 percent) and Bear River Basin (76 percent). These are areas not usually awash in water to start with.

The problem is that so far this year, week after week, the numbers have been falling. The omens are not especially good.

I’d be uneasy about interpreting some of this except for the road trip I took last week around the Northwest. I know what February usually looks like in many of the state’s landscapes – in most years past there’s a good deal of white out there, especially in higher elevations – and it doesn’t much look that way now.

The standout was the Long Valley – the McCall and Cascade area. February is when McCall holds its traditional Winter Carnival, the centerpiece of which is a large collection of ice sculptures. The dates this year were January 27 to February 5, and there were as usual some great sculptures. (The winner was a Sphinx and pyramid theme. McCall usually is bathed in white during and for some time after the event.

But this year they held it not a moment too early. By the time early last week I passed through McCall, the snow was almost all gone, and only a few small, melting sculptures remained.

Look up to the mountainsides around Long Valley and you’ll find checkerboard broad and white surfaces, nothing like the solid white of yore. Continue Reading »

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Feb 28 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

Middleton launches its own police force (Boise Statesman)
Nez Perce court has $7m in unpaid debt (Lewiston Tribune)
Teacher salaries would rise under Idaho legislation (Nampa Press Tribune, Lewiston Tribune, Moscow News)
Idaho minimum wage bill appears but stops (Nampa Press Tribune)
Bald eagles in SW Idaho captured on camera (Nampa Press Tribune)

Employee of Shockley begin their own firm (Eugene Register Guard)
Bighorn sheep moving in around Klamath (KF Herald & News)
Cover Oregon dissolution bill goes to Brown (KF Herald & News)
Lowest snow ever at Crater Lake (Medford Tribune)
Kitzhaber email leak happened amidst audit (Pendleton E Oregonian)
State carbon plan called inefficient (Portland Oregonian)
More children in learning environments in Oregon (Portland Oregonian)
Senate Republicans kicked from gas tax talk (Salem Statesman Journal)
Oregon exports limitedwith port problems (Salem Statesman Journal)

Bellingham activists mull new civic event (Bellingham Herald)
Kilmer seeks local input on Navy training (Bremerton Sun)
Local governments take new records tack (Everett Herald)
New ferry starts runs at Westport (Longview News)
Gas tax bill blocked by new Senate rules (Olympian)
Seattle elephants headed for Oklahoma (Seattle Times)
CEO at Avista paid $5.5m last year (Spokane Spokesman)
Ruston may contract with Tacoma on permits (Tacoma News Tribune)
More debate over ‘In God we trust’ (Vancouver Columbian)

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Feb 27 2015

The power of Native voters

trahant MARK
TRAHANT

 
Austerity

I have been writing for years about the success — well, at least mostly — of Native American voters. During recent presidential election cycles the turnout from Indian Country is inspiring, helping to swing elections from Arizona to North Dakota.

And just last year Alaska Native voters helped dump a hostile state governor and replaced him with Gov. Bill Walker, an ally, as well as electing Byron Mallott, a Tlingit leader, as the Lt. Governor.

But do you want to know something really cool?

The demographic shift that reflects Native voting power is only beginning. What’s more the landscape is changing faster than expected and should bring about dramatic changes in states as “red” as Alaska and Oklahoma.

A new report looks at the numbers and the results are stunning. In 1980 when Ronald Reagan was elected president the population of the United States was 80 percent white. Today that proportion stands at 63 percent and it’s likely to be less than 44 percent by 2060. The report, “The States of Change: Demographics and Democracy” is a collaboration of the liberal Center for American Progress, the conservative American Enterprise Institute and demographer William H. Frey of the Brookings Institution. One of the goals is to “document and analyze the challenges to democracy posed by the rapid demographic evolution from the 1970s to 2060.”

One lens that is particularly revealing: States where people of color are the majority. The report said: “Right now, there are only four majority-minority states: California, Hawaii, New Mexico, and Texas. But with the ongoing demographic transformation of the country, our States of Change projections find that this will become more and more common.” So in five years Maryland and Nevada will be in that category. Then by 2060 the number of majority-minority states will reach 22, including seven of the currently largest states, making up about two-thirds of the country’s population.

American Indians and Alaska Natives are very much a part of this new majority because we are younger and growing faster than an older white population. Continue Reading »

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Feb 27 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

LaBeau profane blast at Siddoway discussed (Boise Statesman, Nampa Press Tribune)
Small counties have hard time on death penalty cases (Boise Statesman)
Snake/Clearwater dredging project done (Lewiston Tribune)
Sangria Development to build at 6th & Jackson (Moscow News)
Pullman hospital contributes toward home health (Moscow News)
St Alphonsus plans new hospital at Nampa (Nampa Press Tribune)

Eugene probably moves on Civic stadium (Eugene Register Guard)
KF high school will be renovated (KF Herald & News)
Another council recall planned at Tulelake (KF Herald & News)
Jackson Co proposes pot dispensary buffers (Medford Tribune)
Medford schools may add health center (Medford Tribune)
Hayes tries to bock email releases (Portland Oregonian, Salem Statesman Journal, Pendleton E Oregonian)
State agency reviews market place for pot (Portland Oregonian)
Brown supports end to death penalty (Portland Oregonian)

Bainbridge Island may tighten dog ordinance (Bremerton Sun)
Legislature on more disclosure of landslide area (Everett Herald)
Battle develops on Inslee e-cig tax plan (Olympian)
Health exchange consumer to be refunded for overbills (Olympian, Port Angeles News)
Will legalization end pot black market? (Seattle Times)
Possible increase in I-90 speed limit (Spokane Spokesman)
Senator Benton charges many mileage bills (Vancuver Columbian)
What’s ahead for medical, recreational pot merge (Vancouver Columbian)

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Feb 26 2015

The blame is ours

rainey BARRETT
RAINEY

 
Second
Thoughts

Our so-called “social media” has been filled in recent days with the totally embarrassing remarks of an Idaho Republican legislative troll during a public hearing the other day. And the state’s reputation took yet another prominent hit in the national media as it so often has in recent times.

This time the troll was Rep. Vito Barbieri of the crazy North Idaho Barbieri’s. Guy’s been elected three times because voters in his district all seem to come from the same shallow end of the gene pool and see nothing wrong. He’s a California transplant who says he’s a lawyer though he’s never taken the Idaho Bar exam. He eats his own shoe leather – regularly and publically – by inserting his foot in his mouth before engaging his brain.

This time, his question of a doctor testifying before an Idaho House committee – a woman doctor yet and in a very public hearing – was whether it would be possible to peek inside a woman’s vagina by putting a small camera down her throat. Now, if for some reason you haven’t heard this, I’m definitely not making this up. I swear!

The cherry on top of this dipstick? He’s a board member of a North Idaho pregnancy crisis group. How’d you like to have him answer the phone when your scared teenage daughter – or any daughter – was reaching out for help?

“Just swallow a little camera, Dear, and see if it’s all O.K. down there.”

Now, I grant the nation’s political bodies aren’t full of PhD’s. And not everyone who chooses to run for public office has the skills deemed necessary to tie both shoes. So, some political vacancies extant are filled in by … well, let’s just say the “intellectually under-served.” Like a Barbieri.

Yes, he’s caught his share of embarrassing shots for the last week or so. Yet again. He’s even tried to say the question was “rhetorical.” Rhetorical? To which one could legitimately respond, “What the Hell’s the difference?” Continue Reading »

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Feb 26 2015

On the front pages

news

Here’s what public affairs news made the front page of newspapers in the Northwest today, excluding local crime, features and sports stories. (Newspaper names contracted with location)

University adjuncts protest for better pay (Boise Statesman, Lewiston Tribune, Moscow News)
More research into how sagebrush survive (Boise Statesman)
Lewiston police short on ammo supplies (Lewiston Tribune)
Legislators says 2nd amendment activists harassing (Pocatello Journal, Moscow News)
Moscow-Pullman airport work near start (Moscow News)
Anti-bully measure introduced at legislature (Nampa Press Tribune)
Citizenship test bill runs into problems (Nampa Press Tribune)

Fewer hospitalist doctors available (Eugene Register Guard)
KCC leader will stay at Klamath (KF Herald & News)
Numbers of Oregon wolves on increase (KF Herald & News)
Kitzhaber’s appointees halted at Senate (Medford Tribune)
Heavy absentees in Oregon schools may affect budgets (Medford Tribune)
Pendleton tries to create public database (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Legislators prepare to fund schools budget (Pendleton E Oregonian)
Economy looking good for eastern Oregon (Pendleton E Oregonian)
IRS looking into Kitzhaber finances too (Portland Oregonian)
The difficulties of prosecuting bike theives (Portland Oregonian)
Vaccine requirement bill meeting canceled (Salem Statesman Journal)

Some health insurance recipients overbilled (Bremerton Sun)
About grizzly bear restoration efforts (Everett Herald)
Lovick delivers state of Snohomish speech (Everett Herald)
Inslee doesn’t talk taxes to air industry leaders (Everett Herald)
Longview community house has financial trouble (Longview News)
Impacts of low-snow winter on power weighed (Longview News)
Discussing costs of legislator travel (Tacoma News Tribune, Olympian)
Olympia courts might move to downtown (Olympian)
Feds study new arco protections (Port Angeles News)
Seattle downtown workers using more non-car transit (Seattle Times)
Microsoft managers fires over expenses (Seattle Times)
Gig Harbor tax activists want vote on building (Tacoma News Tribune)
Still more about ‘In God we trust’ (Vancouver Columbian)

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WASHINGTON-OREGON-IDAHO Our acclaimed weekly e-pubs: 35-45 pages Monday mornings getting you on top of your state. Samples available. Contact us by email or by phone at (208)484-0460.

 

 
RIDENBAUGH BOOKS
 


 
"Essentially, I write in the margins of motherhood—and everything else—then I work these notes into a monthly column about what it’s like raising my two young boys. Are my columns funny? Are they serious? They don’t fit into any one box neatly. ... I’ve won awards for “best humorous column” though I actually write about subjects as light as bulimia, bullying, birthing plans and breastfeeding. But also bon-bons. And barf, and birthdays." Raising the Hardy Boys: They Said There Would Be Bon-Bons. by Nathalie Hardy; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 238 pages. Softcover. $15.95.
Raising the Hardy Boys page.

 

Hardy

 
"Not a day passes that I don’t think about Vietnam. Sometimes its an aroma or just hearing the Vietnamese accent of a store clerk that triggers a memory. Unlike all too many soldiers, I never had to fire a weapon in anger. Return to civilian life was easy, but even after all these years away from the Army and Vietnam I find the experience – and knowledge – continue to shape my life daily."
 
Drafted! Vietnam in War and in Peace. by David R. Frazier; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton OR. 188 pgs. Softcover. $15.95.
The DRAFTED! page.

 

Drafted
 
Many critics said it could not be done - and it often almost came undone. Now the Snake River Basin Adjudication is done, and that improbable story is told here by three dozen of the people most centrally involved with it - judges, attorneys, legislators, engineers, water managers, water users and others in the room when the decisions were made.
Through the Waters: An Oral History of the Snake River Basin Adjudication. edited by the Idaho State Bar Water Law Section and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 300 pages. Softcover. $16.95.
See the THROUGH THE WATERS page.


 
Oregon Governor Vic Atiyeh died on July 20, 2014; he was widely praised for steady leadership in difficult years. Writer Scott Jorgensen talks with Atiyeh and traces his background, and what others said about him.
Conversations with Atiyeh. by W. Scott Jorgensen; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 140 pages. Softcover. $14.95.
The CONVERSATIONS WITH ATIYEH page.

Atiyeh
 
"Salvation through public service and the purging of awful sights seen during 1500 Vietnam War helicopter rescue missions before an untimely death, as told by a devoted brother, leaves a reader pondering life's unfairness. A haunting read." Chris Carlson, Medimont Reflections. ". . . a vivid picture of his brother Jerry’s time as a Medivac pilot in Vietnam and contrasts it with the reality of the political system . . . through the lens of a blue-collar, working man made good." Mike Kennedy.
One Flaming Hour: A memoir of Jerry Blackbird. by Mike Blackbird; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 220 pages. Softcover. $15.95.
See the ONE FLAMING HOUR page.


 
Back in Print! Frank Church was one of the leading figures in Idaho history, and one of the most important U.S. senators of the last century. From wilderness to Vietnam to investigating the CIA, Church led on a host of difficult issues. This, the one serious biography of Church originally published in 1994, is back in print by Ridenbaugh Press.
Fighting the Odds: The Life of Senator Frank Church. LeRoy Ashby and Rod Gramer; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 800 pages. Softcover. $24.95.
See the FIGHTING THE ODDS page.


 
JOURNEY WEST

by Stephen Hartgen
The personal story of the well-known editor, publisher and state legislator's travel west from Maine to Idaho. A well-written account for anyone interested in Idaho, journalism or politics.
JOURNEY WEST: A memoir of journalism and politics, by Stephen Hartgen; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, here or at Amazon.com (softcover)

 

 

NEW EDITIONS is the story of the Northwest's 226 general-circulation newspapers and where your newspaper is headed.
New Editions: The Northwest's Newspapers as They Were, Are and Will Be. Steve Bagwell and Randy Stapilus; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. 324 pages. Softcover. (e-book ahead). $16.95.
See the NEW EDITIONS page.

How many copies?

 
THE OREGON POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

The Field Guide is the reference for the year on Oregon politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Compiled by a long-time Northwest political writer and a Salem Statesman-Journal political reporter.
OREGON POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Hannah Hoffman; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
THE IDAHO POLITICAL
FIELD GUIDE 2014

by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase is the reference for the year on Idaho Politics - the people, the districts, the votes, the issues. Written by two of Idaho's most veteran politcal observers.
IDAHO POLITICAL FIELD GUIDE 2014, by Randy Stapilus and Marty Trillhaase; Ridenbaugh Press, Carlton, Oregon. $15.95, available right here or through Amazon.com (softcover)

 
 
without compromise
WITHOUT COMPROMISE is the story of the Idaho State Police, from barely-functioning motor vehicles and hardly-there roads to computer and biotechnology. Kelly Kast has spent years researching the history and interviewing scores of current and former state police, and has emerged with a detailed and engrossing story of Idaho.
WITHOUT COMPROMISE page.

 

Diamondfield
How many copies?
The Old West saw few murder trials more spectacular or misunderstood than of "Diamondfield" Jack Davis. After years of brushes with the noose, Davis was pardoned - though many continued to believe him guilty. Max Black has spent years researching the Diamondfield saga and found startling new evidence never before uncovered - including the weapon and one of the bullets involved in the crime, and important documents - and now sets out the definitive story. Here too is Black's story - how he found key elements, presumed lost forever, of a fabulous Old West story.
See the DIAMONDFIELD page for more.
 

Medimont Reflections Chris Carlson's Medimont Reflections is a followup on his biography of former Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus. This one expands the view, bringing in Carlson's take on Idaho politics, the Northwest energy planning council, environmental issues and much more. The Idaho Statesman: "a pull-back-the-curtain account of his 40 years as a player in public life in Idaho." Available here: $15.95 plus shipping.
See the Medimont Reflections page  
 
Idaho 100 NOW IN KINDLE
 
Idaho 100, about the 100 most influential people ever in Idaho, by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson is now available. This is the book about to become the talk of the state - who really made Idaho the way it is? NOW AN E-BOOK AVAILABLE THROUGH KINDLE for just $2.99. Or, only $15.95 plus shipping.
 

Idaho 100 by Randy Stapilus and Martin Peterson. Order the Kindle at Amazon.com. For the print edition, order here or at Amazon.


 

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    Monday mornings on KLIX-AM

    watergates

    ORDER IT HERE or on Amazon.com

    More about this book by Randy Stapilus

    Water rights and water wars: They’re not just a western movie any more. The Water Gates reviews water supplies, uses and rights to use water in all 50 states.242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

    intermediary

    ORDER IT HERE or on Amazon.com

    More about this book by Lin Tull Cannell

    At a time when Americans were only exploring what are now western states, William Craig tried to broker peace between native Nez Perces and newcomers from the East. 15 years in the making, this is one of the most dramatic stories of early Northwest history. 242 pages, available from Ridenbaugh Press, $15.95

    Upstream

    ORDER HERE or Amazon.com

    The Snake River Basin Adjudication is one of the largest water adjudications the United States has ever seen, and it may be the most successful. Here's how it happened, from the pages of the SRBA Digest, for 16 years the independent source.

    Paradox Politics

    ORDER HERE or Amazon.com

    After 21 years, a 2nd edition. If you're interested in Idaho politics and never read the original, now's the time. If you've read the original, here's view from now.


    Governing Idaho:
    Politics, People and Power

    by James Weatherby
    and Randy Stapilus
    Caxton Press
    order here

    Outlaw Tales
    of Idaho

    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here

    It Happened in Idaho
    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here

    Camping Idaho
    by Randy Stapilus
    Globe-Pequot Press
    order here